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Brain Cancer

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NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Brain tumors may soon encounter a new weapon. The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new device that uses electrical energy to kill brain cancer cells. The device, approved for those who have malignant tumors known as glioblastoma multiforme, adds a potential new alternative to chemotherapy for patients with advanced brain tumors. The device, called NovoTTF, delivers low-intensity electrical fields directly to a patient’s scalp via four electrodes. The electrical fields appear to interfere with the process of cell division, halting the tumor’s growth.
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NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Fashion blogger and designer Aimee Song of Song of Style and Soul Cycle are hosting a charity ride to benefit the Thompson-Mason Brain Cancer Foundation . The ride consists of a one-hour stationary bike class from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Soul Cycle West Hollywood, 8570 Sunset Blvd. in Sunset Plaza. The event is sponsored by Soffe Apparel . Tickets are $40 and may be purchased on eventbrite . All proceed are earmarked for the foundation, which aims to help low-income patients and their families.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla, This post has been corrected. Please see below for details.
Valerie Harper, diagnosed with terminal brain cancer in January and given three to six months to live, has defied the odds and as of June was close to remission, the actress and her doctor revealed Thursday morning on the " Today " show. The 74-year-old "Rhoda" star, who went public with her diagnosis in March, has combined chemotherapy with Eastern options including acupuncture and Chinese tea. Harper has the rare condition leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which occurs when cancer spreads to the fluid-filled membranes that surround the brain.
SPORTS
November 21, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Michael Weiner, who spent his adult life representing Major League Baseball players and rose to become their leader during an era of unprecedented prosperity and labor peace, died Thursday. He was 51. Weiner was diagnosed last summer with inoperable brain cancer. The union said Weiner died at his New Jersey home, surrounded by his wife and three daughters. His casual manner and dress belied his stature as one of the most brilliant lawyers to work in sports, and his popularity extended beyond the union to the commissioner's office, and to the very executives against whom he negotiated.
HEALTH
June 15, 2009 | Chris Woolston
In the short time they've been around, cellphones have changed the world. Just 20 years ago -- if you can believe it -- you had to discuss dinner plans before you arrived at the grocery store. And just 20 years ago, you didn't have to field work calls until you were actually at work. Cellphones gave us new ways to stay connected. For some, they also provided a new reason for worry. Cellphones release microwave radiation when they're in use, a fact that inevitably led to fears of brain cancer.
SPORTS
November 21, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Michael Weiner, who spent his adult life representing Major League Baseball players and rose to become their leader during an era of unprecedented prosperity and labor peace, died Thursday. He was 51. Weiner was diagnosed last summer with inoperable brain cancer. The union said Weiner died at his New Jersey home, surrounded by his wife and three daughters. His casual manner and dress belied his stature as one of the most brilliant lawyers to work in sports, and his popularity extended beyond the union to the commissioner's office, and to the very executives against whom he negotiated.
SPORTS
July 16, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
NEW YORK -- Michael Weiner, the executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn., rolled into the hotel ballroom in a wheelchair. He had been diagnosed last year with brain cancer, and his condition has taken a turn for the worse in the last month. "I can't move my right side," he said. "I can't walk. I can't move my right arm at all. " He said he is trying experimental medication. He continues to work, and he engaged a meeting of the Baseball Writers Assn. of America in a detail-oriented discussion of the Biogenesis investigation, which could result in player suspensions en masse, within weeks.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Brain cancer has increased by up to 500% among elderly Americans, a trend that an expert at the National Cancer Institute calls "alarming" because the disease is almost always fatal. "It once was considered that brain tumors reached a peak rate (among people in their 30s) and then would rapidly decline in the older population, but it now appears that the incidence continues to increase with age," said Nigel H. Greig, a National Institute on Aging researcher. "I think it is alarming."
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | Associated Press
The development of brain cancer is strongly linked to the lack of a protein that repairs DNA damage, University of Washington researchers have found. The protein, known as MGMT, defends brain cells against damage caused by nitrosamines, a cancer-causing chemical found in such products as beer, bacon and tobacco smoke. Many people who develop brain tumors lack enough MGMT to repair DNA damage caused by those agents, the researchers said.
