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Boyd Coddington

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BUSINESS
July 21, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed hot rod builder Boyd Coddington would reclaim the publicly traded company he lost in a bankruptcy earlier this year under a reorganization plan filed Monday for Stanton-based Boyds Wheels Inc. The plan, which still must be approved by creditors, calls for Coddington to return to the custom wheel and hot rod design company he founded.
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BUSINESS
October 31, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
LAS VEGAS - The 1931 Ford Roadster was familiar to Duane Mayer. He originally oversaw the construction of the brilliant red pickup truck in 2006 back when he was project manager for legendary Southern California hot rod designer Boyd Coddington.    But in the years that have passed, Coddington died and the Ford fell in disrepair. It was an emotional event when the truck's owners came to Mayer and asked him to refurbish it. Photos: Highlights from the 2012 SEMA Show “There's a lot of memories tied up in Boyd's cars,” Mayer said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Boyd Coddington still remembers his first car. It was a truck, actually, and he traded a shotgun for it. "I was 13 years old. In Idaho, you could drive when you were 14. I had traded without asking my father, so my dad made me take the truck back and get the shotgun back. Later on, I was able to come up with some money and get the truck back."
NEWS
March 7, 2008
Coddington obituary: The obituary of hot rod and custom car designer and builder Boyd Coddington in the California section Feb. 29 reported that he had won the America's Most Beautiful Roadster Award seven times, including six in a row. Only the vehicle owner's name goes on the perpetual trophy, although it is standard in the industry to say that the builder of the car also won the award. Coddington built six cars that won the award, including one in 1996 that he owned. He built back-to-back winners in 1995 and 1996.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boyd Coddington, whose sleek hot rods and specialty wheels won him legions of fans, has filed for personal bankruptcy in federal court, listing only $8,800 in assets to pay off $529,000 in debts. Coddington had no choice but to seek bankruptcy protection, said his attorney, Keith Dolnick, because creditors were turning to him to pay debts incurred by his two previous businesses, Boyds Wheels and Hot Rods by Boyd, both of which went bankrupt three years ago.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath a blazing sun, Boyd Coddington returned to the Street Ride Nationals in Louisville, Ky., to begin reclaiming his legacy. The bearded, burly 55-year-old unfolded a simple card table, laid out about a dozen aluminum car wheels and hoped the crowds would materialize as they once did. An old acquaintance approached Coddington, who was decked out in his trademark Hawaiian shirt, jeans and shades. Aren't you embarrassed? the man asked. How can you go on? Coddington considered the questions.
NEWS
March 7, 2008
Coddington obituary: The obituary of hot rod and custom car designer and builder Boyd Coddington in the California section Feb. 29 reported that he had won the America's Most Beautiful Roadster Award seven times, including six in a row. Only the vehicle owner's name goes on the perpetual trophy, although it is standard in the industry to say that the builder of the car also won the award. Coddington built six cars that won the award, including one in 1996 that he owned. He built back-to-back winners in 1995 and 1996.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1997 | John O'Dell
Financially ailing Boyds Wheels Inc. said that company founder Boyd Coddington has resigned as chairman and chief executive. The renowned hot-rod designer and builder will remain a member of the Stanton-based company's board of directors and serve as a design and marketing consultant under a long-term agreement. Gardiner S. Dutton, a recent addition to the Boyds Wheels board and a long-time manufacturing industry executive, has been appointed interim chairman and chief executive.
