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NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Walking may put the brakes on cognitive decline in healthy older people as well as those with cognitive impairment, a new study finds. The ongoing study, which spans 20 years, also quantified how much walking is necessary to keep brain volume up. Researchers followed 426 older adults for a number of years to see if there were changes in brain volume. Among the participants 299 were healthy, and 127 had cognitive impairments, including 83 with mild cognitive impairment, and 44 with Alzheimer's disease.
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NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Jay Jones
They were born within minutes of each other nearly 80 years ago, and on April 13, jazz great Quincy Jones and British actor Michael Caine will celebrate their birthdays together at a star-studded party at the MGM Grand resort. The Power of Love Gala is a fundraiser for the Las Vegas -based Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health . Tickets start at $1,500 a person, but the price includes an evening's worth of activities, beginning with a dinner prepared by celebrity chefs Wolfgang Puck and Gordon Ramsay.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Jay Jones
Ailing chef Kerry Simon is hoping he may have good news to share about his health when fellow celebrity chefs and his rock star friends gather for a fundraiser on Feb. 27. The $1,000-a-person cocktail party in Las Vegas is intended to raise awareness of multiple symptom atrophy (MSA), the rare, fatal disorder that Simon was diagnosed with last October. As with Parkinson's disease, the illness attacks nerve cells, causing various body functions to fail.  “I call it Parkinson's on speed,” the restaurateur told me. “Parkinson's you can live with for a long period of time.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Running or swimming could help slow some of the damage done to the brain by alcohol, researchers found. Aerobic exercise was associated with less damage to specific parts of the brain's white matter, though the researchers could not say how much exercise would balance a night on the town. They reported their findings in an online preview of publication in September's journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. No surprise here, but the researchers also found the flip side to be the case: Heavy drinking combined with a sedentary life posed risks to brain health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
One-year-old Nelly Gomez refused to eat. Anything she swallowed, she immediately threw up. Thinking Nelly had indigestion, her parents took her to a nearby clinic in MacArthur Park. A blood test revealed a diagnosis that surprised and worried them: lead poisoning. "I didn't know what was going to happen," said her father, Nelson Gomez, an unemployed construction worker. "As her dad, I felt desperate. " Despite enormous strides over the last 20 years in protecting children from lead, which can cause irreversible nerve and brain damage, health workers still find unsafe levels in thousands of California youths every year.
HEALTH
November 8, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Forgot where you left your keys? The name of your neighbor's kid? Whether you locked the car? Anyone looking for an easy way to boost brain power is likely to come across an increasingly common piece of advice: Up your intake of B vitamins. The vitamins ? including folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 ? are often touted as a way to improve memory and stave off cognitive decline. The claims are based on the finding that levels of the vitamin are low in people with various forms of cognitive impairment, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer winds down, another new school year brings fresh notebooks, sharp pencils and — for many kids — a new cycle of sleep deprivation. With classes that start as early as 7 a.m. and buses that pull up long before sunrise, some 80% of American kids in grades 6 through 12 are falling short of sleep recommendations during the school year, according to research by the National Sleep Foundation, a sleep advocacy group. Overtired kids, studies suggest, struggle with depression.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Omega-3 fatty-acid supplements, often called fish-oil capsules, did not curb the mental decline in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, researchers said Tuesday. The study marks yet another attempt to treat the disease that has failed in clinical trials. Treatment with omega-3 supplements had generated considerable enthusiasm because, unlike the other unsuccessful experimental therapies, it was a natural therapy and would not have required development of a new prescription drug.
HEALTH
June 14, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Training a child to hold a whole cluster of items in his or her memory for even a short time may feel like trying to hold a wave on the sand. But a study published Monday says it's a drill that can yield lasting benefits. Children who've had such training have better abstract reasoning and solve problems more creatively than kids who haven't, the study found. But here's a warning to parents already grooming their young children for entry into elite universities: Don't automatically rush out to enroll your young genius in brain-training summer camp or invest in DVDs promising to deliver high IQs. These drills, the scientists found, pay the greatest dividends for children who actually need them and who find the escalating challenge of the games fun, not frustrating.
HEALTH
April 6, 2009 | Karen Ravn
Maybe you chew your fingernails when you're nervous. Or scarf down chocolate when you're sad. Or take home a stray kitty whenever you see one, until the SPCA has to come rescue them all and have you arrested for being a hoarder. Chances are, you have a few habits you wish you didn't have, and quite possibly you've tried (and tried and tried) to break them. Scientists are learning why you may have failed (and failed and failed).
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