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OPINION
July 25, 2007
Re "Building a deathtrap," editorial, July 21 I've noticed plenty of bizarre editorials in The Times, but this takes the cake. The Times wails that repairs to the 82-mile All American Canal, which carries water from the Colorado River along the border with Mexico, will be a dangerous threat to illegals crossing that river, so steps and rescue equipment should be built into the concrete lining.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Ken Dobson, a retired police officer, said he received quite a welcome when he landed his single-engine Cessna in Detroit two days after leaving his home in Palm Desert. Five sheriff's cars surrounded the plane and deputies got out with guns drawn. Then a helicopter arrived with four federal agents and a drug-sniffing dog. They demanded to see Dobson's pilot's license, asked about the flight and mentioned that his long trip from Southern California was suspicious. Fearing he would lose his flight credentials if he didn't cooperate, Dobson consented to a search of his plane.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Ken Dobson, a retired police officer, said he received quite a welcome when he landed his single-engine Cessna in Detroit two days after leaving his home in Palm Desert. Five sheriff's cars surrounded the plane and deputies got out with guns drawn. Then a helicopter arrived with four federal agents and a drug-sniffing dog. They demanded to see Dobson's pilot's license, asked about the flight and mentioned that his long trip from Southern California was suspicious. Fearing he would lose his flight credentials if he didn't cooperate, Dobson consented to a search of his plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - A veteran U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer was sentenced Monday to 7½ years in federal prison after being convicted of helping smugglers bring marijuana and undocumented immigrants into the U.S. for a decade. Lorne "Hammer" Jones, 50, a former Marine, received as much as $500,000 from smugglers, allowing a lavish lifestyle that included a boat, trips to Las Vegas and season tickets to San Diego Chargers games, prosecutors said. Jones had been an inspector since 1994 and worked at the San Ysidro and Otay Mesa crossings.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Now we have an idea why the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service was keeping secret an independent report of its encounters at the Mexican border. Because it has something to hide. As The Times' Brian Bennett reported last week, an independent report by the nonprofit Police Executive Research Forum sharply criticized the agency for a "lack of diligence" in investigating fatal encounters involving its agents. The report, based on internal case files of 67 shooting incidents leading to 19 deaths between January 2010 and October 2012, also faulted some of the agents' practices, including positioning themselves in the "exit path" of fleeing vehicles apparently as a pretext for opening fire in self-defense.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel and Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers and watchdog groups called Friday for tougher restrictions on the use of deadly force by U.S. border agents and more transparency in the investigation of killings, including the release of an independent audit that recommended reforms in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency's "use-of-force" policies. The comments followed a report Thursday by the Tribune Washington Bureau that revealed that a 21-page audit - which the border agency commissioned but has refused to release to the public or Congress - cited examples of border agents unnecessarily stepping in front of fleeing cars to justify firing at passengers, and responding to rock-throwing with firearms.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Alan Bersin is back at the border and on the move. On the third day of a sprint through Texas and Arizona, a law enforcement convoy zooms into Nogales. Riding in a sport utility vehicle, Bersin scans a dusty landscape that he knows well: this desert town of 20,000 with its fast-food joints and discount shops facing the pastel facades and helter-skelter skyline of Nogales, Mexico, a city of 300,000 just south of the fence. Bersin, a compact 63-year-old with the stride of a former star football player at Harvard, arrives at the Nogales station, the U.S. Border Patrol's biggest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Never lose track of the load. It was drilled into everybody who worked for Carlos “Charlie” Cuevas. His drivers, lookouts, stash house operators, dispatchers -- they all knew. When a shipment was on the move, a pair of eyes had to move with it. Cuevas had just sent a crew of seven men to the border crossing at Calexico, Calif. The load they were tracking was cocaine, concealed in a custom-made compartment inside a blue 2003 Honda Accord. The car was still on the Mexican side in a 10-lane crush of vehicles inching toward the U.S. Customs and Border Protection inspection station.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Border Patrol agents have deliberately stepped in the path of cars apparently to justify shooting at the drivers and have fired in frustration at people throwing rocks from the Mexican side of the border, according to an independent review of 67 cases that resulted in 19 deaths. The report by law enforcement experts criticized the Border Patrol for "lack of diligence" in investigating U.S. agents who had fired their weapons. It also said it was unclear whether the agency "consistently and thoroughly reviews" use-of-deadly-force incidents.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: We applied for and received Global Entry status about two years ago. We lost our Global Entry cards on our recent trip to France. We reapplied for new cards, paid our $25 and are now being told we need another interview. Is this really the case? Can we use our passport, fingerprint, etc. upon re-entry without having the card in our possession? Susan Rosenson Los Angeles Answer: If you have Global Entry, you can speed through re-entry into this country, and you also (usually)
