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Borat

ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2007
I agree with what Mary McNamara says ["The 15-Second Syndrome: When Fame Meets ADD, Nothing Stays on Top for Long," Dec. 16]. This society is spoiled; it is an instant-everything culture. People want to drive their cars to places in four minutes. But "Borat" is not forgotten. Sacha Baron Cohen's movie is among the funniest ever made. "High five" is said everywhere. I hear it all over the place. If you make something good it won't be forgotten. James Cordova Diamond Bar
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Borat is dead. Sacha Baron Cohen tells the Daily Telegraph that he's retiring the clueless Kazakh journalist, as well as his alter ego, aspiring rapper Ali G. "When I was being Ali G and Borat I was in character sometimes 14 hours a day and I came to love them, so admitting I am never going to play them again is quite a sad thing," the 36-year-old actor-comedian said in the British newspaper's Friday edition. "It is like saying goodbye to a loved one.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2007 | Chris Lee
On paper at least, the film sounds like a meeting of two of America's most politically incorrect minds: Lionsgate announced Friday that it had acquired distribution rights to an untitled feature documentary about world religion, directed by Larry Charles (his first project since "Borat: Cultural Learnings for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan") and starring outspoken political humorist Bill Maher -- formerly of Comedy Central's "Politically Incorrect" who is now host of HBO's "Real
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2007 | From Reuters
Fictional Kazakh reporter Borat Sagdiyev, who made movie audiences laugh and cringe as he toured the United States, is going into print with a book of travel advice. Borat, the creation of British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen, has signed a book deal with Flying Dolphin Press, an imprint of Random House Inc.'s Doubleday Broadway Publishing Group. The book, due this fall, will be two texts in one -- one half a guide to the U.S. for Kazakhs, the other a guide to Kazakhstan for Westerners.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007
The government of Kazakhstan wasn't happy with "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan," the film in which Sacha Baron Cohen played a fictional journalist from that country who poked fun at Americans. But not everyone there had problems with the comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2007 | Paul Cullum
ISLA FISHER was born in Muscat, Oman, to Scottish parents, grew up in Perth, Australia, attended clown school in Paris (with Jacques Lecoq) and finally settled in London. But what might have been a train wreck of a speaking voice comes out as a charming Aussie lilt, although -- once again -- her American accent is flawless.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fictional gay cowboys and a faux reporter from Kazakhstan suffered human rights abuses in 2006 as crackdowns extended beyond flesh-and-blood victims to the Internet, award-winning films and noted plays worldwide, the State Department says. Foreign governments banned or restricted access to a variety of big and little screen entertainment -- including the movies "Borat" and "Brokeback Mountain" -- as well as live events, the State Department says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
IN more ways than one, the guerrilla operation that is "Borat" is premised on the ignorance of Sacha Baron Cohen's so-called victims. There will never be another Borat film, at least not another one like this: The movie's stratospheric profile means the supply of unsuspecting dupes has surely dwindled (and it's doubtful if the comedian will even be able to pull off Borat-worthy maneuvers with his next movie, to be constructed around another persona, Austrian fashionista Bruno).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you think of Ken Davitian, you probably think of him naked, obese and pendulous, nearly suffocating the tall but waifish Sacha Baron Cohen in their famous naked hotel room fight in the hit movie "Borat." But there is so much more to Davitian, the 53-year-old actor who so completely inhabited the part of Borat's humorless Kazakh producer Azamat Bagatov that industry people with whom he is taking meetings even now don't realize he is a thoroughly local American actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2007 | Mary McNamara
But what about Borat? Much to the relief, no doubt, of ABC's standards department, Sacha Baron Cohen will not be a presenter at this year's Academy Awards. "He was asked," Oscar broadcast producer Laura Ziskin said Friday, "but he declined." Baron Cohen has been reluctant to make appearances as himself, preferring to do interviews as Borat Sagdiyev, star of the faux documentary, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan."
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