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Booster Shots

NEWS
September 6, 2009 | Shari Roan; Patrick Goldstein; Lee Margulies; Gary Klein
Irritability in childhood has been suspected of being a potential symptom of depression. A new study confirms this link. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health questioned the parents of 631 teenagers, whose average age was 13.8, about irritability in their children. Twenty years later, the same children, now adults, were assessed for mood and anxiety disorders. The people who were irritable kids were more likely to be adults with depression or anxiety. However, irritability in adolescence did not predict later development of bipolar disorder or other serious mental health disorders.
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NEWS
October 26, 2008 | Shari Roan; Johanna Neuman; Sarah Rogers
BOOSTER SHOTS General anesthesia may increase the risk of behavioral and developmental problems in young children, according to a study presented last week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in Orlando. Studies in animals have suggested that general anesthesia may be toxic to a developing brain. To assess the risk in children, Dr. Lena S. Sun of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons analyzed data from 625 children younger than 3 who were exposed to general anesthesia as part of an uncomplicated hernia repair.
NEWS
October 12, 2008 | Susan Brink; Colin Ryan; Lance Pugmire
BOOSTER SHOTS Everybody is worried about the rising cost of prescription drugs, but conventional wisdom suggests older people worry more. Not so, says a new survey by Medco, a pharmacy benefit manager. According to the new national survey "Feeling the Health Care Pinch," nearly 70% of people ages 25 to 34 say the economic downturn of the last 12 months has made it somewhat or significantly more difficult to pay for healthcare. Among people older than 55, less than half said that.
NEWS
September 14, 2008 | Rosie Mestel; Carla Rivera; Steve Hymon
BOOSTER SHOTS Life is a road strewn with potholes, wrong turns and tree limbs sticking out at eye height. Don't I know that. But some would argue the hazards are more plentiful and to be found in unexpected places. A PR agent tried to convince me that we are riddled with disease for one principal reason: We eat too much calcium. She turned my attention to her doctor client's book, which darkly warned -- four times by Page 18 -- that calcium is toxic: "Calcium hardens concrete.
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