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Bosnia Herzegovina Government Officials

NEWS
October 1, 1996 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After weeks of international wrangling to force them to sit together, the three members of this nation's new joint presidency met here Monday for the first time since their recent election--and for the first time since war made them bitter enemies. The presidency is one of the crucial, overarching institutions aimed at loosely joining the war-torn country's two halves, the Muslim-Croat federation and the Bosnian Serb Republic.
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NEWS
July 20, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to extraordinary U.S. pressure, Radovan Karadzic on Friday "relinquished the office" of president of Republika Srpska and of his hard-line political party, but he again dodged efforts to deliver him to justice. American special envoy Richard C. Holbrooke--brought out of retirement especially to accomplish the task of sidelining Karadzic--and other international officials congratulated themselves on the deal and declared that Bosnia's crucial elections can now go ahead.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Clinton has decided to send his former peace negotiator for Bosnia, Richard C. Holbrooke, back to the Balkans to pressure Serbia to remove two Bosnian Serb leaders from power, a U.S. official said Saturday. Holbrooke plans to fly to Belgrade to meet with the president of Serbia, Slobodan Milosevic, to warn him that the United States is serious about implementing all parts of the Dayton, Ohio, peace agreement, the official said.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ines Milicic remembers the telephone conversation well. It came at the start of the Balkans war, when fierce fighting between Serbs and Croats had erupted in Croatia. Biljana Plavsic, then a Serbian member of the collective multiethnic presidency in Bosnia-Herzegovina, called her Croatian friend with a somber warning: Go visit your son in the United States. And don't come back, for you might be harmed. "She said, 'Why don't you leave?
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl Bildt learned a painful lesson over the weekend: Be careful what you ask for. You may get it. The Swedish diplomat, who is in charge of civilian aspects of the Bosnian peace accord, twisted arms for months to get Radovan Karadzic to relinquish his powers as the Bosnian Serbs' president. After a lot of tough words and threats of a Monday ultimatum, Bildt got his wish: Karadzic signed a document, prepared by Bildt's office, formally transferring his duties to a trusted deputy.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radovan Karadzic, an indicted war crimes suspect who has repeatedly foiled international attempts to topple him, has handed over all powers of the so-called Bosnian Serb presidency to a hard-line loyalist, Western officials announced Sunday.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pilgrimages began early this year. Ambassadors who had never set foot in Serb-controlled Bosnia came calling, as did Western bankers and once-banished aid workers. Their not-secret, yet subversive, mission was to encourage an embryonic opposition to Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, an indicted war crimes suspect. They hoped to build an alternative capital here to Pale, his wartime stronghold, populated with hard-liners. Initially, it looked good.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia agreed Sunday to go ahead with Bosnian elections by mid-September even if indicted war crimes suspects Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic remain at large. U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher persuaded Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic to drop his earlier demand that the two Bosnian Serb leaders be arrested and sent to the international tribunal at The Hague for trial before elections are held. The U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic on Saturday again prevailed over the West's attempts to sideline him by choosing a new hard-line prime minister who immediately advocated the national ethnic partition that peacemakers are struggling to avoid. In an emergency session, Karadzic's parliament ratified Gojko Klickovic, who replaces a man who had been championed by international mediators as a moderate alternative to those Bosnian Serb leaders who resist key elements of a U.S.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a showdown that could influence the success or failure of the Bosnian peace accord, the moderate Bosnian Serb prime minister fired by Radovan Karadzic refused Thursday to go quietly. And NATO's top guns--the political ones, at least--rallied to his defense, turning quickly to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to demand help in eliminating Karadzic, an indicted war crimes suspect, from Bosnia's turbulent political scene.
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