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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John Cox first visited the internment camp where about 10,000 Japanese-Americans were forcibly relocated during World War II, he was shocked--not by what he saw, but by what he didn't see. "There was nothing," the 16-year-old Northridge Boy Scout said of his trip last year. "There was just these two guard shacks and a few walls still standing. There's really nothing but a memorial plaque to tell you what really happened here."
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A Boy Scout troop in Seattle that was chartered in November lost its affiliation with the national organization last week after refusing to remove a scout leader who is gay, Boy Scouts of America said. Geoffrey McGrath first announced his sexual orientation in 1988. But last month, his personal life caught the Boy Scouts' attention. McGrath had answered a news reporter's question about his sexual orientation during an interview about his troop, and the reporter in turn checked in with Boy Scouts officials.
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OPINION
April 23, 2013
Re "Scout officials endorse dual tack on gays," April 20 Aside from being annoying and insulting, the recommendation of top Boy Scouts of America officials to allow gay boys to become members while continuing to bar gay men from being leaders is completely illogical. The basic mission of the Boy Scouts is to help young boys become upstanding adult men. By extension, that means helping self-identified gay male youths, likely now to be among the Boy Scouts' ranks, to become upstanding gay adult men. How can that possibly occur when those gay youths see that precisely who they are supposed to become are personae non gratae once they are adults?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
John Claerhout, a former Boy Scouts of America executive known for his finesse at fundraising and his promotion of scouting programs for thousands of inner-city Los Angeles teenagers, has died in a Northridge hospital. He was 85. Claerhout underwent quadruple bypass surgery two weeks before his April 4 death from complications of pneumonia, said his son Kevyn Claerhout. Claerhout was a masterful networker who recruited a stream of local and national celebrities for gala dinners benefiting the Scouts.
OPINION
February 12, 2013
Re "Scout board delays action on gays," Feb. 7 Scouting originated in Britain, where the Scouts organization welcomes gays. Canada's Scouting organization and most in Europe do likewise. At the California Supreme Court, the Boy Scouts successfully argued that it is a religious organization. It later denied that it is a religious organization that would be required by California law to pay full commercial rent for use of government facilities. At the U.S. Supreme Court, the Boy Scouts argued that it is a private organization allowed to set standards for own members.
OPINION
January 3, 2013
Re "Top execs didn't report suspected Scout abuse," Dec. 31 On Monday and Christmas Day (among others), The Times published front-page articles about the Boy Scouts of America's sexual abuse reporting practices relative to its Ineligible Volunteer Files. I'm an Eagle Scout and have been a scouting volunteer for more than 45 years, and I've never witnessed a case of sexual abuse in the organization. However, I do not condone the past practices of the Boy Scouts. Those policies have changed with required criminal background checks of volunteers.
