Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBosnia Herzegovina Transportation
IN THE NEWS

Bosnia Herzegovina Transportation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Semsa Cerovic's commute from her village home to her city office should be a breeze. It's just 12 miles each way on a modern highway through scenic mountain terrain. But the 51-year-old land surveyor, who lives in Serb-run Pale and works in Muslim-run Sarajevo, must cross a boundary of ethnic hostility and fear. A legacy of the 1992-95 Bosnian war, the line is invisible but real enough to make the trip an ordeal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Semsa Cerovic's commute from her village home to her city office should be a breeze. It's just 12 miles each way on a modern highway through scenic mountain terrain. But the 51-year-old land surveyor, who lives in Serb-run Pale and works in Muslim-run Sarajevo, must cross a boundary of ethnic hostility and fear. A legacy of the 1992-95 Bosnian war, the line is invisible but real enough to make the trip an ordeal.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | Associated Press
To cheers and applause, 41 civilians crossed the Brotherhood and Unity Bridge linking the Serb- and government-held parts of Sarajevo for the first time in two years of civil war Wednesday. "If this was the Sarajevo 'Wall,' then it is falling apart," said Borislav Cuh, 68, as he crossed to see his two sons on the government-held side for the first time since shooting began. Not all the journeys across the bridge spanning the Miljacka River ended pleasantly.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A passenger train sputtered out of Sarajevo on Tuesday, reopening a key north-south railway and prospects of an economic recovery in Bosnia after 3 1/2 years of war. Bosnian officials and foreign diplomats boarded the five-coach train headed for the Adriatic port of Ploce, Croatia, after a ceremony in which Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic proclaimed: "This, today, is the second opening of the city."
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bosnian Muslim bus driver was blocking the road and nothing could persuade him to move, not a Pakistani MP, a squad of British soldiers, a U.N. convoy or two frustrated American journalists. The driver and his passengers had been trapped all night by the worst snowstorm to hit Bosnia in at least 25 years. By morning, the bus still could not make it up the slippery grade.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A passenger train sputtered out of Sarajevo on Tuesday, reopening a key north-south railway and prospects of an economic recovery in Bosnia after 3 1/2 years of war. Bosnian officials and foreign diplomats boarded the five-coach train headed for the Adriatic port of Ploce, Croatia, after a ceremony in which Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic proclaimed: "This, today, is the second opening of the city."
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bosnian Muslim bus driver was blocking the road and nothing could persuade him to move, not a Pakistani MP, a squad of British soldiers, a U.N. convoy or two frustrated American journalists. The driver and his passengers had been trapped all night by the worst snowstorm to hit Bosnia in at least 25 years. By morning, the bus still could not make it up the slippery grade.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | Associated Press
To cheers and applause, 41 civilians crossed the Brotherhood and Unity Bridge linking the Serb- and government-held parts of Sarajevo for the first time in two years of civil war Wednesday. "If this was the Sarajevo 'Wall,' then it is falling apart," said Borislav Cuh, 68, as he crossed to see his two sons on the government-held side for the first time since shooting began. Not all the journeys across the bridge spanning the Miljacka River ended pleasantly.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|