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December 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Antonio Carlos Jobim, the founding father of Brazil's bossa nova music who composed the world-famous song "The Girl From Ipanema," died Thursday in a New York hospital. He was 67. Jobim died of heart failure at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, where he had been a patient since Monday. His attorney, David Grossberg, said Jobim underwent minor surgery Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
His name is Joao Gilberto. And he is, simultaneously, a man and a myth. Mention bossa nova and it is his name, along with that of Antonio Carlos Jobim, that immediately comes to mind. His pairing with jazz great Stan Getz in the 1964 album "Getz/Gilberto" burst onto the pop music scene, winning seven Grammys, remaining on the charts for more than a year and richly coloring subsequent decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
His name is Joao Gilberto. And he is, simultaneously, a man and a myth. Mention bossa nova and it is his name, along with that of Antonio Carlos Jobim, that immediately comes to mind. His pairing with jazz great Stan Getz in the 1964 album "Getz/Gilberto" burst onto the pop music scene, winning seven Grammys, remaining on the charts for more than a year and richly coloring subsequent decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Dewey Erney had just gotten married in 1962 when he first heard the songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim being performed by guitarist Charlie Byrd in a Washington, D.C., nightclub called the Showboat Lounge. "Byrd had just been to Brazil, and he was playing such songs as 'One Note Samba,' 'O Grande Amor' 'Desafinado,' " Erney said. "Stan Getz was in the club one night, and I overheard him having a conversation about making an album of this music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Dewey Erney had just gotten married in 1962 when he first heard the songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim being performed by guitarist Charlie Byrd in a Washington, D.C., nightclub called the Showboat Lounge. "Byrd had just been to Brazil, and he was playing such songs as 'One Note Samba,' 'O Grande Amor' 'Desafinado,' " Erney said. "Stan Getz was in the club one night, and I overheard him having a conversation about making an album of this music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1995 | Ernest Hardy
* * 1/2 Towa Tei, "Future Listening," Elektra. The first half of this album includes some of the very best pop-dance you'll hear this year, a heady, intriguing smorgasbord of techno, bossa nova, world music and house. On his solo debut, this founding member of Deee-Lite has created grooves that evoke the quirky, kitschy ingenuity of that band's early records. He starts to repeat himself near the end, but not before marking himself as a talent to watch.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL
These are the sessions that established tenor man Getz, fresh out of Woody Herman's "Four Brothers" sax section, as a bandleader in his own right and as a pilot in the then-new, "Cool School" of jazz. Getz's dreamy, cloud-like tone paired with intelligent, deceptively clever improvisations and an ethereal atmosphere--particularly on ballads such as "My Old Flame" and the original composition "Mar-Cia"--hallmarked his early output.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Luis Floriano Bonfa, the noted Brazilian guitarist and composer who played a pivotal role in the broad introduction of bossa nova music, has died. Bonfa died of cancer Friday in Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian news media reported. He was 78. The composer of more than 500 songs in a career spanning four decades, Bonfa was perhaps best known for "Manha De Carnaval" or "Carnival Morning," from the legendary film "Black Orpheus." Born in Rio on Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Joe Harnell, a Grammy Award-winning pianist, arranger and conductor, died Thursday of heart failure at Sherman Oaks Hospital in Sherman Oaks, according to his publicist. He was 80. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., Harnell began studying piano when he was 6 and started his professional career as a jazz pianist at 14. He graduated from the University of Miami with a degree in music. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces during World War II, touring with the Glenn Miller Air Force band.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Keter Betts, a jazz bassist heard on more than 200 recordings, notably with guitarist Charlie Byrd and singers Dinah Washington and Ella Fitzgerald, was found dead Saturday at his home in Silver Spring, Md. He was 77. The cause of death had not been determined, according to a funeral home in Washington, D.C. Betts played in bands with Oscar Peterson, Tommy Flanagan, Woody Herman, Nat Adderley, Joe Pass, Clifford Brown and Vince Guaraldi.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Antonio Carlos Jobim, the founding father of Brazil's bossa nova music who composed the world-famous song "The Girl From Ipanema," died Thursday in a New York hospital. He was 67. Jobim died of heart failure at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, where he had been a patient since Monday. His attorney, David Grossberg, said Jobim underwent minor surgery Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The light, lilting vocals of Michael Franks seem especially suited to the cool, bossa nova-paced music of the late Brazilian composer Antonio Carlos Jobim. Franks' most recent album makes much of this connection as Jobim's spirit permeates the disc. But appearing at the Wilshire Theatre Saturday night, Franks chose to largely ignore Jobim, instead announcing that he would be digging into "ancient history," then offering a retrospective of his 20-plus years of recordings.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | ROBERT BRODY
Right after hearing Mick Jagger sing "Start Me Up," Olympic triple jumper Willie Banks set an indoor world record. Just moments after listening to a Whitney Houston song, he broke the world outdoor record. "It's almost like I'm on a music drug," he said. "The music helps get my movements in a groove. It relaxes me so I can tune out distractions." Eight-time world champion diver Greg Louganis runs, bicycles and lifts weights to music.
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