OPINION
July 19, 2012
The Boy Scouts of America, an organization once known mainly for welcoming boys to a world of adventure, self-sufficiency and good citizenship, now is more famous for the groups of people it bans: atheists, agnostics and homosexuals. It's been a sad evolution and an unnecessary one. The Girl Scouts, as well as international Scouting organizations, have carried out their similar missions without resorting to intolerance. By refusing once again this week to admit gay people to its ranks, either as Scouts or leaders, the Boy Scouts may have satisfied some of the religious organizations that sponsor many of its troops, but it risks long-term irrelevance.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Carla Hall
Over the course of two decades, the Boy Scouts of America covered up the acts of hundreds of child molesters within its ranks, never notifying authorities and instead quietly banishing offenders, according to an investigation by the Los Angeles. Sometimes, the molesters left one Scout troop and reappeared at another to molest again, according to information in the 1,600 confidential Boy Scout files that go from 1970 to 1991. That pattern sounds horribly familiar. As with the sexual-abuse cases that rocked the Roman Catholic Church and the Jerry Sandusky case at Penn State, here is another situation in which authorities, entrusted to care for young people, failed to deal properly with molesters in their institution, which led to more children and youths being victimized.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
IRVING, Texas -- The Boy Scouts of America decided Wednesday to put off a decision on whether to lift a national ban of gay members and leaders, saying the issue of sexual orientation was too complex and needed more time for study. The decision to wait came after the organization recently announced that it would consider changing its policies and might allow local chapters to decide whether to admit gays as Scouts and leaders. “After careful consideration and extensive dialog within the Scouting family, along with comments from those outside the organization, the volunteer officers of the Boy Scouts of America's National Executive Board concluded that due to the complexity of this issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its membership policy,” Deron Smith, the BSA director of public relations, said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1998
The Boy Scouts of America may have won their lawsuit but they don't get it. It's about inclusion! RICHARD G. WONG Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- There's no shortage of offbeat characters in San Francisco who are drawn to City Hall. Willie Brown was harassed by an Elvis impersonator. Gavin Newsom was stalked by a man wearing purple latex gloves. Democratic strategist Nathan Ballard, who spent a decade working in City Hall, said Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow was one of those characters. “I just remember him showing up at events and trying to get pictures with politicians,” Ballard said. The Chinatown gangster was trying to make a name for himself as a legitimate community leader after being released from prison in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The national commissioner for the Boy Scouts of America said the decision by Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. to cut funding for the organization over its ban on adult leaders who are gay was disappointing, but not a surprise. Tico Perez told the Orlando Sentinel that  Disney was "very forthright that this was coming down the pike," and that the Boy Scouts hoped to work with the media giant in the future "where our interests align. " Disney's decision  was made public  after the president of a Boy Scouts council in  Apopka , Fla., sent local troops a memo on the move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Walt Disney Co. said it will stop financial support for Boy Scouts-related organizations beginning next year because of the Scouts' policy banning adult leaders who are gay. The Boy Scouts said it is "disappointed" with the move. The company's decision was made public after the president of a Boy Scouts council in Apopka, Fla., sent local troops a memo on Disney's move. Robert Utsey's letter was posted on a website for Scouts for Equality, an organization advocating against the ban on gay leaders, according to the Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Starting in 2015 the Boy Scouts of America's policy banning adult leaders who are gay will cost the organization donations from the Walt Disney Co. Though Disney doesn't provide money to the Boy Scouts' national or local councils, the Burbank-based company with major theme parks in Anaheim and Orlando, Fla., provides small grants to local troops and packs, said Deron Smith, a Boy Scouts spokesman. “We believe every child deserves the opportunity to be a part of the Scouting experience and we are disappointed in this decision because it will impact our ability to serve kids,” Smith said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Requiring public school students to wear polo shirts emblazoned with such messages as “Tomorrow's Leaders” potentially infringes on their rights to free speech, a unanimous federal appeals court decided Friday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a district judge's dismissal of a lawsuit by parents of two elementary school children whose uniform contained the leadership message. The court said the uniform policy must be justified under a stringent legal test that is difficult to meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A public elementary school decided in 2011 to require students to wear a uniform with the school's motto, "Tomorrow's Leaders," emblazoned in small letters on the shirts around a gopher, the campus mascot. One parent objected to the uniforms and eventually sued, contending they violated the 1st Amendment's guarantee of free speech. In a unanimous ruling Friday, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit largely agreed with her. The panel said the words "Tomorrow's Leaders" potentially violated students' right to free speech and the uniform policy must go unless the school district can justify it under a legal standard that is difficult to meet.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated in the notes below.
A Maryland teenager is the first openly gay Boy Scout to become an Eagle Scout, the organization's highest rank, according to the advocacy group Scouts for Equality . High school senior Pascal Tessier is already awaiting the next challenge, which will come this summer when he turns 18. Until recently, gays had been barred from the Scouts. After years of debate, the organization eliminated the ban for minors effective Jan. 1, but kept the restriction against adult Scouting leaders.
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