NEWS
January 19, 2000
The Barrett-Jackson Classic Car Auction & Exposition has become a top draw for fans of classic, vintage and collector automobiles. Public viewing at the show, now in its 29th year, runs Thursday through Sunday at WestWorld in Scottsdale, Ariz. The 1999 edition netted $22 million for 571 cars. The 2000 event will feature more than 800 vehicles.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
Stanton hot-rod builder and automotive equipment entrepreneur Boyd Coddington has become the youngest member of the industry's Specialty Equipment Market Assn. Hall of Fame. Coddington, the 50-year-old owner of Coddington Cos., got started in Idaho as a fan of the roadster that comb-wielding carhop "Kookie" tooled around in on the TV series "77 Sunset Strip" in the late 1950s and early '60s. From ages 13 to 21, Coddington built more than 100 hot rods.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boyd Coddington, whose sleek hot rods and specialty wheels won him legions of fans, has filed for personal bankruptcy in federal court, listing only $8,800 in assets to pay off $529,000 in debts. Coddington had no choice but to seek bankruptcy protection, said his attorney, Keith Dolnick, because creditors were turning to him to pay debts incurred by his two previous businesses, Boyds Wheels and Hot Rods by Boyd, both of which went bankrupt three years ago.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath a blazing sun, Boyd Coddington returned to the Street Ride Nationals in Louisville, Ky., to begin reclaiming his legacy. The bearded, burly 55-year-old unfolded a simple card table, laid out about a dozen aluminum car wheels and hoped the crowds would materialize as they once did. An old acquaintance approached Coddington, who was decked out in his trademark Hawaiian shirt, jeans and shades. Aren't you embarrassed? the man asked. How can you go on? Coddington considered the questions.
NEWS
January 19, 2000
The Barrett-Jackson Classic Car Auction & Exposition has become a top draw for fans of classic, vintage and collector automobiles. Public viewing at the show, now in its 29th year, runs Thursday through Sunday at WestWorld in Scottsdale, Ariz. The 1999 edition netted $22 million for 571 cars. The 2000 event will feature more than 800 vehicles.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creditors of bankrupt custom wheel maker Boyds Wheels Inc. filed a reorganization plan Tuesday that would block famed hot-rod builder Boyd Coddington from regaining control of the Stanton-based company. The new plan would put a resurrected Boyds Wheels under the control of an auto racing and performance parts company run by Andrew Evans, a close friend of and longtime financial advisor to software billionaire Bill Gates.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed hot rod builder Boyd Coddington would reclaim the publicly traded company he lost in a bankruptcy earlier this year under a reorganization plan filed Monday for Stanton-based Boyds Wheels Inc. The plan, which still must be approved by creditors, calls for Coddington to return to the custom wheel and hot rod design company he founded.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Financially troubled Boyds Wheels Inc., overextended and pressed by falling sales, filed a bankruptcy petition Friday to seek protection from creditors while it continues to reorganize its operations and debts. The Stanton custom auto parts maker still has $12 million more in equipment and other assets than it has in debts, according to the petition. But that cushion was eroding as shrinking revenue made it difficult for the company to meet its obligations.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Financially troubled Boyds Wheels Inc., overextended and pressed by falling sales, filed a bankruptcy petition Friday to seek protection from creditors while it continues to reorganize its operations and debts. The Stanton custom auto parts maker still has $12 million more in equipment and other assets than it has in debts, according to the petition. But that cushion was eroding as shrinking revenue made it difficult for the company to meet its obligations.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creditors of bankrupt custom wheel maker Boyds Wheels Inc. filed a reorganization plan Tuesday that would block famed hot-rod builder Boyd Coddington from regaining control of the Stanton-based company. The new plan would put a resurrected Boyds Wheels under the control of an auto racing and performance parts company run by Andrew Evans, a close friend of and longtime financial advisor to software billionaire Bill Gates.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1997 | John O'Dell
Financially ailing Boyds Wheels Inc. said that company founder Boyd Coddington has resigned as chairman and chief executive. The renowned hot-rod designer and builder will remain a member of the Stanton-based company's board of directors and serve as a design and marketing consultant under a long-term agreement. Gardiner S. Dutton, a recent addition to the Boyds Wheels board and a long-time manufacturing industry executive, has been appointed interim chairman and chief executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Boyd Coddington still remembers his first car. It was a truck, actually, and he traded a shotgun for it. "I was 13 years old. In Idaho, you could drive when you were 14. I had traded without asking my father, so my dad made me take the truck back and get the shotgun back. Later on, I was able to come up with some money and get the truck back."
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