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Brain Cancer

HEALTH
June 1, 2011 | By Shari Roan and Ellen Gabler, Los Angeles Times
Cellphone users may be at increased risk for two types of rare tumors and should try to reduce their exposure to the energy emitted by the phones, according to a panel of 31 international scientists convened by an agency within the World Health Organization. Studies so far do not show definitively that cellphone use increases that risk, said the authors of the consensus statement issued Tuesday by the WHO. But "limited" scientific evidence exists, they said, to suggest that the radiofrequency energy released by cellphones may increase the risk of glioma, a type of brain cancer, and acoustic neuroma, a noncancerous tumor of the nerve that runs from the ear to the brain.
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SPORTS
December 1, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Fred Lebow, who ran the 1992 New York City Marathon less than two years after being diagnosed with brain cancer, was hospitalized with a hernia and a scrotum ailment and will have surgery today.
HEALTH
June 16, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When cancer spreads to the brain from its original site, such as the lung or breast, it becomes extremely difficult to treat. The organ's natural barriers tend to block chemotherapy from entering, so that cancer cells survive in the brain even as they are killed off elsewhere. A possible weapon against this form of the disease, known as metastatic brain cancer, is a therapy currently used for primary brain cancer (in which the tumor originates in the brain).
SCIENCE
June 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
As few as two CT scans of the head in childhood can triple the risk of developing brain tumors, while five to 10 such scans can triple the risk of leukemia, British researchers reported Wednesday. The absolute risk of developing the cancers remains small, but the study illuminates the dangers of unnecessary use of X-ray imaging in diagnosis. The development of CT (computed tomography) scanning was one of the major developments of 20th century medicine because it allowed physicians to look inside the body more accurately than a conventional X-ray.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A teenager with brain cancer whose desire to shoot a bear created an uproar among animal rights activists has killed a brown bear in Alaska, it was reported. Erik Ness, 18, killed the almost 700-pound, 7-foot, 9-inch-tall animal near the Situk River during an unpublicized trip last month paid for by the Minnesota chapter of Safari Club International, a club for hunters.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
The first-ever study comparing brain cancer incidence in kids who use cellphones with those who do not has found no difference, suggesting that children's long-feared vulnerability to brain cancer with early cellphone use does not exist. In a four-country study published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers matched 352 children and adolescents diagnosed with brain cancer with 646 similar kids who were healthy, and compared their patterns of cellphone use. The children ranged in age from 7 to 19, and researchers asked how long they had been regular users of mobile phones, which ear they tended to favor, and whether they ever used a hands-free device.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | Associated Press
Archbishop John L. May, 70, has retired as a result of his battle since the summer with brain cancer, church officials said. The Most Reverend Edward J. O'Donnell, 61, a senior auxiliary bishop since 1984, was elected administrator Friday to govern until a new archbishop is named by Pope John Paul II. The process is expected to take six to eight months.
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