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Brain Injury

July 9, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have used a simple training program to break through what was believed to be a fundamental limitation of the human brain - the ability to perceive two items when they are presented in rapid succession, less than half a second apart. The findings suggest new treatments for those with attentional deficits following a brain injury or during the progression of a neurodegenerative disease. They could also lead to a way for people with normal attention to perceive the world better.
September 19, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Michael Butcher has applied for at least 25 jobs since injuries he suffered in Iraq forced him to leave the Army three years ago. "I was even turned down by McDonald's," said the 29-year-old San Diego native. The military is known for developing leadership, adaptability, loyalty and teamwork. But Butcher said when he tells employers he needs time off to see therapists for post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury, they don't call back. "They think you are mental," he said.
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In the wake of a traumatic brain injury, a victim may have more to worry about than lingering headaches, dizziness or inability to concentrate: A new study finds that the risk of ischemic stroke -- in which blood flow to the brain is blocked or reduced -- rises in the years that follow. That finding, published this week in the journal Neurology, may help explain the incidence of stroke in patients under 65 and in patients without some of stroke's known risk factors, such as hypertension, Type 2 diabetes or atrial fibrillation.
March 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Even a single concussion appears to cause changes in the structure of the brain that may make cognitive problems and depression a higher likelihood, a new study has found. The study, which used magnetic resonance imaging to compare healthy subjects' brains with those of patients a year after a mild traumatic brain injury, indicated that those with such injuries had shrinkage in brain regions that are key to memory, executive function and mood regulation. The study, published online in the journal Radiology on Tuesday, is the first to show that even a single concussion can leave measurable scars on the brain.
June 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research from Canada has found that roughly 1 in 5  adolescents has probably suffered a traumatic brain injury--a figure that suggests severe concussion among children and adolescents may be far more common than has been estimated. The new study also hints at a troubling link between a history of traumatic brain injury and poorer grades, underage drinking and use of illicit drugs. In Ontario, Canada, 62% of students in grades seven through 12  anonymously completed a computerized questionnaire administered during the school day, which gauged their drug and alcohol consumption patterns and a wide range of health-related behaviors.
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