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Botulism

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000
Several birds found dead on Lake Lindero last week probably died from avian botulism, said Larry Sitton, a senior biologist with the California Department of Fish and Game. The disease generally strikes as water temperatures rise, he said, adding that it does not affect humans. Area residents voiced concerns after they said eight dead ducks and a dead sea gull were found last week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're trucked in by the dozen every day: limp, listless bundles of feathers--endangered brown pelicans sickened by the annual botulism outbreak at the Salton Sea. Already, 112 sick birds have arrived at the Pacific Wildlife Project in Irvine, where volunteers under veterinary supervision painstakingly nurse the pelicans back to health with the goal of releasing them to the wild. Some birds have fallen ill every year since 1996--when about 1,500 pelicans perished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | ANDREW GLAZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aiona Fernandez and her wide-eyed, stroller-bound son, Benjamin, were greeted by squawks from mud hens, white geese and green-necked mallards that dived greedily after bits of stale bread the pair tossed into the lake at Laguna Niguel Regional Park on Wednesday morning. Little did they know, those scraps may be deadly. Bread fed by humans is thought to have caused the botulism deaths of more than 20 male mallards at the lake since late October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have been arriving here literally by the truckload since Saturday: brown pelicans, each in various stages of distress, stricken by deadly botulism. They are quickly assessed and assigned to care wards according to need. The most acute cases are placed in a separate room. There they languish, heads propped up by pillows and long curved necks bent grotesquely.
NEWS
June 5, 1999 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She has a husband, a public relations business, scrupulous eating habits, and--as she puts it--"a really good body for 33." In what has so far been a full and chaotic life, she has survived a broken marriage and made a happy new one; she has conquered a drug habit that bedeviled her in her 20s and sworn off alcohol. But nothing continues to betray her like the vertical lines that have etched their way between her brows and into her psyche. She can live with not looking like a model.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Injection drug users in California are suffering a "dramatic increase" in wound botulism, a serious, often fatal infection caused by spores from a common soil bacterium, researchers reported this week. Also being seen among the same population are smaller, but still noticeable, increases in tetanus and necrotizing fasciitis, the latter caused by the so-called flesh-eating bacteria.
NEWS
January 29, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers are under heavy pressure from the Pentagon to complete work on an experimental vaccine to protect soldiers against deadly botulism, an organism believed to be part of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's biological weapons arsenal, the scientists said Wednesday. Researchers at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, in collaboration with scientists at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Frederick, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1997
Ten horses have been euthanized and their stable closed after the animals were sickened by hay that may have been contaminated with botulism spores, animal control officials said. Bob Caron, owner of the Sunset Stables in South El Monte, closed the facility before five horses were put down Monday. The other horses were euthanized late last week. Veterinarians suspect that the horses were sick from botulism, an ailment that is fatal in horses about 90% of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it looks like a stable, this dimly lit, block-walled space with its concrete floors and long rows of barred doors. But behind each door sit brown pelicans, two or three to a stall, hundreds in all, with gleaming eyes, sculpted bills, curvaceous necks, feathers slick from their morning shower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a feathery grace that belied their narrow escape from death, 16 California brown pelicans stricken with botulism but then nursed back to health in Laguna Niguel were released Thursday into the federal wildlife refuge here. "I feel like a father sending his daughter out on her first date," said Richard Evans, the Orange County veterinarian and medical director of the nonprofit Pacific Wildlife Project in Laguna Niguel. "We've done everything we could to teach them the right thing to do.
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