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Brain Injury

NEWS
December 31, 1994 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karine Pire cooks lunch in the apartment she shares with her mother, following elaborate lists tacked up all over the kitchen: open oven . . . put breaded filets in . . . close oven. She has rolled the linens into shiny sunflower napkin rings, smoothed down the place mat corners and, after squinting at a diagram of the cabinet contents, found the dishes. Over lunch, Pire talks about why she does not often dream, why she cannot smell the strong Belgian coffee brewing four feet away.
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HEALTH
May 5, 2012 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Montel Williams is not your typical pot-smoking snowboarder. Best known as an Emmy-winning talk show host, the former Marine and decorated naval intelligence officer was also a champion boxer, bodybuilder and power-lifter. In 1999, Williams was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and it hit him hard. After a downward slide to rock bottom, Williams decided to get his life back. Were you active in your younger years? I was extremely active. I was a martial artist. I played every sport: track, football, basketball.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Michael Butcher has applied for at least 25 jobs since injuries he suffered in Iraq forced him to leave the Army three years ago. "I was even turned down by McDonald's," said the 29-year-old San Diego native. The military is known for developing leadership, adaptability, loyalty and teamwork. But Butcher said when he tells employers he needs time off to see therapists for post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury, they don't call back. "They think you are mental," he said.
SPORTS
March 3, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Glendale, Ariz. — "I look completely normal, right?" a completely normal-looking Taylor Twellman says. It's something he asks often, and the response is always the same: nodding heads, words of affirmation, smiles. In reality, though, Twellman is far from normal. Three and a half years ago, the then-New England Revolution forward and former Major League Soccer most valuable player was accidentally punched in the jaw by Galaxy goalkeeper Steve Cronin while scoring on a header.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
During the pregame show before February's Super Bowl in New Orleans, Deion Sanders shared his thoughts about the thousands of former football players filing concussion lawsuits against the National Football League. "The game is a safe game," the television analyst and Hall of Fame cornerback said. "I don't buy all these guys coming back with these concussions. I'm not buying all that. Half these guys are trying to make money off the deal. " What Sanders didn't say was that more than two years earlier he had filed a workers' compensation claim in California, alleging head trauma and other injuries incurred while playing for the Dallas Cowboys.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Even a single concussion appears to cause changes in the structure of the brain that may make cognitive problems and depression a higher likelihood, a new study has found. The study, which used magnetic resonance imaging to compare healthy subjects' brains with those of patients a year after a mild traumatic brain injury, indicated that those with such injuries had shrinkage in brain regions that are key to memory, executive function and mood regulation. The study, published online in the journal Radiology on Tuesday, is the first to show that even a single concussion can leave measurable scars on the brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When a movie calls itself "The Vow," you know it takes its love and its relationships seriously. And that's certainly the case with the new romantically and medically challenged weepie starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum. Despite the sweet story -- lovely couple, car wreck, brain injury, she forgets him, he loves her anyway -- and the beautiful scenery -- cool converted warehouse spaces, snowy Chicago streets, Lake Michigan in the moonlight, and of course Tatum and McAdams -- this is a movie that leaves you wanting more.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Albert Einstein had a colossal corpus callosum. And when it comes to this particular piece of neural real estate, it's pretty clear that size matters. Chances are, that brawny bundle of white matter cleaving the Swiss physicist's brain from front to back is part of what made his mind so phenomenally creative. The corpus callosum carries electrical signals between the brain's right hemisphere and its left. Stretching nearly the full length of the brain from behind the forehead to the nape of the neck, the corpus callosum is the dense network of neural fibers that make brain regions with very different functions work together.
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