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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters, angered by the recent Border Patrol shooting of a 15-year-old Mexican youth, blockaded the busy U.S.-Mexico border crossing between Mexicali and Calexico for nine hours Wednesday, effectively halting transnational commerce and preventing many farm laborers from reaching the fertile fields of California's Imperial Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
HOUSTON -- The FBI believes a Border Patrol agent found dead in his South Texas home this week had kidnapped and assaulted three women who were in the country illegally, officials said. "He is the subject of the investigation and we believe he is responsible for the kidnapping of all three of the victims," Michelle Lee, an FBI spokeswoman in San Antonio, told the Los Angeles Times. Border Patrol agents discovered one of the women Wednesday during their patrol near the border city of McAllen, about 350 miles south of Houston, according to a statement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
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NATIONAL
February 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - "I'm hit! I'm hit!" U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry cried into the southern Arizona darkness that night, Dec. 14, 2010. "I can't feel my legs!" The 40-year-old Border Patrol agent, who was less than four years on the job, collapsed and died in the desert brush near Rio Rico. Terry's killing unraveled the Justice Department-sanctioned "Fast and Furious" gun-tracking operation and triggered one of the biggest political controversies of President Obama's first term.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- The head of the U.S. Border Patrol announced new rules Friday to limit agents from shooting at moving vehicles or people throwing rocks or other objects at agents, reversing a controversial policy that has led to at least 19 deaths. Border Patrol Chief Michael J. Fisher ordered customs and border agents not to step directly in front of a moving vehicle, or use their body to block it, in order to open fire on the driver. He also barred shooting at vehicles whose occupants are fleeing from agents.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HARLINGEN, Texas - They come from Central America with slips of paper sewn into their pockets bearing names they are sometimes too young to spell. Parents send them with Bibles, rosaries and small wooden crosses in their backpacks. The flood of undocumented immigrants has slowed compared to five years ago - likely due to tighter border enforcement and the economic downturn in the U.S. - but in its place is a new immigration surge even more confounding: children and teenagers traveling through the rugged border lands into south Texas, lured by the promise of safety.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Border Patrol officials have identified the agent shot and killed Tuesday during a patrol south of Tucson as Nicholas Ivie, an almost five-year veteran of the agency. Ivie, 30, was killed after he and two other agents responded to an unusual sensor reading near Highway 80 about 7 miles east of Bisbee, Border Patrol officials said in a statement. “Tucson Sector mourns the loss of one of our own. It stands as a reminder of the dangers that agents of [Customs and Border Protection]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A 28-year-old Mexican national was sentenced Thursday to 56 years in federal prison for his part in the robbery and killing of a Border Patrol agent. Marcos Rodriguez-Perez is the second co-defendant sentenced in the killing of  agent Robert Rosas Jr. near Campo in southern San Diego County on July 23, 2009. Another co-defendant, Christian Daniel Castro-Alvarez, was sentenced in April 2010 to 40 years. Two others, Jose Luis Ramirez-Dorantes and Emilio Samyn Gonzales-Arenazas,  have pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - After deliberating for several hours, a federal jury Friday acquitted a Border Patrol agent of choking an illegal immigrant during an arrest interview at the Imperial Beach station. The case against Agent Luis Fonseca, a six-year veteran, rested largely on a grainy video without audio.  Video of the July 2011 incident appears to show Adolfo Ceja Escobar falling to the floor, his body convulsing. Prosecutors alleged that Fonseca had placed his hands around Escobar's neck and choked him. But the defense attorney told jurors that Escobar was faking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1994
As the sponsors of the amendment to the crime bill to provide an additional 6,000 Border Patrol agents, we were disappointed by your editorial of April 22 ("Immigration Aid: At Last, a Bit of Fairness"), which criticized this initiative. We take exception to your conclusion that hiring these new agents will be ineffective. Experience shows that numbers do matter. In a March 30 letter to us, INS Commissioner Doris Meissner commended Congress on our initiative last year to add 600 agents.
