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Boysenberries

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
All of those plump, juicy, dark red boysenberries in the world can be traced to their roots in Knott's Berry Farm. More than 60 years ago, theme park founder and farmer Walter Knott was always looking for crops he could grow better than other farmers, said Patsy Marshall, Knott's historian. And the boysenberry, a cross between a loganberry, red raspberry and blackberry, became Knott's Berry Farm's claim to fame--in pies, jams and jellies.
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FOOD
June 13, 2013
Once fairly hard to find at farmers markets, locally grown berries are everywhere now: raspberries (both red and golden), blackberries, olallieberries, boysenberries, loganberries, marionberries and even locally grown blueberries. Though raspberries are familiar to most everyone, some of the others might need a little sorting out. Loganberry is an old California variety (found in Santa Cruz in the 1880s) that is a cross between raspberry and blackberry. Boysenberries are another California cross (Napa in the 1920s)
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FOOD
June 13, 2013
Once fairly hard to find at farmers markets, locally grown berries are everywhere now: raspberries (both red and golden), blackberries, olallieberries, boysenberries, loganberries, marionberries and even locally grown blueberries. Though raspberries are familiar to most everyone, some of the others might need a little sorting out. Loganberry is an old California variety (found in Santa Cruz in the 1880s) that is a cross between raspberry and blackberry. Boysenberries are another California cross (Napa in the 1920s)
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By David Karp
This week may be the best of the year for high-flavored fruit that's worth a special trip to local farmers markets, because it's almost never available elsewhere. Start with boysenberries, whose rich, complex, sweet-tart flavor reflects their ancestry, part raspberry, part trailing blackberry. To be at their best, they must be picked dead-ripe, when they're too soft and perishable for supermarkets, and even at farmers market just a few vendors take the trouble. Look for containers in which all or most of the berries are deep purple, indicating full ripeness; less ripe berries are better for baking or making preserves.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | Susan Christian
BERRY BELOVED: Orange County is home to Leo Fender's electric guitar and Hobie Alter's lightweight catamaran. But little is made of its most famous invention--the boysenberry, a graft of the loganberry, raspberry and blackberry. . . . Anaheim farmer Rudolph Boysen concocted the hybrid, Walter Knott popularized it in the 1930s, and now it's popular in jams and yogurts. "I doubt that anyone stops to think about the boysenberry's origin," notes Marion Knott, Walter's daughter.
FOOD
May 27, 2010
  Apricot boysenberry tarts Total time: 2 hours, plus chilling and freezing times Servings: Makes 2 (9-inch) tarts, each serving 6 Note: Recipe adapted from "Good to the Grain" by Kim Boyce with Amy Scattergood Rustic rye dough 1 cup (4 ounces) rye flour 1 cup (4.25 ounces) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold butter 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 5 to 6 tablespoons ice water 1. Sift the rye and all-purpose flours, sugar and salt into a large bowl, adding back any bits of grain or other ingredients that may remain in the sifter.
FOOD
June 18, 2003
  Time: 15 minutes, plus 1 hour standing Servings: 6 Note: Make a batch of Kimberly Boyce's vanilla ice cream first, using 1 1/2 cups cream and 1 1/2 cups milk. 1 pound boysenberries 2/3 cup sugar 3 cups vanilla ice cream 1. Make a boysenberry purée by tossing the berries and the sugar together and setting the mixture in a warm place to macerate for 1 hour. You can heat the mixture in a 200-degree oven for 30 minutes to speed up the process.
REAL ESTATE
June 8, 1997 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
I have to admire the restraint of neighbors who walk by our boysenberries--so fat and ripe they are about to burst--and don't pick one. We grow them on a picket fence in the frontyard and, though the fence is set back from the sidewalk several feet, they are within reach. We've been picking a bowlful every morning for several weeks, and I can say, through berry-stained lips, that boysenberries are one of those fruits and vegetables that are so much better home-grown.
FOOD
May 27, 2010
Boysenberry-strawberry glazed pie Total time: 30 minutes, plus chilling time Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from Patricia Poole of Kincaid Farms in Redlands. She says, "The idea of using strawberries is that they are less expensive than boysenberries. Try not to eat the whole pie if anyone is watching." 1 pint boysenberries, divided, more as desired for assembly 1 cup water 1/3 to 3/4 cup sugar 3 tablespoons cornstarch Pinch of salt 1 pint strawberries (sliced if they're large)
FOOD
May 27, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To the uninitiated, the boysenberry may look like a big, blowzy, underripe blackberry, but it is in fact a noble fruit, as distinct from a common blackberry as a thoroughbred is from a mule. Large, dark purple, juicy and intense, it derives its unique flavor from its complex ancestry: sweetness and floral aroma from its raspberry grandmother, and a winy, feral tang from three native blackberry species. It's a California classic, emblematic of the joys of growing up in the Southland before it succumbed completely to sprawl.
