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NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Mediterranean diet has been linked to a host of health benefits, including a lower risk of heart disease , cancer and diabetes . A study finds that the diet may also be associated with a decreased chance of small vessel damage in the brain. The diet , popular in Mediterranean countries, includes little red meat but lots of fresh vegetables and fruit, lean proteins, whole grains and healthy monosaturated fats from olive oil and nuts. In the study, released Monday in the Archives of Neurology , researchers analyzed diet information on 966 people, average age 72, who answered a food questionnaire to see how close they came to consuming a Mediterranean diet.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
Traveling keeps you young. Or at least healthier. That's the finding of a new study linking travel to decreased risks of heart attack and depression and even the promotion of brain health.  The Global Commission on Aging and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, in partnership with the U.S. Travel Assn., has released research that shows travel offers the same sort of physical and cognitive benefits as crossword puzzles or museum visits....
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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
Traveling keeps you young. Or at least healthier. That's the finding of a new study linking travel to decreased risks of heart attack and depression and even the promotion of brain health.  The Global Commission on Aging and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, in partnership with the U.S. Travel Assn., has released research that shows travel offers the same sort of physical and cognitive benefits as crossword puzzles or museum visits....
SCIENCE
November 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Attention pregnant women: If you want to help your child get into Harvard, lace up those sneakers and exercise! Hardly a week goes by without science delivering new evidence that exercise boosts the brain. Studies have linked exercise to brain health in senior citizens , middle-aged adults and kids . A trio of researchers from the University of Montreal figured the same might hold true for babies in utero as well. Dave Ellemberg and Daniel Curnier, two professors from the university's Department of Kinesiology, and graduate student Elise Labonte-LeMoyne recruited women who were in their first trimester of pregnancy and randomly assigned them to an “active” or “sedentary” group.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Older chocoholics may have a new excuse to indulge their cravings: The dark stuff not only soothes the soul, but might also sharpen the mind.  In a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, researchers reported that chocolate may help improve brain health and thinking skills in the elderly . The Boston-based team found that older people who initially performed poorly on a memory and reasoning test and also had reduced blood flow...
SPORTS
July 16, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
A prestigious neurology clinic has launched an unprecedented brain study of professional fighters with the goal of advancing research to improve various treatments for brain damage. "We know what permanent brain damage looks like in its final stages, but we know so little about what causes it and what happens during cumulative trauma," said Maureen Peckman of the Cleveland Clinic. Peckman is coordinating the new study between the clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas and officials with the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
If you have one of those kids who always has a nose buried in a book, here's a reason to be happy: Scientists  say activities at any age that stimulate the brain may help preserve brain power into old age. The scientists assessed 294 people from the Chicago area who were ages 55 and older, using annual tests to measure thinking and memory and questionnaires about past reading, writing and other mentally stimulating activities. At death, which occurred at an average age of just over 89, they looked at their brains for signs of dementia.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Two-thirds of patients sick enough to land in a hospital intensive care unit come away from the experience with substantial mental deficits, a new study has found. The new research, which quantifies a phenomenon long observed by critical-care physicians, found that three months after leaving the hospital, 4 in 10 patients continue to have cognitive problems on a par with those seen in cases of moderate traumatic brain injury. And more than a quarter experience a decline in mental function akin to that seen in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, the study says.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Retired football players who are overweight could be at greater risk for cognitive problems compared to normal-weight former players, a study finds. Football players might have the health deck stacked against them in other ways, since they're also at risk for brain injury from concussions. Add obesity into the mix and it may up the ante even more. Other studies have shown a link between obesity and cognitive impairment. Researchers analyzed data in two groups: 38 retired NFL players who were at a healthy weight and 38 retired players who were overweight.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Walking promotes good physical health, but it may also help maintain memory and cognitive function for years, a study finds. The research, published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology , is based on a study of 299 men and women, average age 78, who were followed for nine years. The study participants were asked about their physical activity, which was calculated as number of blocks walked per week (walking was the most common exercise). Study subjects walked from zero to 300 blocks over a one-week period.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Two-thirds of patients sick enough to land in a hospital intensive care unit come away from the experience with substantial mental deficits, a new study has found. The new research, which quantifies a phenomenon long observed by critical-care physicians, found that three months after leaving the hospital, 4 in 10 patients continue to have cognitive problems on a par with those seen in cases of moderate traumatic brain injury. And more than a quarter experience a decline in mental function akin to that seen in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, the study says.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Older chocoholics may have a new excuse to indulge their cravings: The dark stuff not only soothes the soul, but might also sharpen the mind.  In a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, researchers reported that chocolate may help improve brain health and thinking skills in the elderly . The Boston-based team found that older people who initially performed poorly on a memory and reasoning test and also had reduced blood flow...
