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Boris Said

WORLD
February 21, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Serbs and ethnic Albanians trying to resolve one of the toughest disputes left from the Balkan wars of the 1990s met in Vienna to discuss whether Kosovo should be independent or remain part of Serbia-Montenegro. Lutfi Haziri, head of the ethnic Albanian delegation, said independence was coming. But Serbian President Boris Tadic said in Belgrade that talks should focus on improving the lives of Kosovo's ethnic Serb minority. The U.N.
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SPORTS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Two-time Wimbledon tennis champion Boris Becker said he will defend his title at the $525,000 Players' International Tennis Championship at Montreal's Jarry Tennis Stadium from Aug. 8 to 16. Becker, currently ranked second by the Assn. of Tennis Professionals, defeated two-time reigning Australian Open champion and world-ranked No. 2 Stefan Edberg in last year's final at Toronto's National Tennis Centre.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | United Press International
A Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman said Tuesday that two Soviet military advisers reported missing after a Chadian attack on a Libyan air base earlier this month were killed in action. Boris Pyadyshev said the two advisers were in southern Libya near the disputed area of Aozou. The Libyan base 60 miles inside the border with Chad, where the Soviets are believed to have been stationed, was attacked and overrun by Chadian government troops on Sept. 5.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
It was a summer evening in 1933 when the two young men found what they were searching for: the entrance to a centuries-old underground tunnel within sight of the red Kremlin walls. As they crept underground toward Moscow's seat of power, lighting their way with a lantern, the men believed they might find Ivan the Terrible's legendary library of gold-covered books. Instead, they found five skeletons, a passageway sometimes so narrow that they had to file through singly and, within a few hundred yards of the Kremlin, a rusted steel door they could not open.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Scientists have figured out how to grow human stem cells into "cerebral organoids" - blobs of tissue that mimic the anatomy of the developing brain. The advance, reported online Wednesday by the journal Nature, won't allow scientists to grow disembodied brains in laboratory vats, said study leader Juergen Knoblich, a stem cell researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Science in Vienna. But it does offer researchers an unprecedented view of human brain anatomy, he said.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A Soviet official said Wednesday that imprisoned Jewish activist Josef Begun had received a pardon, but Moscow dissident circles had no confirmation that Begun or either of two other dissidents had been set free. Samuel L. Zivs, head of the Soviet Anti-Zionist Committee, said in Geneva that Soviet President Andrei A. Gromyko or one of his deputies signed an unconditional pardon for Begun on Tuesday, and that the activist should have been freed Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1992
Once upon a time there was a brave and bald man; his name was Mikhail. He was a chauffeur of a big, rusty old Russian limousine. During his days, it was hard to drive, for there were red lights and stop signs everywhere. But Mikhail drove proudly through them all. One day in August he got busted by a big, bad bear. The bear held Mikhail captive in a faraway town. But Mikhail had a friend named Boris, who was equally brave and strong. Boris came to his rescue and in return he got to ride in Mikhail's big, old limousine.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Moscow International Stock Exchange hopes to begin trading in a limited number of government bonds in January, Russian Finance Minister Boris Fyodorov said today. The government of Russia, the largest and richest of the 15 Soviet republics, was among 20 organizations and individuals that founded the exchange last month. "We would like to take in the first place a very primitive step," Fyodorov said of the decision to start by trading bonds before gradually introducing securities.
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