NEWS
September 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first significant new treatment for brain cancer in two decades--a drug that is inserted into brain tissue from which a tumor has been removed. The procedure fights malignant glioma, a fast-spreading cancer that affects about 8,000 people in America each year, by delivering the drug directly to the tumor site in high concentrations. The disease has proved resistant to conventional treatment methods like surgery and radiation.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
An amateur athlete fighting a continuing battle against brain cancer is set to rappel 365 feet down the side of San Diego's Hyatt building alongside an "American Idol" winner. BethAnn Telford of Washington, D.C., is in Southern California for charity events to call attention to children who are battling brain cancer. Telford, a special events coordinator at the U.S. Government Printing Office, loves to run, bike and swim. After being diagnosed eight years ago with brain cancer, she put together a bucket list.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla, This post has been corrected. Please see below for details.
Valerie Harper, diagnosed with terminal brain cancer in January and given three to six months to live, has defied the odds and as of June was close to remission, the actress and her doctor revealed Thursday morning on the " Today " show. The 74-year-old "Rhoda" star, who went public with her diagnosis in March, has combined chemotherapy with Eastern options including acupuncture and Chinese tea. Harper has the rare condition leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which occurs when cancer spreads to the fluid-filled membranes that surround the brain.
SPORTS
July 20, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Michael Weiner can return a smile. He cannot return a handshake, at least not with his right hand. So he extended his left hand, over and over again, to the biggest stars and most prominent executives in baseball. It was remarkable, in every sense of the word, to see him on the field at the All-Star game. He can no longer walk, so he sat in a wheelchair, moving when someone else could push him. He can no longer control his right side, so his right arm was strapped to a shelf attached to the wheelchair.
SPORTS
July 16, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
NEW YORK -- Michael Weiner, the executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn., rolled into the hotel ballroom in a wheelchair. He had been diagnosed last year with brain cancer, and his condition has taken a turn for the worse in the last month. "I can't move my right side," he said. "I can't walk. I can't move my right arm at all. " He said he is trying experimental medication. He continues to work, and he engaged a meeting of the Baseball Writers Assn. of America in a detail-oriented discussion of the Biogenesis investigation, which could result in player suspensions en masse, within weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who later accused the administration of failing to live up to the president's promise of "compassionate conservatism," died Friday of cancer. Kuo's family announced his death Saturday on his Facebook page. "Last night at 10:25 our beloved David found his reward in heaven, with his savior Jesus Christ," the family wrote. "With a peaceful last breath, he won his courageous 10-year battle against brain cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013
Actress Valerie Harper plans to discuss her brain cancer with some television doctors. The daytime talk show "The Doctors" said Harper will appear Monday to talk with Travis Stork, Lisa Masterson and Andrew Ordon, as well as her own team of doctors. The 1970s sitcom star has been diagnosed with a rare brain cancer and told she has as little as three months to live. She said her husband briefly withheld the diagnosis from her because it was so dire. Harper, now 73, played Rhoda Morgenstern on television's "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and its spinoff, "Rhoda.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
Scientists will attack brain cancers by infecting tumor cells with a herpes gene and then killing the cancer with a herpes drug, under an experimental therapy approved by a federal committee Monday. The experimental therapy, proposed by medical scientists at the University of Iowa, was approved unanimously Monday by a National Institutes of Health committee. It now must be approved by the NIH director and by the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Kenneth W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Valerie Harper's announcement this week that she has been diagnosed with terminal brain cancer sent a shock wave through her fan base, who remembers her as the feisty and lovable Rhoda Morgenstern from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and "Rhoda. " But now that the news has had a few days to sink in, she's talking about it in depth. Harper will appear on NBC's "Today" and the syndicated daytime talk show "The Doctors" on Monday to discuss her diagnosis with the show's hosts. She'll also appear on CBS' "The Talk" on Wednesday.
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