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October 3, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The end for the 1995 Angels did not come nearly as swift as it did for the 1986 Angels, who were one out away from the World Series before blowing Game 5 and losing to Boston in the American League playoffs. Compared to calamitous 1986, when the typhoon that was Donnie Moore-to-Dave Henderson blew through Anaheim and left complete destruction in its wake, the end of 1995 was more a persistent rainstorm, with dark clouds hovering above the Angels for six weeks.
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SPORTS
July 6, 2013 | Lance Pugmire
A change in fortune. That's been the story of Josh Hamilton's first season as an Angel, and a more specific twist of fate proved cruel again Friday as the Boston Red Sox claimed a 6-2 victory at Angel Stadium. A night after blasting a dramatic, tying ninth-inning home run, Hamilton sprinted at full speed in right field to pursue a high, slicing fly by Boston's Jonny Gomes with two outs in a seventh-inning tie. Hamilton was positioned for the catch, but the ball struck the top of his glove and fell to the grass, the error allowing Shane Victorino to score from first base.
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SPORTS
October 12, 1990 | STEVE BURGARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER: Steve Burgard is editorial page editor of the Orange County edition of The Times.
Those of us who dared to hope that baseball's league playoffs might produce a rematch of the first World Series rivals, Boston and Pittsburgh, were done in by the Oakland Athletics. Ah, well. The record books are one thing, but an oral history is something more personal. Boston fans, such as myself, younger than 80 will not remember 1918, the last time the Red Sox won a World Series.
SPORTS
October 11, 2009 | Kevin Baxter and Mike DiGiovanna
For the Red Sox faithful, the mood here Saturday was as dark and depressing as the heavy clouds hanging over Logan Airport. "Silenced Sox Limp Home," read the front-page headline in the Boston Globe. "Sox in Deep," said the Boston Herald. In the Boston clubhouse, the situation didn't seem so dire. "It's not the end of the world, like somebody said," second baseman Dustin Pedroia said with a grin. That somebody would be Manny Ramirez , who, in his final postseason with the Red Sox, made that proclamation with Boston a loss away from elimination in the 2007 American League Championship Series against Cleveland.
SPORTS
October 13, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Don Zimmer broke into tears as he apologized for charging Pedro Martinez, the most dramatic of developments on another wild day at the American League championship series in which Zimmer and three players were fined a total of $90,000 for improper conduct, executives of the competing teams publicly pointed fingers at each other after a directive to shut up, and Boston police continued an investigation that could result in criminal charges against two New York players.
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Ray Boone's 13-year career in the major leagues, his peak salary was $32,500. If he were in his prime today, he would be earning about a hundred times that much. Under the circumstances, Boone, 68, who attended Hoover High in San Diego and lives in Alpine, Calif., might be tempted to say he was born too soon. His son, Bob, made a more handsome living in 19 major league seasons, and his grandson, Bret, is on the brink of a career that could make him a multimillionaire.
SPORTS
October 29, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
If you're reading this today, they were wrong. The Boston Red Sox won the World Series and the world did not end. The apocalypse, certain to be upon us as soon as the Red Sox tampered with the time continuum and the forces of nature by sweeping the St. Louis Cardinals on Wednesday night for their first World Series championship since 1918, never happened. Boston did not vaporize. Buildings around Fenway Park were not reduced to rubble.
SPORTS
April 27, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent announced Friday that he was rejecting an appeal by Boston Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens and upholding Clemens' five-game suspension and $10,000 fine. Those were Clemens' penalties for shoving an umpire and threatening another after he was ejected from Game 4 of the American League playoffs with the Oakland Athletics last October.
SPORTS
October 11, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Stewart proved to be a man of his word Wednesday, but he doubts Roger Clemens is. The bellwether of the Oakland Athletics' pitching staff will be fishing for sturgeon near the Richmond Bridge today, as he had predicted Tuesday. He put the Boston Red Sox out of their misery Wednesday by pitching a 3-1 victory, his second of the A's four-game sweep in the American League playoff. It earned him the most-valuable-player award.
SPORTS
October 15, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Rick Reed did not get any threatening phone calls at his New York hotel from irate Red Sox fans Thursday. There were no suspicious-looking room-service meals awaiting the American League umpire. "Fortunately," said Reed, who admitted blowing a crucial 10th-inning call that went against Boston in Game 1 Wednesday night, "they don't know where we stay."
SPORTS
October 10, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
Runs have been hard to come by for the Red Sox in the American League division series. Although Boston was third in the majors in scoring during the regular season, it took the Red Sox 13 innings to get on the scoreboard against the Angels. And that one, lonely fourth-inning run Friday is all they've gotten in the series. In fact, through two games the Red Sox have just two extra-base hits and as many strikeouts (13) as baserunners. Kevin Youkilis , second in the American League with a .413 on-base percentage during the summer, has been on base once in this series.