OPINION
April 20, 2012 | By John Carlos Frey
In 2007, the Bush administration set out to double the size of the U.S. Border Patrol. It was a tall order and called for some creativity, with the Border Patrol even sponsoring its own racing vehicle at NASCAR events as a recruitment tool. Because recruits were hard to find, Border Patrol - part of the Department of Homeland Security - also lowered its standards and training regimens were relaxed. Individuals without a high school diploma could already join the force, but background checks were also deferred.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
It looks like the U.S. Border Patrol has opted for a policy of common sense. As The Times editorial page wrote last week , and the news pages documented earlier , federal agents patrolling the Mexican border have been involved in dozens of confrontations in which agents stepped in front of moving cars as a pretext to open fire in self-defense, and also responded to rocks thrown at them across the border with deadly fire. Border Patrol chief Michael J. Fisher on Friday told his agents to knock it off, though not in so many words.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Border Patrol has restricted border agents' authority to shoot at moving vehicles or at people throwing rocks, changing a controversial policy that has contributed to at least 19 deaths since 2010. In a memo released Friday, Border Patrol Chief Michael Fisher directed border agents not to step in front of moving vehicles, nor to use their bodies to block them, in order to open fire at drivers. He also barred shooting at vehicles whose occupants are fleeing from agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Tony Perry
Two men were arrested at the San Clemente checkpoint Thursday after agents found a load of marijuana-laced candy in their car, the Border Patrol said. The two arrived at the checkpoint on Interstate 5 at 1 a.m. in a 2012 Chrysler. In the trunk of the vehicle agents found three sealed boxes containing lollipops, hard candy and cookies laced with tetrahydrocannabinol, the constituent ingredient of the cannabis plant, the Border Patrol said. The candy seemed to be "geared toward children," according to the Border Patrol.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Gil Kerlikowske on Thursday to be the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, allowing the White House "drug czar" to take on his new post overseeing the Border Patrol. Kerlikowske came to the White House as director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the job commonly known as “drug czar,” after serving as chief of police in Seattle from 2001 to 2009. He will take over an organization under fire on several fronts, including secrecy surrounding incidents in which agents shot people suspected of throwing rocks at them from the other side of the U.S.-Mexico border.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Now we have an idea why the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service was keeping secret an independent report of its encounters at the Mexican border. Because it has something to hide. As The Times' Brian Bennett reported last week, an independent report by the nonprofit Police Executive Research Forum sharply criticized the agency for a "lack of diligence" in investigating fatal encounters involving its agents. The report, based on internal case files of 67 shooting incidents leading to 19 deaths between January 2010 and October 2012, also faulted some of the agents' practices, including positioning themselves in the "exit path" of fleeing vehicles apparently as a pretext for opening fire in self-defense.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Spanish-language media - particularly in Mexico - are abuzz following a Tribune Washington Bureau report on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency's use of deadly force while patrolling the nation's border with Mexico. The article was based on an independent review of U.S. Border Patrol shootings. The report - conducted by a group of law enforcement experts - criticized agents for “lack of diligence” in theirs investigations, suggesting agents intentionally provoked confrontations by sometimes stepping in the path of cars apparently to justify shootings.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The fatal shooting of Border Patrol Agent Nicholas Ivie on Tuesday prompted concerns about the security of the border area  in rural Cochise County, Ariz., where he died.  In neighboring Santa Cruz County, Sheriff Tony Estrada said crime had fallen sharply along the border in recent years, due to a steep drop in illegal immigrant traffic as well as increased Border Patrol staffing. But violent clashes are not uncommon in isolated areas used by drug traffickers and bandits who prey on illegal immigrants.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
A Mexican man with a history of illegally moving across the U.S. border has been indicted with several still-unnamed defendants in the slaying of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry during a late-night encounter in a remote southern Arizona canyon. A federal grand jury indictment unsealed Friday charges Manuel Osorio-Arellanes, who was wounded in the confrontation, with second-degree murder, assault of a federal officer and other crimes stemming from the Dec. 14 incident. Authorities said several other suspects named in the indictment, including the man thought to have fired the shot that killed Terry, remain at large.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Border Patrol agents have deliberately stepped in the path of cars apparently to justify shooting at the drivers and have fired in frustration at people throwing rocks from the Mexican side of the border, according to an independent review of 67 cases that resulted in 19 deaths. The report by law enforcement experts criticized the Border Patrol for "lack of diligence" in investigating U.S. agents who had fired their weapons. It also said it was unclear whether the agency "consistently and thoroughly reviews" use-of-deadly-force incidents.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
AMADO, Ariz. - Border-area residents, upset with what they called an increased militarized presence in their community, began an effort Wednesday to monitor Border Patrol actions at a federal immigration checkpoint about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Arizona. Organizers with a humanitarian aid group called People Helping People in the Border Zone have called on the Border Patrol to remove the checkpoint in Amado, a town of about 300 people. Some residents say they have to deal with unnecessary delays, harassment and sometimes abuse at the checkpoint.
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