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Bosnia Herzegovina Revolts

NEWS
October 28, 1992 | Associated Press
Muslim and Croatian leaders agreed Tuesday to a cease-fire in a town near Sarajevo, but their anti-Serb coalition in the Bosnian war remained shaky. Croatian militiamen overran the Muslim-held town of Prozor after four days of fighting, forcing its 3,000 inhabitants to flee, according to the commander of Muslim-led Bosnian government forces there. But Croatian officials denied taking the town. Both sides met Tuesday and agreed to pull their fighters from the town, sources said.
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NEWS
October 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Four U.S. and Canadian planes carrying food and medicine landed at Sarajevo's shell-scarred airport Sunday, and the U.N. refugee agency said it hopes more loads of urgently needed supplies will arrive today. The airlift to the Serbian-besieged Bosnian capital was halted for the day shortly after noon, because of bad weather rather than the occasional crackle of gun and mortar fire that could be heard from the airport.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday recommended an enlarged peacekeeping force to escort relief convoys in Bosnia-Herzegovina that could grow to as many as 7,500 troops and support staff. He gave no precise numbers in a report to the Security Council, but he said the current 1,500-strong force in Sarajevo could increase as much as five times, which would mean 6,000 more personnel. He did not recommend any air cover.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A palace coup in the Yugoslav capital of Belgrade and violent clashes between police and anti-regime demonstrators herald a dangerous strengthening of Serbian nationalism that could worsen ethnic conflicts throughout the Balkans. Indeed, the political stage is set for a power struggle between Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic and a nationalist rival of his own making that holds the clear potential for a deadly Serb-against-Serb civil war.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees called off a massive relief mission for Bosnia on Wednesday, charging that all factions in the brutal conflict here have "made a mockery" of the humanitarian effort by using aid as a weapon.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turkey will probably refuse to permit the continued use of a Turkish air base for bombing Iraq unless the world community does something to stop the bloodshed in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Turkish President Turgut Ozal said Wednesday. Ozal, a staunch member of the U.S.-assembled Persian Gulf War coalition, said that the failure of the United Nations to stop Serbian aggression against Bosnian Muslims has caused growing anger in Turkey, where the population is overwhelmingly Muslim.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Western governments Thursday called on combatants in the Balkans to surrender their heavy weapons and resume talks on the future of Bosnia-Herzegovina without conditions, effectively commanding them to undo five months of savagery that has killed thousands and made 2 million homeless. The negotiations, to open in Geneva next week, are to be part of a vast new bureaucracy created by the conference delegates to tackle the Yugoslav crisis, one that they conceded was beyond their ability to resolve.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its allies are seriously considering imposing a "no-fly" zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina to neutralize Serbia's air supremacy in the bloody ethnic warfare over the ruins of Yugoslavia, a senior Bush Administration official said Friday. Speaking at a meeting of the Overseas Writers Assn., the official said Washington was conferring with Britain, France and other allies over the enforcement of such a ban, presumably by shooting down any Serbian aircraft that challenged it.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Bosnian Serbs pleaded not guilty to war crimes charges but openly thanked U.S. diplomats and NATO troops to whom they surrendered Saturday. Miroslav Tadic, 61, and Milan Simic, 40, are the first Bosnian Serbs to turn themselves over voluntarily to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. In a brief initial appearance before the U.N.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | From Reuters
The Security Council on Friday barred military flights over Bosnia-Herzegovina, where Serbian forces have the only warplanes, and left open the option of authorizing air combat patrols if the ban is violated. A resolution immediately establishing the "no-fly" zone was adopted by a vote of 14-0, with only China abstaining. The U.N. Protection Force in Yugoslavia was ordered to monitor compliance with the ban by stationing observers where necessary at airfields throughout the former federation.
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