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Brad Gates

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Loretta Sanchez wants to make one thing clear: She has not endorsed Orange County Marshal Michael S. Carona for county sheriff in 1998. But Carona, who formally announced his candidacy Friday, wants to make something else clear: The Democratic congresswoman from Garden Grove is supporting him over incumbent Sheriff Brad Gates. Who's right? Apparently, both. The distinction between "endorsement" and "support" may be lost on the voting public, but to politicians it is vital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY and SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Turning against one of the most enduring fixtures in Orange County government, a formidable lineup of conservative power brokers is brushing aside longtime Sheriff Brad Gates to back county Marshal Michael Carona in next year's race for top cop. The coalition of conservatives backing Carona, who is expected to announce his entry into the sheriff's race today, includes nearly the entire Orange County statehouse delegation as well as numerous mayors, congressmen and other county politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi, the two top law enforcement officials in Orange County, will apparently face serious political challenges if they decide to run for reelection in 1998. Most of the interest at this early date appears to be in Capizzi's seat, at least partially because he is exploring a run for state attorney general.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pot as medicine may now be the law in California, but that doesn't mean Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates has to like it. Gates was a statewide leader in fighting the state's new medical marijuana law, approved by voters as Proposition 215 on Nov. 5. Now he is trying to make it as tough as possible to use medical cannabis under the new state rules. His chief ally is federal law. Proposition 215 legalized marijuana for medical use in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors will decide next week whether to grant Sheriff Brad Gates a 9.1% raise that would boost his base salary to $126,200 a year. Board Chairman Roger R. Stanton proposed the salary increase, which he described as long overdue, given the sheriff's "considerable contributions to the County of Orange and as a key member of the county's management team." Gates' salary is now $115,000--several thousand dollars less than the base pay earned by Dist. Atty. Michael R.
NEWS
September 16, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is the sheriff of Orange County, the most vocal law-and-order man in California's most conservative of counties. The other is a graying widow from Mission Viejo who lives five minutes up the freeway from the sheriff. Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates and Anna Boyce might seem unlikely foes. But the 6-foot-4 sheriff and the 5-foot-1 nurse have squared off as leaders of opposing camps in the fight over Proposition 215, the medical marijuana initiative on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi kicked off a statewide fight Tuesday against a ballot measure to allow cultivation of marijuana for medicinal purposes, calling the measure a thinly veiled ploy to legalize the drug. At a Capitol news conference, Gates announced formation of "Citizens for a Drug-Free California" and immediately went on the offensive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Marshal Michael S. Carona is challenging Sheriff Brad Gates to a political shootout over the county's distribution of millions of dollars in tax funds earmarked for law enforcement. Carona, who generally keeps a low profile, is asking the county to give his agency $2.2 million of the more than $149 million expected to be channeled into the county next year under Proposition 172, a sales tax that raises money for law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1995 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An investor is suing a San Juan Capistrano equestrian center that includes Sheriff Brad Gates and his wife as partners, alleging more than $250,000 in rent has been due since 1993. Chicago-based Burns Family Foundation, one of several partners in the 17-acre property, is demanding the equestrian center pay up or face eviction, according to the lawsuit filed Wednesday in Orange County Superior Court.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | MATT LAIT and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sheriff Brad Gates insisted Wednesday that he did not push a multimillion-dollar settlement for the family of a slain deputy, but notes taken by the county's top official at a key meeting said Gates took part and "disagreed" with a county attorney's recommendation not to settle. Gates said he attended only that one meeting, and that he was there merely to present the facts of the case.
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