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WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
Doctors Without Borders has been ordered to cease activities in Myanmar, leaving  tens of thousands of patients without medical care, the Nobel Prize-winning aid group said Friday. Doctors Without Borders did not give a reason for the move. But local news reports said the government had taken issue with statements made by the group about sectarian violence in northern Rakhine state and accused it of bias toward the ethnic Rohingya Muslim minority. In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said it was “deeply shocked” by the suspension of its operations after 22 years in Myanmar and “extremely concerned about the fate” of patients under its care around the country.
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NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Border Patrol agents have deliberately stepped in the path of cars apparently to justify shooting at the drivers and have fired in frustration at people throwing rocks from the Mexican side of the border, according to an independent review of 67 cases that resulted in 19 deaths. The report by law enforcement experts criticized the Border Patrol for "lack of diligence" in investigating U.S. agents who had fired their weapons. It also said it was unclear whether the agency "consistently and thoroughly reviews" use-of-deadly-force incidents.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
AMADO, Ariz. - Border-area residents, upset with what they called an increased militarized presence in their community, began an effort Wednesday to monitor Border Patrol actions at a federal immigration checkpoint about 25 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Arizona. Organizers with a humanitarian aid group called People Helping People in the Border Zone have called on the Border Patrol to remove the checkpoint in Amado, a town of about 300 people. Some residents say they have to deal with unnecessary delays, harassment and sometimes abuse at the checkpoint.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Alexandra Sandels
BEIRUT - Israeli warplanes struck targets late Monday near the Lebanese-Syrian border, according to news and official accounts, but there were conflicting reports about whether the areas hit were on Syrian or Lebanese soil. The official Lebanese news agency said Israeli warplanes “launched two raids” in a mountainous area in the vicinity of the Lebanese village of Nabi Sheet. There was no comment from the Israeli government. There was also no official word on possible casualties.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HARLINGEN, Texas - They come from Central America with slips of paper sewn into their pockets bearing names they are sometimes too young to spell. Parents send them with Bibles, rosaries and small wooden crosses in their backpacks. The flood of undocumented immigrants has slowed compared to five years ago - likely due to tighter border enforcement and the economic downturn in the U.S. - but in its place is a new immigration surge even more confounding: children and teenagers traveling through the rugged border lands into south Texas, lured by the promise of safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | Richard Marosi
A U.S. Border Patrol agent patrolling a smuggling trail in the mountains east of San Diego shot and killed a suspect Tuesday morning after being struck in the head during a rock attack, federal and San Diego County authorities said. The confrontation occurred about 6:30 a.m. on Otay Mountain, which is heavily used for illegal crossings into San Diego. Agents patrolling in SUVs and all-terrain vehicles crisscross the mountain around the clock. The agent opened fire after being hit in the face with a rock thrown by a noncitizen who was suspected of crossing the border illegally, San Diego County Sheriff's Lt. Glenn Giannantonio said.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Kathleen Hennessey
MEXICO CITY - Twenty years after their countries signed a landmark regional trade agreement, the presidents of the United States, Mexico and Canada will meet this week to attempt to strengthen the economic ties envisioned in that pact, correct the omissions and find ways to expand. Trade and commerce are expected to dominate the agenda when President Obama meets with his Mexican and Canadian counterparts - President Enrique Peña Nieto and Prime Minister Stephen Harper - in the Mexican city of Toluca, just west of Mexico City, on Wednesday.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan and Kate Linthicum
CAIRO - A bomb blast ripped through a bus packed with tourists Sunday, killing at least four people near Egypt's border with Israel, security officials said, in an attack that threatened to damage the tourist economies of both countries. Three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian bus driver were killed, according to a statement from Egypt's Interior Ministry. No one has claimed responsibility, but several Israeli security experts said the location of the attack suggests it was directed at least in part at Israel.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan and Kate Linthicum, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
CAIRO - At least three people were killed Sunday and more than a dozen injured in a bomb blast near Egypt's border with Israel, according to Egyptian state media reports. The explosion occurred on a bus that was carrying 33 tourists from South Korea from the Egyptian city of St. Catherine to the Israeli border, state news agency MENA reported. The agency said at least three people were killed and 14 injured. The motivations of the attack were unknown. Israeli police spokesman Mickey Rosenfeld said the blast occurred a third of a mile from the Taba border crossing with Israel, which is near the Israeli resort city of Eilat.
WORLD
February 15, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
YANJI, China - She was a North Korean success story. For more than two decades, the woman, now 50, dabbled in various businesses at the border between China and North Korea. She sold rice. She traded foreign currency. She opened a massage parlor in China. She traveled between the two countries with relative ease and was making sufficient money to live comfortably, so much so that she rebuffed invitations to join her sister, who had defected to South Korea. But the woman, who didn't want her name used out of fear for her safety, has changed her thinking about the future since the December execution of Jang Song Taek, the uncle by marriage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Jang, 67, was long viewed as a champion of free enterprise within the nominally communist state, and his purge has rattled many North Koreans.
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