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Boyd Jefferies

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NEWS
March 20, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In a case indicating that the government's probe of Wall Street practices has significantly broadened, Boyd L. Jefferies, chairman and founder of the Los Angeles brokerage Jefferies & Co., resigned from the firm Thursday and said he will plead guilty to two federal felony counts. One of the charges is related to illegal stock trades he executed with stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boyd L. Jefferies, the controversial founder of the Los Angeles brokerage firm Jefferies & Co., died Thursday near his home in Aspen, Colo., apparently of a heart attack, a spokesman for the company said. He was 70. Jefferies was one of the nation's most powerful traders of big blocks of stock and was a pivotal figure in the corporate raids of the early 1980s.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1989 | From Reuters
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall issued an order Sunday night temporarily halting the second trial of the GAF Corp. pending further proceedings, the company said. Marshall issued the stay to allow defense attorneys for GAF to prepare arguments that the second trial amounted to double jeopardy, which is forbidden by the Constitution. Marshall gave government prosecutors until 11 a.m. EST Wednesday to respond. On Jan.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Boyd L. Jefferies can't stand the possibility of having time on his hands. The founder and former chairman of the Los Angeles-based brokerage Jefferies & Co. used to plant himself at the firm's trading desk at 2:30 a.m. and work straight through until 6 p.m. Now, banned from the firm and the securities industry, and living part of the year in this relaxed resort community high in the Rockies, Jefferies still compulsively gets out of bed at 2 a.m.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Boyd L. Jefferies, the chairman and founder of the Los Angeles brokerage Jefferies & Co., resigned from the firm today and said he will plead guilty to two federal felonies, one of which is related to illegal stock transactions he executed with stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky. Jefferies, 56, also consented to a Securities and Exchange Commission action barring him from the securities industry for at least five years.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1987 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Boyd L. Jefferies is providing information to federal authorities in their continuing investigation of insider trading and other abuses in the high-stakes world of corporate takeovers. In a telephone interview with The Times last week, the former Los Angeles securities trader acknowledged that he is cooperating as part of his plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office in New York.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
1986 Nov. 14: Stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky agrees to pay $100 million to settle charges of trading on insider information. He also agrees to cooperate with investigators and to plead guilty to a single, unspecified criminal charge. 1987 March 19: Boyd L. Jefferies, founder of the Los Angeles securities firm Jefferies & Co., agrees to plead guilty to two criminal charges involving securities law violations, including one deal involving Boesky. He is not accused of insider trading.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Boyd Jefferies, who has admitted breaking the law with Wall Street's once-powerful stock speculator Ivan Boesky, has told a federal judge he believed that he was "bending the rules" at the time. "I am certainly disgraced by my actions in 1984, 1985 and 1986," Jefferies told Judge Morris Lasker, according to a transcript of a pre-sentence hearing made available Friday. "I knew at the time I was bending the rules," Jefferies said in the hearing Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Former brokerage executive Boyd Jefferies said Wednesday that he illegally accumulated stock for corporate raider Paul Bilzerian, who wanted to conceal his stakes in various takeover targets. Jefferies, looking tanned and fit, testified at the trial of the 38-year-old Singer Co. chairman, who is charged with 11 counts of securities and tax fraud, conspiracy and making false statements to the government. If convicted, Bilzerian, a Tampa, Fla., investor, faces a maximum sentence of 55 years in prison and nearly $2.8 million in fines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boyd L. Jefferies, the controversial founder of the Los Angeles brokerage firm Jefferies & Co., died Thursday near his home in Aspen, Colo., apparently of a heart attack, a spokesman for the company said. He was 70. Jefferies was one of the nation's most powerful traders of big blocks of stock and was a pivotal figure in the corporate raids of the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
1986 Nov. 14: Stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky agrees to pay $100 million to settle charges of trading on insider information. He also agrees to cooperate with investigators and to plead guilty to a single, unspecified criminal charge. 1987 March 19: Boyd L. Jefferies, founder of the Los Angeles securities firm Jefferies & Co., agrees to plead guilty to two criminal charges involving securities law violations, including one deal involving Boesky. He is not accused of insider trading.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Boyd L. Jefferies, the former Los Angeles stockbroker who helped bring about some of the largest U.S. corporate takeovers, was spared a prison term today but was fined $250,000 for helping Ivan F. Boesky file false records. Jefferies, 58, also was sentenced to five years' probation, although he can ask to have that reduced after three years. He is barred from the securities industry but can apply to re-enter it five years after his probation ends. U.S.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Boyd Jefferies, who has admitted breaking the law with Wall Street's once-powerful stock speculator Ivan Boesky, has told a federal judge he believed that he was "bending the rules" at the time. "I am certainly disgraced by my actions in 1984, 1985 and 1986," Jefferies told Judge Morris Lasker, according to a transcript of a pre-sentence hearing made available Friday. "I knew at the time I was bending the rules," Jefferies said in the hearing Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Former brokerage executive Boyd Jefferies said Wednesday that he illegally accumulated stock for corporate raider Paul Bilzerian, who wanted to conceal his stakes in various takeover targets. Jefferies, looking tanned and fit, testified at the trial of the 38-year-old Singer Co. chairman, who is charged with 11 counts of securities and tax fraud, conspiracy and making false statements to the government. If convicted, Bilzerian, a Tampa, Fla., investor, faces a maximum sentence of 55 years in prison and nearly $2.8 million in fines.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1989 | From Reuters
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall issued an order Sunday night temporarily halting the second trial of the GAF Corp. pending further proceedings, the company said. Marshall issued the stay to allow defense attorneys for GAF to prepare arguments that the second trial amounted to double jeopardy, which is forbidden by the Constitution. Marshall gave government prosecutors until 11 a.m. EST Wednesday to respond. On Jan.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1987 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Boyd L. Jefferies is providing information to federal authorities in their continuing investigation of insider trading and other abuses in the high-stakes world of corporate takeovers. In a telephone interview with The Times last week, the former Los Angeles securities trader acknowledged that he is cooperating as part of his plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office in New York.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1986 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
At a cocktail party in New York a few years ago, an institutional trader was asked why he conducted his business through Boyd L. Jefferies, head of Jefferies Group in Los Angeles, and not through a more established firm located in the Big Apple. "I don't give a damn where he works," the trader snapped. "He calls me a half-hour earlier in the morning than anyone else, and he has a lot of useful information."
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Boyd L. Jefferies, the former Los Angeles stockbroker who helped bring about some of the largest U.S. corporate takeovers, was spared a prison term today but was fined $250,000 for helping Ivan F. Boesky file false records. Jefferies, 58, also was sentenced to five years' probation, although he can ask to have that reduced after three years. He is barred from the securities industry but can apply to re-enter it five years after his probation ends. U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In a case indicating that the government's probe of Wall Street practices has significantly broadened, Boyd L. Jefferies, chairman and founder of the Los Angeles brokerage Jefferies & Co., resigned from the firm Thursday and said he will plead guilty to two federal felony counts. One of the charges is related to illegal stock trades he executed with stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1987 | TOM FURLONG and BILL SING, Times Staff Writers
Boyd L. Jefferies' announcement Thursday that he had agreed to plead guilty to securities violations and resign from his Los Angeles-based brokerage marks the downfall of a master stockbroker and innovator. The news from the 56-year-old entrepreneur dumbfounded some associates and admirers who knew him for his legendary devotion to job and clients. "I always thought he was a straight shooter--aggressive but on this side of the law," said one professional money manager in New York.
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