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Botulism

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1995 | ANDREW D. BLECHMAN
Public health officials suspect that tainted Mexican black-tar heroin has led to at least one case of botulism in Ventura County. One county resident is suffering from the neurotoxin and another is showing some of its symptoms, according to Ellen Dewey, a Ventura County public health nurse. Both are being treated in Ventura hospitals. Public health officials urge anyone who suspects they may have botulism to seek medical attention immediately.
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NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A Canadian company is recalling various brands and flavors of canned soup sold in stores across the United States because they might be contaminated with botulism. The soups, sold in 10 3/4-ounce cans and made by Les Produits Freddy Inc. of St. Hyacinthe, Quebec, were distributed to U.S. stores nationwide, though the number of cans affected is not known, the Food and Drug Administration said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scores of wild mallards have been found dead or dying this week along widely separated stretches of the Los Angeles River near Glendale and in Long Beach, apparently victims of an outbreak of botulism aggravated by the drought, wildlife officials said Friday. Los Angeles animal regulation officers picked up about 30 dead ducks Friday on the concrete banks of the river along the Golden State Freeway near Griffith Park.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An experimental new treatment for infant botulism, a life-threatening, paralytic disease, will be available from the state Department of Health Services early this month. The new therapy consists of antibodies that can neutralize the botulism toxin, which causes the disease. The antibodies were obtained from California volunteers who were immunized against the toxin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | JACK SEARLES
Several hundred sea gulls have died of avian botulism poisoning on a beach where Ventura and Oxnard meet, officials reported Thursday. The exact source of the toxin that has killed birds in the past month is not known, said Jeff Price, chief ranger for the Channel Coast District of the state Department of Parks and Recreation. "Our research tells us the bacteria that carries such botulism could come from such sources as animal bodies, fly maggots or even buried corn," Price said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A virulent outbreak of botulism that has killed or sickened 2,500 to 2,800 pelicans at the Salton Sea--including about 1,000 endangered brown pelicans--has begun to spread to other species of birds. Although the die-off among pelicans is slowing, "it is getting worse in the shorebird population," Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge manager Clark Bloom said Monday. "It is affecting everything down here at the sea. . . . I'm sure more birds will die before this is over with."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scores of wild mallards have been found dead or dying this week along widely separated stretches of the Los Angeles River in Glendale and Long Beach, apparently victims of an outbreak of botulism aggravated by the drought, wildlife officials said Friday. Los Angeles animal regulation officers picked up about 30 dead ducks Friday on the concrete banks of the river along the Golden State Freeway near Griffith Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State agriculture officials Wednesday blamed hay cubes contaminated with a botulism bacteria for the mystifying deaths of at least 15 horses in stables across Southern California over the past two weeks.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
The government on Friday approved a type of food poisoning bacteria for use as a treatment for crossed eyes and another eye disorder that renders its victims legally blind. The Food and Drug Administration said a sterile, purified botulism toxin was approved as an injection therapy to treat strabismus, or cross-eye, and blepharospasm, a muscle disorder that makes the eyes close involuntarily.
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