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Bosnia Herzegovina Government Officials

NEWS
November 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Gen. Ratko Mladic, an indicted war crimes suspect, defied his superiors by announcing that he will not follow orders to step down as Bosnian Serb army commander. Mladic's challenge to Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic came as senior army commanders snubbed a new military leadership installed by Plavsic. Mladic voiced his defiance through Gen. Milan Gvero, his top deputy, who was fired over the weekend with Mladic and his entire general staff.
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NEWS
November 10, 1996 | Times Wire Services
NATO and Western mediators said Saturday they would "wait and see" if Bosnian Serb leaders are able to carry out a decision to dismiss Serb army chief Ratko Mladic, an accused war criminal. "We don't know what it is going to mean in substantive terms," said Maj. Simon Haselock, spokesman for the NATO-led peace force. Haselock spoke after Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic announced she had replaced Mladic and other top generals.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A ship carrying $100 million in U.S. military equipment for Bosnia's Muslim-Croat federation moved away from the port of Ploce in neighboring Croatia without unloading its cargo as U.S. and Bosnian officials attempted to work out political disputes. A key dispute is over Washington's demand that the federation fire its deputy defense minister, Hasan Cengic, whom it suspects has maintained close ties to Iran. The federation appeared to be ignoring that demand.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After weeks of international wrangling to force them to sit together, the three members of this nation's new joint presidency met here Monday for the first time since their recent election--and for the first time since war made them bitter enemies. The presidency is one of the crucial, overarching institutions aimed at loosely joining the war-torn country's two halves, the Muslim-Croat federation and the Bosnian Serb Republic.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to extraordinary U.S. pressure, Radovan Karadzic on Friday "relinquished the office" of president of Republika Srpska and of his hard-line political party, but he again dodged efforts to deliver him to justice. American special envoy Richard C. Holbrooke--brought out of retirement especially to accomplish the task of sidelining Karadzic--and other international officials congratulated themselves on the deal and declared that Bosnia's crucial elections can now go ahead.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Clinton has decided to send his former peace negotiator for Bosnia, Richard C. Holbrooke, back to the Balkans to pressure Serbia to remove two Bosnian Serb leaders from power, a U.S. official said Saturday. Holbrooke plans to fly to Belgrade to meet with the president of Serbia, Slobodan Milosevic, to warn him that the United States is serious about implementing all parts of the Dayton, Ohio, peace agreement, the official said.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ines Milicic remembers the telephone conversation well. It came at the start of the Balkans war, when fierce fighting between Serbs and Croats had erupted in Croatia. Biljana Plavsic, then a Serbian member of the collective multiethnic presidency in Bosnia-Herzegovina, called her Croatian friend with a somber warning: Go visit your son in the United States. And don't come back, for you might be harmed. "She said, 'Why don't you leave?
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl Bildt learned a painful lesson over the weekend: Be careful what you ask for. You may get it. The Swedish diplomat, who is in charge of civilian aspects of the Bosnian peace accord, twisted arms for months to get Radovan Karadzic to relinquish his powers as the Bosnian Serbs' president. After a lot of tough words and threats of a Monday ultimatum, Bildt got his wish: Karadzic signed a document, prepared by Bildt's office, formally transferring his duties to a trusted deputy.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radovan Karadzic, an indicted war crimes suspect who has repeatedly foiled international attempts to topple him, has handed over all powers of the so-called Bosnian Serb presidency to a hard-line loyalist, Western officials announced Sunday.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pilgrimages began early this year. Ambassadors who had never set foot in Serb-controlled Bosnia came calling, as did Western bankers and once-banished aid workers. Their not-secret, yet subversive, mission was to encourage an embryonic opposition to Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, an indicted war crimes suspect. They hoped to build an alternative capital here to Pale, his wartime stronghold, populated with hard-liners. Initially, it looked good.
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