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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ
Kent Cullers has never shied from challenges. Blind since birth, he nevertheless became a National Merit Scholar and valedictorian at Temple City High School. He studied psychology and earned a doctoral degree in physics, becoming the first completely blind physicist in the United States. Cullers was also one of the first scientists to search for signs of life beyond Earth, helping to found the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
The Braille Institute Orange County is seeking volunteers to teach the blind and visually impaired. Teaching experience is not required, and only a few hours a week are necessary to participate, said Mary Johnson, volunteer services coordinator. Participants have 140 classes to choose from, including world cultures and stress management, Johnson said. "We have to make sure we are meeting everyone's needs," she said. "We serve from infants on up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
A free introductory lecture on the Braille Institute's services will be held today at the Lakeview Senior Center. The lecture will take place from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. New ways of doing daily tasks, such as identifying money and dining with ease, will also be discussed. Braille Institute is a private, nonprofit organization providing free programs and services for Southern California residents who are blind or visually impaired. Information: (714) 821-5000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
The Braille Institute is offering classes beginning Jan. 16 for those who have recently lost their vision. The classes will be held from 9:15 to 11:15 a.m. at the Lakeview Senior Center, Lake Road at Alton Parkway. During the 12-week program, students will learn how to travel safely and identify surroundings; techniques for handling money, cooking and other daily tasks; and skills needed to read and write Braille. Information: (714) 821-5000, Ext. 229.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
A blind physicist who wants to advance a Braille system for computers had his grant request rejected by the Education Department because his typewritten application wasn't double-spaced. "I'm blind. I couldn't tell it was single-spaced," said John Gardner, an Oregon State University professor and expert in new information technologies for the disabled. Gardner said his assistant mistakenly typed the application single-spaced and in a font smaller than the department prefers.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | CHRIS ALLBRITTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was a bright day when Norman Coombs went blind. In October 1940, he was getting into boyish mischief in a neighborhood park when a wayward stick poked his eye, leaving him blind. As a student, Coombs had to rely on others to read to him. As a professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, he couldn't look up the book he wrote. But with the help of computers, Coombs taught classes by e-mailing and chatting online with students, many also disabled.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | DAWN FALLIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Harold Johnson spends much of his time making maps of places he cannot visit, for the benefit of people who cannot see. Johnson translates maps into Braille. It is hard work--exacting work--but he has the time; he is an inmate at the Nebraska State Penitentiary, serving up to 45 years for burglary and sexual assault. "It takes me about two to three days to do one map," he says. He is proud of his work; he keeps a scrapbook, and shows off colorless maps of Mexico, Nebraska, the United States.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | JENNIFER BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ruth Reaves used to take up to a month to copy a song into Braille, which meant her blind students would perform only about eight songs at their annual spring concert. This spring, however, the 35-student band at the Alabama School for the Blind performed 20 songs. Each took about four hours to translate into Braille. The difference? Software by Dancing Dots Braille Music Technology that translates computer music files into Braille.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | ZAHIDA HAFEEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 61 years, Jacques Voelzke has traveled the world as an intelligence officer, driven around the country selling parts to the aerospace industry and danced professionally in a Chicago club. Of all the lessons he had learned, none had prepared him for blindness. When he lost his sight two years ago, the Costa Mesa resident, in tears, turned to his only child for help. "He was very upset," said Jacques Voelzke Jr., 33, who lives in Portland, Ore. "He called me in panic."
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