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Boris N Yeltsin

NEWS
September 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin telephoned President Clinton to deny involvement in corruption and to complain that people with "political motivations" in both Russia and the United States were exploiting a widening financial scandal to damage the relationship between the two countries, White House officials said. Yeltsin offered to help the U.S. in its probe of alleged Russian money laundering, the officials added.
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NEWS
September 8, 1999 | From Reuters
President Boris N. Yeltsin cracked the whip in Moscow on Tuesday after Russia's generals were caught off guard by a new Islamic rebel onslaught in the southern republic of Dagestan. Chairing a meeting of his Security Council, Yeltsin described the rebels in Dagestan as degenerates and murderers and told his generals to crush them. Earlier, he had lashed out at the generals themselves for being unprepared for a devastating car bomb attack and a major new rebel advance over the weekend.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Boris N. Yeltsin has unveiled Russia's new Cabinet, giving Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin virtually the same team as his predecessor. The reappointments were largely expected, as Putin, a former KGB spy named prime minister because of his loyalty to the president, had said he expected few changes. First Deputy Prime Ministers Nikolai Y. Aksyonenko and Viktor B. Khristenko, Finance Minister Mikhail Kasyanov, Defense Minister Igor D. Sergeyev and Foreign Minister Igor S.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Vladimir V. Putin won confirmation Monday as Russia's fifth prime minister since early last year, and the ex-KGB agent must now try to revive a depressed economy, crush a rebel uprising and remain on good terms with a notoriously fickle president. Putin, 46, will have fewer than 12 months in office to tackle the monumental problems that have plagued Russia throughout the decade, and expectations are low among a population grown cynical after so many political upheavals.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
So who will Russian President Boris ("off with their heads") N. Yeltsin appoint as his next prime minister, once he tires of Vladimir Putin? His horse? Mikhail Baryshnikov? Lavrenti Beria, Stalin's long-dead KGB henchman? Yeltsin's sacking on Monday of Sergei Stepashin, his fourth prime minister in the last 17 months and his appointment of Putin, a low-profile Russian spymaster, seem like fodder for Jay Leno.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some cryptic billboards have appeared on Moscow's streets, ones that advertise no product and contain a message so subtle--but sinister--that few of the people who pass by them each day pick up their meaning. In fact, the signs aren't meant for everyone. They're actually giant postcards to the country's most powerful people: The Family, as the Yeltsin clan is known. The riddle is, who is sending them?
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday described Russia's relationship with the United States and NATO as "difficult" and pointedly endorsed recent Russian military moves in Kosovo and over the Atlantic that alarmed the West. Before a group of military brass at the Kremlin, Yeltsin praised a Russian exercise two weeks ago in which two TU-95 Bear bombers headed uncomfortably close to NATO airspace, flying within 60 miles of Iceland before being turned back by U.S. jets.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When serial killer Vladimir N. Retunsky was sentenced to death last month for the murder of eight young women and girls, the victims' families and friends offered to carry out his punishment on the spot. "Give him to us!" they shouted in court as a panel of judges handed down the sentence. "We'll tear him to pieces!" Under heavy police guard, the murderer was hauled off to death row, but he wasn't there for long. Earlier this month, President Boris N.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin survived a one-day jaunt outside Russia on Sunday, walking with an unsteady gait but displaying no unsteadiness of purpose as he took his seat among the world's most powerful statesmen. Kremlin aides claimed a number of successes for their boss at the Group of 8 summit, including pledges from President Clinton to support forgiving some of Russia's Soviet-era debts and tying development of a U.S. missile defense system to other arms control measures.
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