Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBosnia Herzegovina Military Aid
IN THE NEWS

Bosnia Herzegovina Military Aid

NEWS
September 2, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scores of prominent public figures--including former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and former Secretary of State George P. Shultz--added their weight Wednesday to mounting pressure on President Clinton to bomb Serbian positions in the former Yugoslav federation.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia removed the last legal obstacle Thursday to the calling of air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina by U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali when it dropped its insistence that he seek new Security Council approval before he acts. Russian Ambassador Yuli Vorontsov told reporters before he met with other ambassadors of the Security Council that his government was not trying to prevent North Atlantic Treaty Organization planes from bombing Bosnian Serb positions.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N.-negotiated cease-fire between Bosnian Serb and Muslim factions in Sarajevo went into effect as scheduled Thursday, but the truce was shattered briefly just before midnight when two artillery shells crashed into the city, accompanied by a barrage of machine-gun fire. U.S. and U.N.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While diplomats wrangled and snow fell on anguished Sarajevo last week, NATO planners here wrote combat orders for a mission that would launch the 16-nation alliance into uncharted waters. A U.S.-West European partnership that stared down the Soviet bear for over 40 years without firing a shot prepared with exquisite detail to unleash a fearsome armada of planes against any Serbian gun positions still besieging the Bosnian capital.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its European allies began gearing up Wednesday for possible air strikes in Bosnia, using allied aircraft already in the region and equipped for nighttime bombing, and laser-guided munitions designed to minimize civilian casualties.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western defense ministers grudgingly agreed in principle Wednesday to provide limited military support for the new allied plan for ending the fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina, but they insisted that sponsors of the proposal first hammer out more clearly what they really want to accomplish.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali held back Wednesday from ordering immediate air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, arguing that they would be useless without a ground offensive that the United Nations is now too weak to mount. The secretary general's decision, announced in a report to the Security Council, came despite the pressure of a NATO summit communique a week ago that threatened air strikes and called on the United Nations to draw up urgent plans for ordering them.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian soldiers left Mt. Igman by entire busloads Wednesday, and U.N. officials said that after diplomatic dickering and bizarre deployments, the Serbs finally were making good on a week-old pledge to vacate the strategic peak dominating Sarajevo. "They are moving in a southeast direction," Cmdr. Barry Frewer of Canada, spokesman for U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia, said with caution acquired through bitter experience. "That would seem to suggest that they are withdrawing from the area."
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher warned Bosnian Serbs on Friday to end their siege of Sarajevo and abide by a framework peace accord that would give Bosnian Muslims a share in any partition of Bosnia or risk the threat of allied air strikes. "The international community simply cannot accept the laying of siege of cities and the continuous bombardment of civilians," Christopher told reporters assembled in a hangar just off the flight line at this eastern Italian NATO base.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and the 15 other Western Alliance leaders Tuesday broadened NATO's threat to intervene in Bosnia-Herzegovina, declaring they are prepared to launch air strikes in two areas--in addition to Sarajevo. The decision effectively extends the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's warning made last August to use air attacks to prevent the fall of the Bosnian capital to include the besieged Muslim enclaves of Srebrenica and Tuzla.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|