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Brain Damage

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988 | Associated Press
A jury has awarded $10 million to a northern Virginia child who suffered irreversible brain damage during birth. The jury made the decision Friday after hearing testimony that three doctors named in the case did not act quickly in December, 1984.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new study has cast doubt on the effectiveness of fetal monitors in preventing brain damage during childbirth, demonstrating that 99.8% of all signs of such injuries turn out to be false alarms. Electronic fetal monitoring is routine in hospital delivery rooms. Some critics contend that monitoring often leads doctors to perform unnecessary caesarean sections.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE and LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writers
Three toddlers who fell into a north Tustin pool while under the care of a baby sitter are expected to survive but will suffer severe brain damage for the rest of their lives, doctors said today. The children, all under 2 years old, are attached to life-support systems but their conditions have stabilized. "I think they will all live," said Dr. Stephen Johnson, director of the pediatrics intensive care unit at Western Medical Center in Santa Ana, "but they will live with severe brain damage."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Compton jury has awarded more than $8 million to the family of a boy who suffered brain damage during birth at a Monterey Park hospital. After a three-week trial, jurors this week found Dr. Nicolai Foong, a Monterey Park obstetrician, liable for the injuries suffered by Kevin Hsieh during his Oct. 2, 1997, delivery at Garfield Medical Center, the family's attorney said. "If Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Brain damage that occurs during certain heart surgeries may be reduced by stopping a natural chemical from overstimulating brain nerve cells to the point of cell suicide, a Johns Hopkins University study suggests. The researchers performed bypass surgery on laboratory animals to learn what triggers brain cell death and how to combat it. Half of the animals in the study received a drug called MK-801 to try to stop a neurotransmitter called glutamate from triggering the cell death process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1995 | DWAYNE BRAY
Convicted Thousand Oaks killer Mark Scott Thornton suffered a "precipitous" slowdown in weight gain during the first six months of his life, a defense expert testified Thursday, saying it possibly led to brain damage. Ventura pediatrician Robert Fostakowsky said medical records show that Thornton weighed eight pounds, five ounces at birth but had grown to only 13 pounds, 14 ounces six months later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000
Brandon Zucker, the 4 1/2-year-old boy injured last month at Disneyland, suffered brain damage and will most likely be moved to a long-term care facility, hospital officials said Thursday. The boy from Canyon Country in northern Los Angeles County remains in a coma at UCI Medical Center in Orange after the Sept. 22 accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2009 | Victoria Kim
A jury on Friday awarded $7.4 million to a child who suffered severe brain damage as an infant after doctors at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center failed to promptly treat an infection. Attorneys for Paris Campen, who was a little more than a month old at the time of the incident, argued that doctors at the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit were negligent when they did not administer an antibiotic to the newborn until eight hours after she began showing symptoms that indicated an infection.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | United Press International
CAT scans on Siamese twins separated 11 days ago show no brain damage, and the 7-month-old boys opened their eyes at their mother's touch, a hospital official said Thursday. Patrick and Benjamin Binder were born joined at the backs of their heads. They had separate brains but shared some skull bone and a major artery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1988 | LEONARD KLADY
One hesitates to say it, but it would take some type of demented genius to surpass "Brain Damage" (citywide) as the cinematic stomach-turner of 1988. Before anyone accepts this as a challenge, he or she should understand that this tale is conceived as both a horror film about death and as the darkest of black comedies. The film makers juggle so many balls in the air that it's a wonder any remain aloft. The story is about addiction, promiscuity, power and commerce.
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