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Brain Cancer

HEALTH
December 11, 2006 | From Times wire reports
A protein that inhibits the growth of cancer-causing stem cells and turns them into normal brain cells may become an effective therapy for deadly brain tumors, researchers have reported in the journal Nature. A team led by Angelo Vescovi of the University of Milan-Bicocca in Italy took cancer stem cells removed from people with glioblastomas, the deadliest kind of primary brain cancer, and exposed them in a laboratory dish to a protein called BMP.
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SPORTS
March 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
Tug McGraw was diagnosed with brain cancer and doctors were trying to determine if they could operate, a source close to the former relief pitcher said Friday. The doctors found at least two tumors, the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity. The diagnosis of cancer was confirmed by a second source close to McGraw, also on condition of anonymity. "This reminds you how short life is," said Philadelphia Phillie Manager Larry Bowa, who would not give details of McGraw's condition.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Republican National Chairman Lee Atwater was admitted to New York's Montefiore Medical Center Monday to undergo an innovative radiation treatment for brain cancer--a growth initially said to be non-malignant when Atwater's illness first became known last month.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | From Reuters
Researchers using a method to trigger the body's immune response have prevented and cured a type of malignant brain tumor in rats that kills its human victims within a year, an article published today in Science magazine says. Although the research has been limited to rats, scientists say it could have major implications for development of a cancer vaccine and for treatment of glioblastomas, the most frequent and deadly brain tumor in humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1990
A Los Angeles hospital has given UC Irvine a $208,000 grant for research into the use of the body's immune system to combat brain cancer. The grant from the Hospital of the Good Samaritan in Los Angeles to UCI's Cancer Research Institute will support basic studies by Gale Granger, a professor of molecular biology and biochemistry. Granger's approach to the battle against brain cancer is threefold.
SPORTS
March 22, 1990 | Associated Press
Fred Lebow, director of the New York City Marathon and president of the New York Road Runners Club, has brain cancer, the NYRRC said Wednesday. "Tests indicated that it is a lymphoma of the brain, which can be treated with radiation," the club said in a news release. "The radiation therapy will begin immediately." Lebow, 52, was admitted to Mount Sinai Medical Center Feb. 14 and stayed for three weeks.
SPORTS
June 28, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON
Former Raider Lyle Alzado, who has inoperable brain cancer, believes his condition was caused by steroids he took in his unsuccessful comeback attempt with the Raiders last summer. In an excerpt of an interview NBC will air Saturday night, Alzado, who retired from the Raiders in 1985, said that he took steroids most of his 14-year career, during which he also played for the Denver Broncos and Cleveland Browns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1991 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Raiders star Lyle Alzado is being treated for brain cancer and is so unsteady that he could not have attacked the process server who reported that he assaulted her this week, his lawyer and doctor said in prepared statements Friday. Alzado, 42, has primary brain lymphoma and is being treated with oral cortisone preparations and daily radiation therapy, Dr. Robert Huizenga said. "Mr.
SPORTS
May 27, 1998 | From Staff, Wire Reports
Former professional tennis player Todd Witsken, 34, a three-time All-American at USC, died of brain cancer Monday in Zionsville, Ind., 21 months after surgery to remove a malignant tumor from his brain. Witsken, who won more than $1.4 million on the ATP tour, broke onto the national scene in 1986 when he upset Jimmy Connors in the third round of the U.S. Open.
HEALTH
June 29, 1998 | RICHARD PITTMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Richard Pittman, who lives in Huntington Beach, has survived for three years with a grade III astrocytoma tumor as well as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy
It's like being sucker-punched--I didn't see it coming. I'm knocked off my feet, out of breath. I grope for the ropes, struggling to stay focused. Far off, bells are ringing with a garbled sound, as if my head is in a bubble. Now it's quiet. Though there is silence in the room, I hear in my mind's ear that famous Apollo 13 voice crackling over a radio with the understatement of the century: "Houston, we have a problem." I am staring at pictures of my head taken the night before.
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