SPORTS
October 10, 2009 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, ON THE ANGELS
Jered Weaver threw 7 1/3 brilliant innings, allowing one run and two hits. A pair of gnats, 5-foot-8, 170-pound Maicer Izturis and 5-10, 170-pound Erick Aybar, came through with humongous hits. The bullpen, a soft spot for much of the season, held firm. This may be hard to fathom for Orange County baseball fans, but when the Angels arrive in Fenway Park this weekend, it will be the Boston Red Sox who have their backs against the Green Monster. The Angels, playoff fodder for the Red Sox for so many years, pushed their October nemeses to the brink of elimination with a 4-1 Game 2 victory in Angel Stadium on Friday night to take a commanding 2-0 lead in the best-of-five American League division series.
SPORTS
October 10, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
A great baseball game builds like a great night at the symphony. The Angels and Red Sox played one Friday night, and in the end, the Angels hit most of the high notes. It seems fairly clear now that the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, who have been off-key so often in recent postseason play, are now producing sweet music. This game started slowly, quietly. Soft percussions. The guys with the batons in their hands, Red Sox pitcher Josh Beckett and Angels pitcher Jered Weaver, controlled everything.
SPORTS
October 10, 2009 | DIANE PUCIN, ON SPORTS MEDIA
Some of the highs and lows of watching Angels-Red Sox Game 2: Say hey Too bad, "Hitch" fans. Half-hour into the TNT movie, and the flick starring Will Smith and Kevin James was dumped for the start of the Angels-Red Sox game, which had to be moved off TBS because of extra Yankees innings. Say what? Erick Aybar is a trusting guy. Analyst Buck Martinez pointed out how Aybar checked with plate umpire CB Bucknor on whether a pitch Aybar swung at and missed would have been over the plate.
SPORTS
October 9, 2009 | BILL SHAIKIN
You could hear it all over the ballpark, in the dugout and in the owner's suite, in the box seats and in the bleachers. It was the sound of a franchise exhaling. First the pause, then the applause. First the hush, then the roar. The ball soared high into the night sky, carrying the hopes and fears of a franchise. Could it possibly travel far enough to extinguish all that bad karma? The ball was going ... going ... gone! The nagging worry about what spell the Boston boys had in mind for the Angels this year was going ... going ... gone!
SPORTS
October 9, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
The overall defensive numbers favor Jeff Mathis , but Manager Mike Scioscia will start catcher Mike Napoli tonight with pitcher Jered Weaver for Game 2 against the Red Sox. Weaver has a 3.38 earned-run average in the 141 1/3 innings he has thrown to Mathis this season; he has a 4.59 ERA in 68 2/3 innings with Napoli. But Napoli caught six of Weaver's last nine starts, and the right-hander had a 2.11 ERA in 38 1/3 innings of those games, including a seven-hit shutout in Cleveland on Aug. 19. "Mike has worked well with Jered recently," Scioscia said.
SPORTS
November 29, 1989 | Associated Press
WRKO radio has selected Bob Starr, play-by-play announcer for the Angels, to succeed Ken Coleman as the Red Sox principal radio broadcaster next season, according to John Carlson, another sports broadcaster at the station. Starr's broadcasting career spans more than 30 years, including 18 years with major league baseball. Starr also did play-by-play announcing of the New England Patriots and Boston College football from 1966 to 1970 on WBZ radio.
SPORTS
October 11, 1990 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Clemens may have said the "magic words" that merited his ejection, but the Oakland Athletics worked the swift and stunning magic that made the Boston Red Sox disappear from the American League playoffs in four games. Counted on by the Red Sox to resuscitate their faint comeback hopes, Clemens pitched only 1 2/3 innings Wednesday before being ejected by plate umpire Terry Cooney. It was a novel incident--only the fifth ejection in postseason history--on a day that had a familiar ending.
SPORTS
October 9, 2009 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Don't bring any talk of a "hex" by Torii Hunter's locker. That was the center fielder's stern message to reporters who dared to broach the topic of the Boston Red Sox's playoff dominance of the Angels in the days leading up to the American League division series. "I told you, I'm a different breed," Hunter barked when asked if the Red Sox were in the Angels' heads. "You might not want to ask me that question." Hunter couldn't have hammered his point home any better Thursday night, driving a prodigious three-run home run to center field to snap a scoreless fifth-inning tie and propel the Angels to a 5-0 victory in Game 1 over their playoff nemesis at Angel Stadium.
SPORTS
October 9, 2009 | DIANE PUCIN
Some of the highs and lows of watching Angels-Red Sox Game 1: Say hey: Welcome to Angels Stadium. The high-definition blimp shot of all the traffic lights? Almost pretty enough to send a person to a car and onto the 5 Freeway. Or maybe not. Say what? Someone needs to change this now. TBS ran an ad for Captain Morgan liquor touting the benefits of the big bottle that offers drinkers 40 shots. Immediately followed by a Fox/TBS ad for its postseason baseball coverage that begins: "Every game the Angels honor their teammate Nick Adenhart."
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