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Bounty Hunter

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Chloe Sony, $27.96; Blu-ray, $34.95 The erotic thriller "Chloe" (based on Anne Fontaine's French film "Nathalie") is a decided change of pace for the usually chilly Canadian writer-director Atom Egoyan. It's gloriously, deliriously overheated, like Hitchcock by way of De Palma. Julianne Moore plays a fussy gynecologist who suspects that her husband (Liam Neeson) is cheating on her, so she hires a prostitute (Amanda Seyfried to tempt him. From there, a series of misunderstandings leads to crazy plot twists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The frantic action-comedy "Chinese Zodiac" may please non-discriminating fans of its co-writer/director/star (and more) Jackie Chan, but will likely leave most other viewers dazed, confused and eagerly watching the clock. The fact that this awkwardly dubbed, stateside version reportedly runs about 15 minutes shorter than the cut released in China may in part account for the movie's convoluted plotting. On the upside, there's now less of this cartoonish mishmash to wade through. Blasting, brawling and close-calling his way through the mayhem is Chan, cheesing it up as a bounty hunter known only as J.C. (which one, er, prays stands for "Jackie Chan")
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
"The Bounty Hunter," the new action caper starring Jennifer Aniston and Gerard Butler as dueling exes, plays to everything that turned one of the "Friends" six-pack into a lip-gloss superstar. First to be exploited is Aniston's perk power. When that fails, the second line of defense is a close-up of that really great hair, which doesn't so much make for a movie as a running photo op. Somehow Aniston is better at looking sexy than acting sexy. And though there were many reports of just how hot a couple she and Butler were off screen during filming, none of that translated after director Andy Tennant yelled "action."
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The star of this reality show is a Mexican immigrant who carries pink handcuffs. The bounty hunter show "Fugitivos de la Ley: Los Angeles" boasts a cast that includes two real-life federal agents and a fireplug of a man, a former U.S. Marine from Riverside. There's also a 29-year-old firefighter who grew up in Pacoima and is nicknamed "Bombero" - Spanish for fireman - and a German shepherd named Cooper. "Fugitivos" is an attempt by the small bilingual cable channel Mun2 to boost its profile by tapping into the richness of L.A.'s Latino population to find compelling characters and stories.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The star of this reality show is a Mexican immigrant who carries pink handcuffs. The bounty hunter show "Fugitivos de la Ley: Los Angeles" boasts a cast that includes two real-life federal agents and a fireplug of a man, a former U.S. Marine from Riverside. There's also a 29-year-old firefighter who grew up in Pacoima and is nicknamed "Bombero" - Spanish for fireman - and a German shepherd named Cooper. "Fugitivos" is an attempt by the small bilingual cable channel Mun2 to boost its profile by tapping into the richness of L.A.'s Latino population to find compelling characters and stories.
WORLD
August 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A Mexican judge has ruled that the statute of limitations has expired on a criminal case against bounty hunter Duane "Dog" Chapman, but state prosecutors appealed, officials said. Prosecutors will continue seeking Chapman's extradition despite the July 27 ruling, said a Jalisco official. Chapman was arrested in September by U.S. authorities on a Mexican warrant over his 2003 capture in Puerto Vallarta of fugitive convicted rapist and Max Factor heir Andrew Luster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001
California's initiative petition system is increasingly out of control. One reason is that the people who collect petition signatures can make as much as $5 for every John Hancock they gather. The initiative system, designed to allow citizens to write their own laws, is riddled with problems. It is, for instance, far too easy for a wealthy special interest to write a law that is good for the special interest and lousy for the public.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who murdered a couple after posing as a bounty hunter was sentenced in a Phoenix court to life in prison without the possibility of parole. David Brackney, 47, was one of five masked men who claimed to be in search of a California bail jumper when they burst into the couple's home in August 1997, according to prosecutors. Christopher Foote, 25, shot at the men as they tried to break down his bedroom door.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Television reality show star Duane "Dog" Chapman and two co-stars were arrested Thursday on charges of illegal detention and conspiracy in connection with their capture of a fugitive in Mexico in 2003. Chapman, his brother Timothy and son Leland did not resist arrest, said Mark Hanohano, U.S. marshal for the district of Hawaii. Mona K. Wood, a publicist for the star of the cable series "Dog The Bounty Hunter," said Chapman would be vindicated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2005 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Domino Harvey, the daughter of British privilege whose life as a bounty hunter in South Los Angeles is the basis of an upcoming big-budget movie, died of an accidental overdose of a powerful painkiller, a coroner's report released Friday said. The Los Angeles County coroner's office found that Harvey had a level of fentanyl, a drug more powerful than morphine, in her heart, blood and liver "typically seen in fatal overdoses." Her death was due to "acute fentanyl toxicity," the report said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By T.L. Stanley
