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Boris Yeltsin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1998
Re "Yeltsin Rises From Sickbed to Clean House," Dec. 8: Big deal. Women do that all the time. SUSAN ANDRES Los Angeles
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OPINION
April 24, 2007
BORIS YELTSIN would have ranked among the best of czars or commissars. It was Russia's great tragedy that, instead, he was a would-be democrat. Today, we mourn the Russia that Yeltsin could have built. We pause to honor those who suffered, and still suffer, for the mistakes of a leader who meant so well and ruled so ineptly. The pessimism of his era in office was perhaps best summed up by one of his many failed prime ministers, Viktor S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1993
I believe I have the solution to the United States' and Russia's problems. Both countries need to trade presidents. President Clinton is fighting the current in his attempt to socialize major American industries such as health care. President Yeltsin is fighting the current in his attempt to privatize major Russian industries. STEVEN A. SILVER Encino
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | Kate O'Hare, Special to The Times
Which is harder: turning a bodybuilder-actor into a governor or an alcoholic into a president? According to political consultant George Gorton, who advised Arnold Schwarzenegger during his recent successful gubernatorial bid in California and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin in his run for reelection, each has its challenges, but only one could get you killed. "Entirely different experiences," Gorton said. "You're dealing with the oligarchs in Russia. It can be frightening.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
There are a couple of unsolved problems in "Spinning Boris," a pretty good Showtime movie about Russia's 1996 presidential election and the three American "spin doctors" who were clandestinely hired to help the spectacularly low-polling Boris Yeltsin. Just how much these Pete Wilson campaign vets actually had to do with Yeltsin's eventual victory -- sorry to give away the ending -- remains debatable, the subject of ongoing claim and counterclaim.
OPINION
November 4, 2003
Re "Russian Events Leave White House Wary," Nov. 1: Granted that President Vladimir Putin's actions may affect free markets in Russia, but letting crooked executives of Enron and WorldCom, etc., go unpunished also leaves free markets all over the world in disarray. It would be appropriate for the White House to move these executives into hard labor camps and out of their multimillion-dollar homes, promptly. B.V. Bhimani Winnetka The Russian government freezes some assets of a corporation and prosecutes and jails its executive for fraud before it sells its assets and distributes the dividends -- applying proven Stalinist preventive principles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2000
Our hearts go out to the men trapped in a Russian sub at the bottom of the sea (Aug. 15). But then we ask, "Why do we still have nuclear submarines?" They actually decrease our national security. In January 1995 Russian radar picked up a scientific missile over Norway. The Russians concluded that it had been launched by an American submarine and handed Boris Yeltsin the black box to launch the counterattack. Yeltsin had minutes to act or lose his missiles (launch on warning). In those few minutes they concluded that the missile was not headed in their direction.
BOOKS
May 14, 2000 | JACK F. MATLOCK JR., Jack F. Matlock Jr. is the author of "Autopsy on an Empire: The American Ambassador's Account of the Collapse of the Soviet Union."
"There is nothing more difficult to plan or more uncertain of success or more dangerous to carry out than an attempt to introduce new institutions," Niccolo Machiavelli advised his prince in the early 16th century. Boris Yeltsin seems to have understood the difficulty, because he wrote shortly after becoming president of Russia that "[n]ot a single reform effort in Russia has ever been completed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2000
Re "Putin Rolls to Victory, Avoiding a Runoff," March 27: There was no way ex-KGB spy Vladimir V. Putin was going to lose or even face a runoff. Anyone who believes that Putin will weed out the Russian Mafia that is so deeply entrenched in the economy will probably be interested in some Florida swampland. This country has not been able to rid our society of certain Mafia interests (gambling, drugs, prostitution) in 50 years. Putin is far from being stupid, and he knows that if he were to go after the Russian Mafia, he would not be alive to celebrate his next birthday.
NEWS
January 1, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin was Russia's first democratically elected president. That much is indisputable. Under his leadership, communism was dismantled and the country set out to build a new economic and political system. That is also indisputable. But Russia's future remains cloudy, and so does Yeltsin's legacy. Since earning reelection in 1996, Yeltsin has been obsessed with how he will go down in history.
NEWS
January 1, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The snow fell softly all day in Moscow. It fell on Boris Yeltsin as he left the Kremlin as an ordinary citizen. It fell on shoppers slipping through the slushy streets searching for last-minute holiday gifts. And it fell on 10-year-old Katya Keymakh as she twirled boldly if unevenly on the ice at a central Moscow skating pond, watched proudly by her videotaping father, Vladimir. "It was time for Yeltsin to go," the 36-year-old said, brushing the snow from his lens.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, Tatyana Dyachenko worked at the famous Salyut design bureau, plotting trajectories for the communications satellites and the Mir space station. In 1994, she took a post at an obscure bank that specialized in trading in gems and precious metals. But these jobs were merely preparation for her true calling: helping her father govern Russia. Today, the reclusive 39-year-old mathematician is widely viewed as the power behind the Kremlin throne.
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