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- The head of the U.S. Border Patrol announced new rules Friday to limit agents from shooting at moving vehicles or people throwing rocks or other objects at agents, reversing a controversial policy that has led to at least 19 deaths. Border Patrol Chief Michael J. Fisher ordered customs and border agents not to step directly in front of a moving vehicle, or use their body to block it, in order to open fire on the driver. He also barred shooting at vehicles whose occupants are fleeing from agents.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Border Patrol has restricted border agents' authority to shoot at moving vehicles or at people throwing rocks, changing a controversial policy that has contributed to at least 19 deaths since 2010. In a memo released Friday, Border Patrol Chief Michael Fisher directed border agents not to step in front of moving vehicles, nor to use their bodies to block them, in order to open fire at drivers. He also barred shooting at vehicles whose occupants are fleeing from agents.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Gil Kerlikowske on Thursday to be the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, allowing the White House "drug czar" to take on his new post overseeing the Border Patrol. Kerlikowske came to the White House as director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the job commonly known as “drug czar,” after serving as chief of police in Seattle from 2001 to 2009. He will take over an organization under fire on several fronts, including secrecy surrounding incidents in which agents shot people suspected of throwing rocks at them from the other side of the U.S.-Mexico border.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Now we have an idea why the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service was keeping secret an independent report of its encounters at the Mexican border. Because it has something to hide. As The Times' Brian Bennett reported last week, an independent report by the nonprofit Police Executive Research Forum sharply criticized the agency for a "lack of diligence" in investigating fatal encounters involving its agents. The report, based on internal case files of 67 shooting incidents leading to 19 deaths between January 2010 and October 2012, also faulted some of the agents' practices, including positioning themselves in the "exit path" of fleeing vehicles apparently as a pretext for opening fire in self-defense.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel and Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers and watchdog groups called Friday for tougher restrictions on the use of deadly force by U.S. border agents and more transparency in the investigation of killings, including the release of an independent audit that recommended reforms in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency's "use-of-force" policies. The comments followed a report Thursday by the Tribune Washington Bureau that revealed that a 21-page audit - which the border agency commissioned but has refused to release to the public or Congress - cited examples of border agents unnecessarily stepping in front of fleeing cars to justify firing at passengers, and responding to rock-throwing with firearms.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Border Patrol agents have deliberately stepped in the path of cars apparently to justify shooting at the drivers and have fired in frustration at people throwing rocks from the Mexican side of the border, according to an independent review of 67 cases that resulted in 19 deaths. The report by law enforcement experts criticized the Border Patrol for "lack of diligence" in investigating U.S. agents who had fired their weapons. It also said it was unclear whether the agency "consistently and thoroughly reviews" use-of-deadly-force incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Andrew Becker and Richard Marosi
When Luis Alarid was a child, his mother would seat him in the car while she smuggled people and drugs across the U.S.-Mexico border. She was the sweet-talking commuter, he was her cute boy, and the mother-son ploy regularly kept customs inspectors from peeking inside the trunk. FOR THE RECORD: Corruption case: An earlier version of this online article showed a photo of the San Ysidro border crossing and included a caption that stated that a Border Patrol agent who was hired there was engaged in illegal activity.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo and Richard Simon, This article has been updated, as indicated below.
TUCSON - For months, even in the 100-degree-plus desert heat, Alejandro Castear always grabbed a heavy sweater when he left his southern Arizona home. The sweater wasn't to wear, he says, but to fend off chilling memories of his time in a freezing detention center for people suspected of being in the U.S. illegally. Castear says he experienced what immigrant rights groups say is a common practice - detaining immigrants in frigid cells to pressure them to agree to deportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | Richard Marosi
A U.S. Border Patrol agent patrolling a smuggling trail in the mountains east of San Diego shot and killed a suspect Tuesday morning after being struck in the head during a rock attack, federal and San Diego County authorities said. The confrontation occurred about 6:30 a.m. on Otay Mountain, which is heavily used for illegal crossings into San Diego. Agents patrolling in SUVs and all-terrain vehicles crisscross the mountain around the clock. The agent opened fire after being hit in the face with a rock thrown by a noncitizen who was suspected of crossing the border illegally, San Diego County Sheriff's Lt. Glenn Giannantonio said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A drone on patrol for U.S. Customs and Protection made an "emergency landing" in the ocean 20 miles southwest of San Diego after experiencing a mechanical problem, officials said Tuesday. The craft has been brought back to San Diego by ship and is no longer a hazard to navigation, the Coast Guard said. The incident occurred about 11:15 p.m. Monday when operators determined that the unmanned Predator B drone "would be unable to return" Sierra Vista, Ariz., where it originated, according to a statement from Customs and Border Protection.
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