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Boredom

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SCIENCE
November 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Boredom is a lot more interesting than scientists had thought. A new study of students in Germany reveals that there are five distinct types of boredom. That's one more than researchers had expected. What's more, the newly discovered category - which they labeled “apathetic boredom” - was quite common among high school students, according to the study , published this week in the journal Motivation and Emotion. Boredom isn't just boring. It can be dangerous, either for the person who is bored or for the people around him. For instance, people who are bored are more likely to smoke, drink or use drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
November 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Boredom is a lot more interesting than scientists had thought. A new study of students in Germany reveals that there are five distinct types of boredom. That's one more than researchers had expected. What's more, the newly discovered category - which they labeled “apathetic boredom” - was quite common among high school students, according to the study , published this week in the journal Motivation and Emotion. Boredom isn't just boring. It can be dangerous, either for the person who is bored or for the people around him. For instance, people who are bored are more likely to smoke, drink or use drugs.
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OPINION
July 26, 2008
Re "The 411 to avoid boredom," Opinion, July 19 Irving Biederman states that human beings seek information to get the accompanying hit of brain opioids and therefore are obsessed with staying connected. I draw a different conclusion. Scientists have noted similar brain opioid levels in advanced meditators, who make a practice of not processing any information during meditation. A feeling of completion can be gained from integrating and then letting go of a new experience -- and this completion seems to be what actually generates the opioid reaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
When Jennifer Aniston's hair falls in a salon, everyone hears it. The trend-setting "Friends" alum chopped off her luscious locks last week, opting for a neck-skimming bob that she debuted while she was out and about in Los Angeles on Monday, according to Us Weekly . The 44-year-old "We're the Millers" star, who immortalized "The Rachel" haircut with longtime stylist Chris McMillan, said she and McMillian cut off six inches at her direction...
SPORTS
October 31, 2010 | By Mike Bresnahan
As the Lakers move through the early part of their schedule with surprisingly few playoff-caliber teams on the horizon, they might face only one legitimate challenger. Boredom. It's barely November, and the games might not get really interesting until mid-May, leaving a lot of time to ponder a lot of games against the Minnesota Timberwolves, Washington Wizards and Detroit Pistons the next two months. Assistant coach Brian Shaw , part of the franchise's last three-championship run, found plenty of ways for the Lakers to stay motivated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1988
"Idle hands are the devil's workshop," teachers were fond of saying 30 years ago as they dished out homework. Idleness, it seems, is no less a problem today than it was then, and so is boredom, the child of idleness. During the past year, idleness or boredom has been blamed, at least in part, for activities that led to the death of one San Diego area teen-ager, severe brain damage to another, several assaults and a series of burglaries and vandalism.
TRAVEL
March 2, 1986 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
A friend once described waiting at an airport as "being trapped inside a large, dirty sock." At most airports there is nothing quite as frustrating or as boring as waiting for planes to arrive or for planes to leave. Within just a few minutes, terminal boredom sets in and, for most of us, it's downhill from there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1985 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
They sit on long rows of orange and olive-drab vinyl couches, sipping coffee from Styrofoam cups, reading newspapers and books and talking with one another. In the corner, several people huddle around a black-and-white television set to watch "Sale of the Century." It is 9:30 a.m., a new day in the jury waiting room at the Van Nuys Courthouse. Four women at the back of the room, veterans of jury duty, waste no time in starting a card game called Shanghai.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
It's long been assumed — correctly — that a Marine who experiences the psychological trauma of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan has an increased chance of getting into trouble when he comes home. But two researchers at the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego have found another deployment experience that can be an even greater precursor of bad behavior later: boredom. A survey of 1,543 Marines at Camp Pendleton, Twentynine Palms, Calif., and the Marine base in Okinawa, Japan, found that the Marine most likely to disobey orders, get into physical confrontations, neglect his family or run afoul of the police is one who reports that his war zone deployment was marked by boredom.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | Jack Smith
Alan Caruba, founder of The Boring Institute, has published a book called "Boring Stuff: How to Spot It & How to Avoid It." He has sent it to me with a note that begins: "Boredom is so much a part of our lives that it's easy to overlook." He says he started the institute as a media spoof, but since then he has been touched by the more serious aspects of his subject. "Boredom lends itself wonderfully to humor, but clearly it has a very serious side to it.
