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Brain Injury

SPORTS
January 13, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Danny Davis wasn't alone on his history-making halfpipe run here the other day, his journey on the board bolstered by the vibe of a close friend, almost riding shotgun. Nor was Hannah Teter truly running solo when she steeled to take on the icy pipe, preparing to drop in and chase a spot at the Olympics in Vancouver next month. Kevin Pearce wasn't in Mammoth. But the severely injured and hospitalized snowboarder has found a safe place, deep in the hearts and minds of his friends and colleagues in the tight snowboarding community.
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NEWS
December 31, 1994 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karine Pire cooks lunch in the apartment she shares with her mother, following elaborate lists tacked up all over the kitchen: open oven . . . put breaded filets in . . . close oven. She has rolled the linens into shiny sunflower napkin rings, smoothed down the place mat corners and, after squinting at a diagram of the cabinet contents, found the dishes. Over lunch, Pire talks about why she does not often dream, why she cannot smell the strong Belgian coffee brewing four feet away.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
A screening test for concussion that can be performed quickly on the sidelines was able to detect mild traumatic brain injury in about 4 in 5 college athletes who had sustained a concussion, a forthcoming study has found. The King-Devick test capitalizes on a subtle but important symptom of brain injury: a disruption in the eyes' ability to travel smoothly across a page, and to shift direction upon the brain's command. In a new study conducted on male and female athletes at the University of Florida, most subjects who took the King-Devick test soon after suffering a concussion showed reductions in speed and accuracy that were marked enough to reveal mild traumatic brain injury.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Albert Einstein had a colossal corpus callosum. And when it comes to this particular piece of neural real estate, it's pretty clear that size matters. Chances are, that brawny bundle of white matter cleaving the Swiss physicist's brain from front to back is part of what made his mind so phenomenally creative. The corpus callosum carries electrical signals between the brain's right hemisphere and its left. Stretching nearly the full length of the brain from behind the forehead to the nape of the neck, the corpus callosum is the dense network of neural fibers that make brain regions with very different functions work together.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When a movie calls itself "The Vow," you know it takes its love and its relationships seriously. And that's certainly the case with the new romantically and medically challenged weepie starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum. Despite the sweet story -- lovely couple, car wreck, brain injury, she forgets him, he loves her anyway -- and the beautiful scenery -- cool converted warehouse spaces, snowy Chicago streets, Lake Michigan in the moonlight, and of course Tatum and McAdams -- this is a movie that leaves you wanting more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
SCIENCE
June 11, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Heading the ball is a key soccer skill, but a new study finds that players who headed the ball frequently were more likely to suffer brain injury and damage their memory than their fellow players who were a little less headstrong, so to speak.   While sports like football (the American variety) and ice hockey garner most of the attention when it comes to concussions and other forms of traumatic brain injury (TBI), soccer is an intense physical sport for which the head can be as important as the foot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - From the rooftop where he was filming a scene for his art heist film "Trance" in September 2011, British director Danny Boyle surveyed the construction cranes stretching across the east London skyline, finishing work for the capital's upcoming Summer Olympics. Boyle, perhaps best known as the man behind the Oscar-winning "Slumdog Millionaire," pointed out the neighborhood where athletes would stay, the sites of new sports facilities and the location of the opening ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Michael Butcher has applied for at least 25 jobs since injuries he suffered in Iraq forced him to leave the Army three years ago. "I was even turned down by McDonald's," said the 29-year-old San Diego native. The military is known for developing leadership, adaptability, loyalty and teamwork. But Butcher said when he tells employers he needs time off to see therapists for post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury, they don't call back. "They think you are mental," he said.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Even a single concussion appears to cause changes in the structure of the brain that may make cognitive problems and depression a higher likelihood, a new study has found. The study, which used magnetic resonance imaging to compare healthy subjects' brains with those of patients a year after a mild traumatic brain injury, indicated that those with such injuries had shrinkage in brain regions that are key to memory, executive function and mood regulation. The study, published online in the journal Radiology on Tuesday, is the first to show that even a single concussion can leave measurable scars on the brain.
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