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Box Cutters

WORLD
May 21, 2006 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
South Korean opposition leader Park Geun-hye, perhaps the most prominent woman in the country, was slashed in the face Saturday night at a crowded rally for a Seoul mayoral candidate. Police arrested two men, one who had a box cutter; both were said to be intoxicated. The 54-year-old Park underwent emergency surgery to close a 4-inch-long wound running from her ear to her jawline. She was reported to be in good condition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
A man suspected of robbing an Anaheim bank slashed his throat with a box cutter Monday afternoon after being stopped by police in Irvine, authorities said. Police received a call about a man in his 20s robbing the Washington Mutual branch at 555 N. Euclid St. at 12:36 p.m., said Anaheim police Sgt. Rick Martinez. As officers responded, the man left the bank in a white beat-up sports car that was missing a front bumper.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Michael A. Hiltzik, David Willman, Alan C. Miller, Eric Malnic, Peter Pae, Ralph Frammolino and Russell Carollo
As 19 hijackers made their way along the concourses at three East Coast airports on Sept. 11, bent on executing the deadliest terrorist attack in history, they were subjecting the U.S. aviation security system to its most critical test. At almost every step along the way, the system posed no challenge to the terrorists--not to their ability to purchase tickets, to pass security checkpoints while carrying knives and cutting implements nor to board aircraft.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Under pressure from lawmakers and flight attendants, the Transportation Security Administration said it would indefinitely prohibit passengers from carrying small pocket knives on planes - a ban that began after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The decision is a dramatic reversal for TSA chief John Pistole. Two months ago he decided to lift the ban, saying the move would enable airport security officers to focus on bigger threats, such as explosives. Just days before the TSA planned to lift the ban April 25, Pistole said he was temporarily putting off the policy change to consider the comments and concerns of a security panel made up of pilots, flight attendants and other airline workers.
OPINION
July 2, 2006 | Daniel Gilbert, Daniel Gilbert is a professor of psychology at Harvard University and the author of "Stumbling on Happiness," published in May by Knopf.
NO ONE seems to care about the upcoming attack on the World Trade Center site. Why? Because it won't involve villains with box cutters. Instead, it will involve melting ice sheets that swell the oceans and turn that particular block of lower Manhattan into an aquarium. The odds of this happening in the next few decades are better than the odds that a disgruntled Saudi will sneak onto an airplane and detonate a shoe bomb.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | Times Wire Services
Two men arrested with box cutters on an Amtrak train a day after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks pleaded not guilty before federal judges in New York to credit card fraud charges Wednesday. Syed Gul Mohammed Shah, 36, and Mohammed Azmath, 38, were indicted Tuesday. The men left Newark, N.J., for San Antonio by plane on Sept. 11 but were stranded in St. Louis when their flight was grounded.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Here are some significant events and policies in the history of U.S. aviation security: 1955 A United Airlines plane explodes after takeoff in Denver, killing all 44 aboard. Investigators blame Jack Graham for placing a bomb in his mother's luggage, apparently in hopes of cashing in on her life insurance. It is among the first major acts of criminal violence against a U.S. airliner. Graham is later convicted of murder and executed. 1960 A National Airlines plane explodes in midair, killing all 34 aboard.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal charges were filed against a Bulgarian student who allegedly tried to pass through airport security in Atlantic City with a pair of scissors and two box cutters, the FBI said. The man apparently had no ties to terrorism, a U.S. official said. Nikolay Volodiev Dzhonev, 21, was charged with attempting to board an aircraft with a concealed weapon, a felony, the FBI said. He was being held on $100,000 bail, but the FBI said he would probably be released on his own recognizance.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A college student accused of hiding box cutters aboard airliners to expose security weaknesses pleaded guilty in Baltimore, and as part of a plea bargain made a video that could be used to train federal airport screeners. Nathaniel Heatwole could get as much as six months in jail and $5,000 fine at sentencing June 24. The 20-year-old student at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C.
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