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
If you have one of those kids who always has a nose buried in a book, here's a reason to be happy: Scientists  say activities at any age that stimulate the brain may help preserve brain power into old age. The scientists assessed 294 people from the Chicago area who were ages 55 and older, using annual tests to measure thinking and memory and questionnaires about past reading, writing and other mentally stimulating activities. At death, which occurred at an average age of just over 89, they looked at their brains for signs of dementia.
HEALTH
June 1, 2013 | By Lily Dayton
In decades past, if someone mentioned the word "fitness," he or she was probably talking about calisthenic routines performed in a spandex body suit. Today, the term "fitness" is as likely to encompass the body as it is the mind. More than simply memory, "brain fitness" refers to a diverse suite of cognitive functions, including attention, working memory, perception, decision-making and emotional regulation, says Dr. Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at UC San Francisco. "The field of brain fitness is built on the underlying concept of brain plasticity - the idea that the brain can modify or shape itself," he says.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Mediterranean diet has been linked to a host of health benefits, including a lower risk of heart disease , cancer and diabetes . A study finds that the diet may also be associated with a decreased chance of small vessel damage in the brain. The diet , popular in Mediterranean countries, includes little red meat but lots of fresh vegetables and fruit, lean proteins, whole grains and healthy monosaturated fats from olive oil and nuts. In the study, released Monday in the Archives of Neurology , researchers analyzed diet information on 966 people, average age 72, who answered a food questionnaire to see how close they came to consuming a Mediterranean diet.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Retired football players who are overweight could be at greater risk for cognitive problems compared to normal-weight former players, a study finds. Football players might have the health deck stacked against them in other ways, since they're also at risk for brain injury from concussions. Add obesity into the mix and it may up the ante even more. Other studies have shown a link between obesity and cognitive impairment. Researchers analyzed data in two groups: 38 retired NFL players who were at a healthy weight and 38 retired players who were overweight.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The brain of former National Hockey League player Derek Boogaard showed signs of early chronic traumatic encephalopathy, researchers report, shedding light on the neurological condition that may affect some athletes who sustain brain injuries during play. Boogaard died at age 28 from a drug overdose in May, and his brain was autopsied by Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist at the Bedford VA Medical Center and co-director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University.
OPINION
December 5, 2007 | Daniel G. Amen, Daniel G. Amen, a neuropsychiatrist and director of the Amen Clinics, is the author of "Change Your Brain, Change Your Life."
What do Rudy Giuliani's messy personal life, John McCain's temper and Hillary Clinton's inability to seem authentic have in common? Maybe nothing. They may be just overblown issues in the otherwise normal lives of candidates under the political microscope. Such symptoms, however, may mean a lot -- such as evidence of underlying brain dysfunction.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The brain of former National Hockey League player Derek Boogaard showed signs of early chronic traumatic encephalopathy, researchers report, shedding light on the neurological condition that may affect some athletes who sustain brain injuries during play. Boogaard died at age 28 from a drug overdose in May, and his brain was autopsied by Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist at the Bedford VA Medical Center and co-director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University.
SPORTS
July 16, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
A prestigious neurology clinic has launched an unprecedented brain study of professional fighters with the goal of advancing research to improve various treatments for brain damage. "We know what permanent brain damage looks like in its final stages, but we know so little about what causes it and what happens during cumulative trauma," said Maureen Peckman of the Cleveland Clinic. Peckman is coordinating the new study between the clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas and officials with the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
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