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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002
They said "The Producers" wouldn't survive on Broadway without its stars--then Brad Oscar came to the rescue. Plus: Bruce Springsteen, haunted by Sept. 11; the woman at the helm of "K-19: The Widowmaker"; and dancing without athleticism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | Josh Getlin
Working in a hit show and basking in critics' praise seemed like a dream. But when Mel Brooks kissed him on the cheek, Brad Oscar knew he had arrived. The big moment came during a recording session for "The Producers" cast album, when Brooks marveled over his young star's rise from obscurity to a featured role in New York's hottest musical: "This usually doesn't happen on Broadway," he said, hugging the beaming actor. "But it happened with this show, and when it did, we knew we had found gold."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to know musicals to appreciate "Forbidden Broadway 1994," the revue at the Tiffany. Its clever lampoons of Broadway icons might be lost on those who don't. Among its two-dozen sketches is a "Sunset Boulevard" takeoff mounted by the New York-based company for L.A. Without giving away the jokes, let's just say that writer-director Gerard Alessandrini not only puts Glenn Close (Susanne Blakeslee) and Patti LuPone (Christine Pedi) on the same stage and incorporates elements of the "Sunset" plot into their rivalry, but he also throws in Joe (Brad Oscar)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN
It's exhausting to be the king. Minutes after the curtain falls on "The Producers," with cheers still ringing in his ears, Brad Oscar hustles up the stairs to his second-floor dressing room in the St. James Theatre and tries to catch his breath. He's drenched in sweat. He's yawning every two minutes. As the clock inches past 11:30 on a steamy night, his friendly blue eyes have the slightly dazed look of a man who has won the war but taken a beating.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | Josh Getlin
Working in a hit show and basking in critics' praise seemed like a dream. But when Mel Brooks kissed him on the cheek, Brad Oscar knew he had arrived. The big moment came during a recording session for "The Producers" cast album, when Brooks marveled over his young star's rise from obscurity to a featured role in New York's hottest musical: "This usually doesn't happen on Broadway," he said, hugging the beaming actor. "But it happened with this show, and when it did, we knew we had found gold."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN
It's exhausting to be the king. Minutes after the curtain falls on "The Producers," with cheers still ringing in his ears, Brad Oscar hustles up the stairs to his second-floor dressing room in the St. James Theatre and tries to catch his breath. He's drenched in sweat. He's yawning every two minutes. As the clock inches past 11:30 on a steamy night, his friendly blue eyes have the slightly dazed look of a man who has won the war but taken a beating.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004
"Hairspray" producer Adam Epstein has signed David Javerbaum of "The Daily Show" and Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of Wayne to write the songs for the musical stage version of John Waters' 1990 comedy "Cry-Baby," according to Variety. Brad Oscar and Roger Bart will step into the roles of Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom in "The Producers."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
Talk about being in demand: Hunter Foster, nominated for a 2004 Tony Award for his portrayal of the mild-mannered clerk in "Little Shop of Horrors," will leave that Broadway show June 6 and nine days later will join the cast of Mel Brooks' "The Producers." Foster will replace Roger Bart in the role of Leo Bloom, with Brad Oscar continuing as Max Bialystock.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
"The Producers" was named best musical of 2004 at the London Critics' Circle Theatre Awards, while the National Theatre dominated the drama prizes. The Mel Brooks musical, a popular and critical hit since its November opening, has had its share of backstage troubles. The show lost original star Richard Dreyfuss three weeks before opening. His replacement, Nathan Lane, was forced to pull out two weeks early due to a back injury. Brad Oscar is now starring in the London production.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2004 | From Associated Press
Back problems have forced Nathan Lane to quit the London West End run of "The Producers" almost two weeks earlier than planned. Lane has pulled out of five performances of the Mel Brooks musical since Dec. 16 after suffering two slipped discs. The 48-year-old actor has been advised to cancel his remaining performances, the musical's producers said Tuesday. Lane, who had been reprising his Tony-winning role from Broadway, was told he should recover in about six weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002
They said "The Producers" wouldn't survive on Broadway without its stars--then Brad Oscar came to the rescue. Plus: Bruce Springsteen, haunted by Sept. 11; the woman at the helm of "K-19: The Widowmaker"; and dancing without athleticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to know musicals to appreciate "Forbidden Broadway 1994," the revue at the Tiffany. Its clever lampoons of Broadway icons might be lost on those who don't. Among its two-dozen sketches is a "Sunset Boulevard" takeoff mounted by the New York-based company for L.A. Without giving away the jokes, let's just say that writer-director Gerard Alessandrini not only puts Glenn Close (Susanne Blakeslee) and Patti LuPone (Christine Pedi) on the same stage and incorporates elements of the "Sunset" plot into their rivalry, but he also throws in Joe (Brad Oscar)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The new musical “Big Fish” has itself reeled in a big catch: the Neil Simon Theatre.   Based on Daniel Wallace's 1998 novel and the 2003 film directed by Tim Burton, the in-development production has had its eye on Broadway for several years; with a theater now secured, it's set to open Oct. 6 in New York. Directed and choreographed by Susan Stroman, who has five Tony wins under her belt, “Big Fish” will star two-time Tony Award winner Norbert Leo Butz (“Catch Me If You Can,” “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels”)
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