SPORTS
October 14, 2012 | T.J. Simers
I had such expectations, the cast sounding terrific, the early Oscar buzz. Then I went and paid to see the worst movie ever made - dumbfounding how anyone ever agreed to make it - an idiotic, stupefying, colossal waste of time. I sat there watching "The Master," knowing I should walk out but figuring something just had to happen because they would never torture folks like this. But it never did, which brings me to UCLA's game against Utah, yet another idiotic, stupefying, colossal waste of time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
According to artist Jenny Holzer, who is in town this week for the opening of her show at L&M Arts, boredom has a way of just not letting up. "BOREDOM MAKES YOU DO CRAZY THINGS," reads a line projected at night on a gallery facade. The line was programmed to alternate randomly with three other sayings, known in the artist's lingo as truisms. "It is supposed to be random," Holzer said during a visit to the site. "But last night boredom kept coming back. " Holzer said she has not had a gallery show in L.A. "in like a thousand years.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The fallout from the Prince Harry Vegas romp continued Thursday with reports that the royal family was trying to stymie further publication of the nude photos taken of the prince. Meanwhile, Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte said he was glad he wasn't invited to play strip billiards in the prince's Vegas hotel suite. "He's a really nice guy," Lochte told "Today's" Matt Lauer of Prince Harry. Lochte had frequented the same pool party in Las Vegas as the prince, who asked to meet him. PHOTOS: Embarrassed in Las Vegas Lochte was happy to oblige and was charmed with the prince, who challenged him to a race.
HEALTH
January 30, 2012 | By Robert Oliphant, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My name is Bob, and I know what it's like to be flat on your back for more than two months. My first encounter was for a form of arthritis called Reiter's syndrome - a three-month stay in a Veterans Affairs hospital marked by boredom and depression. Fifty years later, I was confined again, by a broken hip, but this time my stay turned out to be surprisingly productive. Rhythm: It was purely by chance one night that I attempted to keep track of a basic rhythm with my left hand while beating out the rhythm of the words to "Jingle Bells" with my right.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Leon Logothetis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
“10,000 miles of adventuring bliss through deserts, mountains and steppe tackled in a car your Granny would use for shopping. The Mongol Rally is hurling yourself at one-third of the Earth's surface in woefully unsuitable vehicles to see what happens.” --Mongol Rally HQ I remember the precise moment I decided how I was going to spend the summer. It was 9:24 p.m., and I was lounging at home, feeling sorry for myself. Boredom had set in. Boredom and I are not friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2011
BOOKS Well, here's one way to get around reading the book: Go see monologues performed from "The Pale King," David Foster Wallace's posthumous release about IRS agents. Hosted by Los Angeles Times book critic David Ulin, passages of the tome concerning the bleakest corners of bureaucracy and boredom will be illuminated by Henry Rollins, Josh Radnor ("How I Met Your Mother"), Nick Offerman ("Parks and Recreation") and Megan Mullally ("Will & Grace"). Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1999 | ELYSA GARDNER
If Petty is one of the most predictable artists around, he's also among the most reliable. On his new album (due in stores Tuesday), the 46-year-old singer-songwriter and his longtime band serve up taut, guitar-driven songs that are as instantly familiar, utterly unsurprising and easily satisfying as a good steak dinner. That's not to say that this music could or should be dismissed as a guilty pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2003 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
The inexorable groan of the school year. No. 2 pencils and, oh, so many standardized bubbles to bubble, carpools to wait for, homework assignments to ignore and then endure. The same Tupperware lunch every, single, day. Alarm at 8. Burnt toast. Loading up the backpack. Through it all, the dream of summer. A lust for sloth. Every morning a Sunday morning. To be nearly naked and irresponsible, too hot to move except to smile an indolent smile and sip a lime-colored cooler!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Luis, Ariz. -- The border fence ran right in front of Jeff Byerly's post, a straight line of steel that stretched beyond town and deep into the desert. As a U.S. Border Patrol agent on America's front line, Byerly's job was to stop anyone from scaling the barrier. Hours into his midnight shift, his stare was still fixed, but all was quiet. He pounded energy drinks. He walked around his government vehicle. On the other side of the fence, the bars in the Mexican town of San Luis Rio Colorado closed, and only the sound of a passing car broke the silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011 | Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): You will add an exciting appointment to your calendar. Make sure you tell others who might be affected by this commitment. Taurus (April 20-May 20): There is a limit to how much you can improve a situation without making a significant change. And yet handling small details helps you wrap your head around the next move. Gemini (May 21-June 21): The need to feel important is in everyone to some degree. What makes you feel important is not the same thing as what makes another person feel important.
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