Anyone who's ever laid eyes on Beth Chapman, the costar of former hit reality show "Dog the Bounty Hunter," might think she's one of a kind, with her lacquered nails, stiletto heels and pink handcuffs. It turns out she has imitators, and she's none too pleased with her flashy doppelgangers. She and her husband, Duane "Dog" Chapman, found several impractically outfitted bounty hunters while playing mentor to mom-and-pop bail bond agencies across the country for an upcoming series on CMT. “I asked them to change their clothes and put on sensible shoes,” Beth Chapman said recently by phone during a break in filming in Oklahoma City.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
“Django Unchained” star Christoph Waltz may have starred in a movie that's kicking up dust for its portrayal of the slavery era, but the Golden Globes supporting actor winner said that he's remained unfazed by the backlash. “It should be controversial,”  the man who plays a smooth-talking bounty hunter said backstage. “If you choose a controversial subject, you better be prepared for a controversial discussion,” he said, adding, “I wish more movies gave us an opportunity to discuss controversial [subjects]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The “Django Unchained” trailer that hit the Web last week highlights a number of the movie's unusual aspects, not least of which is the blending of Tarantino-esque revenge western with one of the most shameful chapters of American history. But star Jamie Foxx said the shamefulness will come through loud and clear. “This is the truest depiction of slavery [on screen], in terms of how tough and brutal it was,” the actor told 24 Frames. “When you see the movie you'll automatically go back to the time and the way slaves were treated.” PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments He added, “It's really going to make people look at the time in a different way.” Foxx plays the titular Django, a fugitive slave who joins up with a bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz)
SPORTS
October 9, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
There they were Sunday night, during the televised NFL game, their pictures flashed to a nation of TV viewers, with penalties incurred listed below. They were three known New Orleans Saints evildoers. They might just as well have been on the wall of a post office: --Sean Payton, Saints head coach, suspended for the season. --Joe Vitt, Saints assistant coach, suspended for six games. --Gregg Williams, Saints defensive coordinator, suspended indefinitely. They were the core of the New Orleans bounty hunters, the men who un-Saintly created or allowed their players to pool money and award it to those who knocked key opponents out of games.
SPORTS
June 18, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
Even as they decried the NFL's process as unfair and "a sham," the four players suspended for their role in the New Orleans Saints' alleged bounty scandal appealed their punishments Monday to Commissioner Roger Goodell at league headquarters in New York. Linebacker Jonathan Vilma, whose season-long suspension was the harshest penalty, left the appeals hearing after an hour. Vilma's lawyer, Peter Ginsberg, said the NFL had requested an adjournment to the afternoon, but the lawyer and his client opted to leave, pulling out of the process entirely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
One by one, the young women vanished from the dusty farm towns of the Central Valley. They were often addicts or prostitutes, and their disappearances over a 15-year period in the 1980s and '90s didn't seem to draw much official concern. Two childhood friends and locally renowned troublemakers, Wesley Shermantine and Loren Herzog, were eventually arrested in 1999 for a series of murders known as the "Speed Freak" killings, and many of the missing were presumed to have fallen victim to the methamphetamine-addled duo. Shermantine and Herzog never disclosed where they dumped the mutilated corpses of their victims, leaving bereaved families with only grim speculation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2003 | Steve Harvey
Mystery novelist John Morgan Wilson believes it's no coincidence that no sooner had bounty hunter Duane Lee "Dog" Chapman won his freedom from Mexico than the U.S. government announced a $25-million reward for the capture of Saddam Hussein. Dog! Fetch! To live and drive: "Making a left turn in L.A. is one of the harder things you'll learn in life," a character says in the 1991 movie "Grand Canyon." But what about in Vancouver, B.C.?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2012 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A mercenary pall hangs over the criminally uninspired "One for the Money. " Tough economic times force Stephanie Plum, the main character, to take a potentially lucrative assignment as a bounty hunter. Fair enough. Except that the filmmakers have left the creative spark out of the equation. The Katherine Heigl vehicle is an ungainly mix of flat-footed gumshoeing and strained attempts at hilarity, all delivered with an unconvincing Joizy vibe. As in most Hollywood romantic comedies of recent vintage, the romance and laughs in "Money" are, respectively, wan and nonexistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Monday. Nicolas Cage got himself arrested in New Orleans over the weekend. Luckily for him, Dog the Bounty Hunter was there to bail him out. ( Los Angeles Times ) With a full lineup of 21st century bands, Coachella was no nostalgia fest this year. ( Los Angeles Times ) The TV Land Awards, however, were a total nostalgia fest. ( Los Angeles Times ) After seven straight weeks of depressed box office, movie grosses appear back on track.
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