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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1985
The Times has missed the point in its editorial (July 23), "Blind Morality." The House of Representatives is accused of censorship in cutting a $103,000 allotment for the production of Playboy magazine in Braille. There is no censorship here, ladies and gentlemen. Private persons or industry is perfectly free to provide unlimited numbers of Playboy copies in Braille. Indeed, Hugh Hefner may wish to foot the bill himself. No government body will interfere. But the expenditure of taxpayers' money?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
UC Berkeley is making its vast library collections and course textbooks more readily available to students with visual and other impairments under an agreement reached Tuesday that could set a precedent for universities nationwide. The settlement with the nonprofit legal group Disability Rights Advocates was reached after more than a year of negotiations and will provide students with physical, developmental, learning and visual disabilities more timely access to printed materials in alternative formats such as Braille, large print and audio.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
In South Africa, restaurant chain Wimpy is welcoming blind customers -- by serving them burgers with words in Braille spelled out on their buns with sesame seeds. In a viral YouTube video promoting its in-store Braille menus, the company shows the seeds being meticulously placed onto the bread with tweezers before being baked. Diners at three Braille organizations were then given the 15 burgers, which were marked with descriptions such as “100% pure beef.” Fast-food advertising has always been heavy on the gimmicks and envelope-pushing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
UC Berkeley is making its vast library collections and course textbooks more readily available to students with visual and other impairments under an agreement reached Tuesday that could set a precedent for universities nationwide. The settlement with the nonprofit legal group Disability Rights Advocates was reached after more than a year of negotiations and will provide students with physical, developmental, learning and visual disabilities more timely access to printed materials in alternative formats such as Braille, large print and audio.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Blind and visually impaired visitors now can rely on a set of maps in Braille to get their bearings around the monuments and landmarks of the nation's capital. The tactile maps, carrying legends in English and Braille, were produced under a $150,000 federal contract. The 14-by-19-inch plastic sheets depict such landmarks as the Lincoln Memorial, the White House and the Washington Monument.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW KAREN KAPLAN
Electronic books may attract an unexpected audience: blind readers. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a Commerce Department agency in Gaithersburg, Md., have developed a way to convert the text of e-books into Braille. With about $200 worth of materials, they were able to build a prototype Braille reader that rivals commercial systems that cost between $10,000 and $15,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999
Re "Technology Replacing Braille," July 28: I have worked for the last four to five years with many blind friends and students and must take issue with several things. Regarding the statement that increasing reliance on tape recorders, letter magnifiers and computer voice translators leaves the visually impaired with a shaky grasp of the underlying structure of language: If a blind or visually impaired person has a piece of text or a book on a computer screen and is reading it with ears, word by word or letter by letter, along with all punctuation, how does this make for illiteracy any more than a person who is reading it with fingers word by word or letter by letter?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ
Kent Cullers has never shied from challenges. Blind since birth, he nevertheless became a National Merit Scholar and valedictorian at Temple City High School. He studied psychology and earned a doctoral degree in physics, becoming the first completely blind physicist in the United States. Cullers was also one of the first scientists to search for signs of life beyond Earth, helping to found the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View.
OPINION
April 21, 2013
Name your favorite, the one book that most sticks in your mind. Over nearly four years, photographer Catherine Wagner made that request of friends, acquaintances and outright strangers. She kept a tally on her iPhone and turned the top vote-getters into the spine of her latest work, "trans/literate," an homage to books - the cardboard and paper sort that some predict won't survive the 21st century. The list of titles and authors reads like an exceptionally weighty version of English 101. "Most people went back to their teenage years, to high school or college," Wagner said.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Would anyone describe typing on an iPhone as a pleasant experience? I think the answer lies in all those "sent from iPhone, excuse any iTypos" signatures out there. Here to texters' rescue is Braille Touch, a new app that enables people to type messages on an Android or iOS touch screen without having to look down. The app is designed for people who are visually impaired, but that doesn't mean the rest of us can't use it too. "We have become slaves to keyboards that are too small and that have too many buttons," Mario Romero, a post-doctoral fellow at Georgia Tech's School for Interactive Computing and the lead researcher on a paper about Braille Touch, said in an interview with The Times.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
In South Africa, restaurant chain Wimpy is welcoming blind customers -- by serving them burgers with words in Braille spelled out on their buns with sesame seeds. In a viral YouTube video promoting its in-store Braille menus, the company shows the seeds being meticulously placed onto the bread with tweezers before being baked. Diners at three Braille organizations were then given the 15 burgers, which were marked with descriptions such as “100% pure beef.” Fast-food advertising has always been heavy on the gimmicks and envelope-pushing.
NEWS
November 7, 2010 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wenger's Braille Watch ($219.95) has a mineral crystal face that flips open for access to raised numerical markers that allow sight-impaired wearers to read the time by touch. The watch has a stainless-steel casing and a leather strap with a butterfly clasp that snaps easily onto the wrist. The reinforced hands are designed to hold up to touch-reading. Info: Maxi-Aids , (800) 522-6294.    
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2010 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Fingers fly over the raised dots, doing the work that eyes cannot. Eleven children in yellow T-shirts are reading one of three passages — "Rainy Day Fun," "Two Great Vacation Ideas" and "Velveteen Rabbit." Then they turn to their Perkins Braillers, which look like a manual typewriter with just nine keys, and stamp out answers to questions that test their reading comprehension. "I'm not very nervous," 9-year-old Ashlee Thao said before the 50-minute test began. "I got all of the nervousness out of my mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Samuel M. Genensky, a former Rand Corp. mathematician and inventor whose near-blindness led him to help others cope with limited eyesight and become more self-sufficient, died June 26 at his Santa Monica home. He was 81. The cause was complications of heart disease, said LaDonna Ringering, president and chief executive of the Center for the Partially Sighted, a West Los Angeles facility that Genensky founded in 1978.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The prototype of the first U.S. coin with readable Braille characters was introduced Wednesday -- a silver dollar commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Louis Braille, the creator of the alphabet for the blind. The coin's display opened the National Federation of the Blind's annual convention in Dallas. "This is going to put Braille in front of people in a very dramatic way," said Chris Danielson, a federation spokesman. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert W. Mann, 81, a mechanical engineer and designer who helped create a Braille printing machine and advanced prosthetic joints, died of a heart attack June 16 in Moultonborough, N.H. An early practitioner in the field of rehabilitation engineering, Mann began guiding students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1950s. Mann and others at MIT worked on a computer program for translating English text into Braille in the 1960s and '70s.
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