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Bosnia Herzegovina Defense

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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Britain and France apparently on board, the Clinton Administration struggled to win international backing Thursday for massive air bombardment in Bosnia-Herzegovina to stem the Bosnian Serb threat against Gorazde, a campaign the United States wants to press even if the rebel Serbs retaliate by seizing hostages. Defense Secretary William J. Perry outlined Washington's objective in stark terms: If the Bosnian Serbs do not back off from any plans to overrun the U.N.
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NEWS
April 18, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil-rich Arab states in the Persian Gulf region have promised to contribute $100 million to train and equip the fledgling army of Bosnia's Muslim-Croat federation, reviving a U.S.-backed initiative that had been stalled by European opposition to sending more arms to the volatile Balkans, the Clinton administration announced Wednesday. "This is a crucial turning point," a senior State Department official told reporters. "We now have the funding to move ahead quickly."
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NEWS
April 18, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil-rich Arab states in the Persian Gulf region have promised to contribute $100 million to train and equip the fledgling army of Bosnia's Muslim-Croat federation, reviving a U.S.-backed initiative that had been stalled by European opposition to sending more arms to the volatile Balkans, the Clinton administration announced Wednesday. "This is a crucial turning point," a senior State Department official told reporters. "We now have the funding to move ahead quickly."
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's bid to muster international help to arm and train the Bosnian government army received a serious setback Thursday as several key European countries served notice that they will not provide significant help. With a meeting of potential donors scheduled for Ankara, Turkey, today, France, Britain, Germany and the Netherlands have all declined to contribute substantially. Other potential donors, such as Saudi Arabia, have signaled that they too may hold back. U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary-designate Les Aspin told senators Thursday that "there's more of a national interest at stake in Bosnia than there is in Somalia" and reinforced a growing belief among some that the incoming Administration may have a greater willingness to use force in the conflict in the Balkans.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of key senators returning from military briefings in Europe said Thursday that U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia must be reinforced with heavy arms and more troops to defend themselves from reprisals if President Clinton orders air strikes. "These forces need to be beefed up," said Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.). "They are so lightly armed now they are, in effect, hostages.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's bid to muster international help to arm and train the Bosnian government army received a serious setback Thursday as several key European countries served notice that they will not provide significant help. With a meeting of potential donors scheduled for Ankara, Turkey, today, France, Britain, Germany and the Netherlands have all declined to contribute substantially. Other potential donors, such as Saudi Arabia, have signaled that they too may hold back. U.S.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Europe on Tuesday hoping to persuade Washington's NATO allies to share in the air defense of safe areas in Bosnia-Herzegovina. A senior Administration official said Christopher will ask the allies to join the United States in providing air cover for U.N.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel Serbs in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Thursday accused Muslims in Srebrenica of spiriting weapons and fighters out of the devastated town to evade U.N. efforts to disarm them. After senior officers of the U.N. peacekeeping mission to the former Yugoslav republics said that Srebrenica had been "demilitarized," rebel warlords protested that too few weapons had been turned in. "The Muslims have given up a ridiculously small quantity of weapons, mostly outdated and unusable," Bosnian Serb Gen.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | Reuters
Bosnia-Herzegovina will sue Britain in the World Court for violating a 1948 convention against genocide by opposing the lifting of a U.N. arms embargo that it says prevents the former Yugoslav republic from defending itself, Bosnian U.N. envoy Muhamed Sacirbey told a news conference Monday. Bosnia will also charge that Britain, as a permanent member of the Security Council, "illegally imposed and maintained an arms embargo" against it in violation of Article 51 of the U.N.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Britain and France apparently on board, the Clinton Administration struggled to win international backing Thursday for massive air bombardment in Bosnia-Herzegovina to stem the Bosnian Serb threat against Gorazde, a campaign the United States wants to press even if the rebel Serbs retaliate by seizing hostages. Defense Secretary William J. Perry outlined Washington's objective in stark terms: If the Bosnian Serbs do not back off from any plans to overrun the U.N.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | Reuters
Bosnia-Herzegovina will sue Britain in the World Court for violating a 1948 convention against genocide by opposing the lifting of a U.N. arms embargo that it says prevents the former Yugoslav republic from defending itself, Bosnian U.N. envoy Muhamed Sacirbey told a news conference Monday. Bosnia will also charge that Britain, as a permanent member of the Security Council, "illegally imposed and maintained an arms embargo" against it in violation of Article 51 of the U.N.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Europe on Tuesday hoping to persuade Washington's NATO allies to share in the air defense of safe areas in Bosnia-Herzegovina. A senior Administration official said Christopher will ask the allies to join the United States in providing air cover for U.N.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of key senators returning from military briefings in Europe said Thursday that U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia must be reinforced with heavy arms and more troops to defend themselves from reprisals if President Clinton orders air strikes. "These forces need to be beefed up," said Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.). "They are so lightly armed now they are, in effect, hostages.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel Serbs in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Thursday accused Muslims in Srebrenica of spiriting weapons and fighters out of the devastated town to evade U.N. efforts to disarm them. After senior officers of the U.N. peacekeeping mission to the former Yugoslav republics said that Srebrenica had been "demilitarized," rebel warlords protested that too few weapons had been turned in. "The Muslims have given up a ridiculously small quantity of weapons, mostly outdated and unusable," Bosnian Serb Gen.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary-designate Les Aspin told senators Thursday that "there's more of a national interest at stake in Bosnia than there is in Somalia" and reinforced a growing belief among some that the incoming Administration may have a greater willingness to use force in the conflict in the Balkans.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
A former Bosnian Serb police commander was flown to The Hague on Monday, hours after his arrest by NATO peacekeepers in Bosnia, to stand trial on charges of enslaving and raping Bosnian Muslim women during the 1992-1995 war. Radomir Kovac, 38, was detained early Monday in his apartment in Foca in southeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina.
MAGAZINE
January 31, 1993
The 9-month-old attempt to force "ethnic cleansing" on the population of Bosnia-Herzegovina has produced waves of shocking images. First, the photographs of skeletal Muslim men behind barbed wire in Serbian-held camps and the ruined, beseiged city of Sarajevo, where the onset of winter has made the battle even more deadly. And then reports on the fate of women and children, who compose three-quarters of the estimated 2.5 million people who have been forced from their homes in the conflict.
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