Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBoris Karloff
IN THE NEWS

Boris Karloff

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
January 19, 1992
For a book and TV special on Boris Karloff, I would welcome any contributions on him, especially on the child actress who played the murdered girl in Frankenstein--Marilyn Harris. MICHAEL POINTON, c/o The Masked Corp, 6-7 Great Chapel St., London W1, United Kingdom
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Some actors have faces that are known everywhere. Once seen, never forgotten. Boris Karloff earned one of those faces by playing the original Frankenstein, but he had a sizable 75-film career, mostly as a bad guy, behind him before he took on that role. A new DVD collection from TCM, "Karloff: Criminal Kind," showcases three of the best of those early films: "The Guilty Generation," "Behind the Mask" and Howard Hawks' classic "The Criminal Code. " Bruce Lee was just achieving international stardom when he died at age 32 in 1973.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Some actors have faces that are known everywhere. Once seen, never forgotten. Boris Karloff earned one of those faces by playing the original Frankenstein, but he had a sizable 75-film career, mostly as a bad guy, behind him before he took on that role. A new DVD collection from TCM, "Karloff: Criminal Kind," showcases three of the best of those early films: "The Guilty Generation," "Behind the Mask" and Howard Hawks' classic "The Criminal Code. " Bruce Lee was just achieving international stardom when he died at age 32 in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
Robert Redford Before his superstar days, Redford appear in the Oct. 20, 1961, episode, "First-Class Mouliak," directed by William Conrad of "Cannon" fame Sam Peckinpah "The Wild Bunch" director cut his teeth in TV. He directed the "Mon Petit Chou" episode that aired Nov. 24, 1961, with guest Lee Marvin Boris Karloff Karloff joined fellow movie monsters Lon Chaney Jr. and Peter Lorre in the "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
William Henry Pratt would have been 100 years old last Nov. 23 and it seems ironic that that most English of names (suggesting as it does small tidy gardens and furled umbrellas) should have been transmuted into Boris Karloff, attached to that ostensibly Transylvanian master of the macabre. Karloff, who died in 1969, is being memorialized Jan. 18, with a centennial retrospective organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences at the academy's theater in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
Robert Redford Before his superstar days, Redford appear in the Oct. 20, 1961, episode, "First-Class Mouliak," directed by William Conrad of "Cannon" fame Sam Peckinpah "The Wild Bunch" director cut his teeth in TV. He directed the "Mon Petit Chou" episode that aired Nov. 24, 1961, with guest Lee Marvin Boris Karloff Karloff joined fellow movie monsters Lon Chaney Jr. and Peter Lorre in the "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
. . . The late Boris Karloff materializes for a "special guest appearance" in the horror spoof, "Transylvania Twist"--upcoming from MGM/UA Home Video. Starring Robert Vaughn and Teri Copley, the pic features Karloff via unused footage from "The Terror" (1963), directed by Roger Corman. Coincidentally, Corman's Concorde Pictures produces "Transylvania."
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | JON NALICK
"Frankenstein Unbound," 1990, directed by Roger Corman. 86 minutes. In New Los Angeles in the year 2031, a monster is created by a scientist named Buchanan. Based on a novel by Brian Aldiss, this is an interesting tale of science without conscience and a monster that has far more in common with Mary Shelley's literary creation (an intelligent being who is wrongfully spurned) than the violent savage of the 1931 black-and-white film starring Boris Karloff.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Boris Karloff may have created two of cinema's greatest screen ghouls — the Frankenstein monster and the Mummy — but in real life, he didn't even like to use the word horror. "He preferred the word terror to horror," says his only child, Sara Karloff. "He preferred the word thrill to chill, when [a story] went right up the spine of the viewer and kept them on the edge of their seat. He was opposed to gore of any sort and he really thought anything that dumped either the solution or the gore into the audiences' lap was an insult to the intelligence of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009
I haven't quite been able to wrap my head around the concept that today's moviegoers are embracing horror pictures as a means of finding "release . . . or at least distraction from the real threats we face" ["The Horror . . . the Horror," Jan. 25]. This certainly could have been true in the glory days of Universal monster mashes featuring the Frankenstein Monster, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and other "supernatural" figures, but not in the 21st century, when torture-porn films are as fact-based as front-page murder stories and many times more unspeakably awful.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris Karloff made him a monster-movie star. Elsa Lanchester was his bride. He's co-starred with Gene Wilder, the Wolf Man and Dracula, not to mention Abbott and Costello. He's been played by everyone from Bela Lugosi to Robert De Niro. Of course, he is Frankenstein's monster, the granddaddy of Hollywood creatures.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TNT's is the latest. Boris Karloff's is the most famous. But over the past 80 years, there have been numerous adaptations of Mary Shelley's 1818 novel. The first screen "Frankenstein" was produced way back in 1910. The 16-minute version, which starred Charles Ogle as the monster, was filmed at Edison Studios in New Jersey. The first full-length version, "Life Without a Soul," was released six years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009
I haven't quite been able to wrap my head around the concept that today's moviegoers are embracing horror pictures as a means of finding "release . . . or at least distraction from the real threats we face" ["The Horror . . . the Horror," Jan. 25]. This certainly could have been true in the glory days of Universal monster mashes featuring the Frankenstein Monster, the Wolf Man, the Mummy and other "supernatural" figures, but not in the 21st century, when torture-porn films are as fact-based as front-page murder stories and many times more unspeakably awful.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | JON NALICK
"Frankenstein Unbound," 1990, directed by Roger Corman. 86 minutes. In New Los Angeles in the year 2031, a monster is created by a scientist named Buchanan. Based on a novel by Brian Aldiss, this is an interesting tale of science without conscience and a monster that has far more in common with Mary Shelley's literary creation (an intelligent being who is wrongfully spurned) than the violent savage of the 1931 black-and-white film starring Boris Karloff.
BOOKS
January 19, 1992
For a book and TV special on Boris Karloff, I would welcome any contributions on him, especially on the child actress who played the murdered girl in Frankenstein--Marilyn Harris. MICHAEL POINTON, c/o The Masked Corp, 6-7 Great Chapel St., London W1, United Kingdom
Los Angeles Times Articles
|