Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBrain Injury
IN THE NEWS

Brain Injury

NEWS
December 31, 1994 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karine Pire cooks lunch in the apartment she shares with her mother, following elaborate lists tacked up all over the kitchen: open oven . . . put breaded filets in . . . close oven. She has rolled the linens into shiny sunflower napkin rings, smoothed down the place mat corners and, after squinting at a diagram of the cabinet contents, found the dishes. Over lunch, Pire talks about why she does not often dream, why she cannot smell the strong Belgian coffee brewing four feet away.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Michael Butcher has applied for at least 25 jobs since injuries he suffered in Iraq forced him to leave the Army three years ago. "I was even turned down by McDonald's," said the 29-year-old San Diego native. The military is known for developing leadership, adaptability, loyalty and teamwork. But Butcher said when he tells employers he needs time off to see therapists for post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury, they don't call back. "They think you are mental," he said.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In the 1946 issue of the Annals of Surgery, U.S. Army Maj. Ralph A. Munslow chronicled in exquisite detail the emergency care of 140 soldiers and civilians who suffered grievous head wounds ? mainly from shell fragments ? during the 5th Army's 1944 operation to seize and hold a beachhead in Anzio, Italy. While liberally sprinkling antibiotic sulfa powder, and later penicillin, directly into his patients' gaping head wounds, Munslow meticulously collected all traces of foreign bodies and skull fragments, he reported.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have used a simple training program to break through what was believed to be a fundamental limitation of the human brain - the ability to perceive two items when they are presented in rapid succession, less than half a second apart. The findings suggest new treatments for those with attentional deficits following a brain injury or during the progression of a neurodegenerative disease. They could also lead to a way for people with normal attention to perceive the world better.
SCIENCE
June 11, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Heading the ball is a key soccer skill, but a new study finds that players who headed the ball frequently were more likely to suffer brain injury and damage their memory than their fellow players who were a little less headstrong, so to speak.   While sports like football (the American variety) and ice hockey garner most of the attention when it comes to concussions and other forms of traumatic brain injury (TBI), soccer is an intense physical sport for which the head can be as important as the foot.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In the wake of a traumatic brain injury, a victim may have more to worry about than lingering headaches, dizziness or inability to concentrate: A new study finds that the risk of ischemic stroke -- in which blood flow to the brain is blocked or reduced -- rises in the years that follow. That finding, published this week in the journal Neurology, may help explain the incidence of stroke in patients under 65 and in patients without some of stroke's known risk factors, such as hypertension, Type 2 diabetes or atrial fibrillation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|