FOOD
June 3, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The first month of the summer fruit season is like a roller coaster: a frustratingly slow buildup, with many mediocre early varieties, gives way suddenly to a whoosh of fantastic flavors. The fruit calendar has been about a week later than usual because of cool spring weather, but finally markets are abounding, if one knows where to look, with classic Bing cherries, flavorful Robada apricots, aromatic Flavorella plumcots and complex Boysenberries. So much fruit, so little stomach! Good or very good cherries actually have been available for several weeks.
FOOD
May 27, 2010
  Apricot boysenberry tarts Total time: 2 hours, plus chilling and freezing times Servings: Makes 2 (9-inch) tarts, each serving 6 Note: Recipe adapted from "Good to the Grain" by Kim Boyce with Amy Scattergood Rustic rye dough 1 cup (4 ounces) rye flour 1 cup (4.25 ounces) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold butter 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 5 to 6 tablespoons ice water 1. Sift the rye and all-purpose flours, sugar and salt into a large bowl, adding back any bits of grain or other ingredients that may remain in the sifter.
FOOD
May 27, 2010
Boysenberry-strawberry glazed pie Total time: 30 minutes, plus chilling time Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from Patricia Poole of Kincaid Farms in Redlands. She says, "The idea of using strawberries is that they are less expensive than boysenberries. Try not to eat the whole pie if anyone is watching." 1 pint boysenberries, divided, more as desired for assembly 1 cup water 1/3 to 3/4 cup sugar 3 tablespoons cornstarch Pinch of salt 1 pint strawberries (sliced if they're large)
FOOD
May 27, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To the uninitiated, the boysenberry may look like a big, blowzy, underripe blackberry, but it is in fact a noble fruit, as distinct from a common blackberry as a thoroughbred is from a mule. Large, dark purple, juicy and intense, it derives its unique flavor from its complex ancestry: sweetness and floral aroma from its raspberry grandmother, and a winy, feral tang from three native blackberry species. It's a California classic, emblematic of the joys of growing up in the Southland before it succumbed completely to sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2005 | Andrew Greenstein, Special to The Times
For years, the small wooden tearoom stood by itself, a remote stop on the way to the beach where travelers could swing by for a hearty meal of fried chicken and warm homemade biscuits, not to mention the prized boysenberry jam. The old tearoom near Beach Boulevard is still there, buried now by its surroundings: seven sprawling dining rooms, rows of new buildings, billboards and one of America's best known amusement parks -- Knott's Berry Farm. Mrs.
FOOD
June 18, 2003
  Time: 15 minutes, plus 1 hour standing Servings: 6 Note: Make a batch of Kimberly Boyce's vanilla ice cream first, using 1 1/2 cups cream and 1 1/2 cups milk. 1 pound boysenberries 2/3 cup sugar 3 cups vanilla ice cream 1. Make a boysenberry purée by tossing the berries and the sugar together and setting the mixture in a warm place to macerate for 1 hour. You can heat the mixture in a 200-degree oven for 30 minutes to speed up the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2005 | Andrew Greenstein, Special to The Times
For years, the small wooden tearoom stood by itself, a remote stop on the way to the beach where travelers could swing by for a hearty meal of fried chicken and warm homemade biscuits, not to mention the prized boysenberry jam. The old tearoom near Beach Boulevard is still there, buried now by its surroundings: seven sprawling dining rooms, rows of new buildings, billboards and one of America's best known amusement parks -- Knott's Berry Farm. Mrs.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By David Karp
This week may be the best of the year for high-flavored fruit that's worth a special trip to local farmers markets, because it's almost never available elsewhere. Start with boysenberries, whose rich, complex, sweet-tart flavor reflects their ancestry, part raspberry, part trailing blackberry. To be at their best, they must be picked dead-ripe, when they're too soft and perishable for supermarkets, and even at farmers market just a few vendors take the trouble. Look for containers in which all or most of the berries are deep purple, indicating full ripeness; less ripe berries are better for baking or making preserves.
REAL ESTATE
June 8, 1997 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
I have to admire the restraint of neighbors who walk by our boysenberries--so fat and ripe they are about to burst--and don't pick one. We grow them on a picket fence in the frontyard and, though the fence is set back from the sidewalk several feet, they are within reach. We've been picking a bowlful every morning for several weeks, and I can say, through berry-stained lips, that boysenberries are one of those fruits and vegetables that are so much better home-grown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
All of those plump, juicy, dark red boysenberries in the world can be traced to their roots in Knott's Berry Farm. More than 60 years ago, theme park founder and farmer Walter Knott was always looking for crops he could grow better than other farmers, said Patsy Marshall, Knott's historian. And the boysenberry, a cross between a loganberry, red raspberry and blackberry, became Knott's Berry Farm's claim to fame--in pies, jams and jellies.
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