Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBrain Injury
IN THE NEWS

Brain Injury

HEALTH
May 5, 2012 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Montel Williams is not your typical pot-smoking snowboarder. Best known as an Emmy-winning talk show host, the former Marine and decorated naval intelligence officer was also a champion boxer, bodybuilder and power-lifter. In 1999, Williams was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and it hit him hard. After a downward slide to rock bottom, Williams decided to get his life back. Were you active in your younger years? I was extremely active. I was a martial artist. I played every sport: track, football, basketball.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Albert Einstein had a colossal corpus callosum. And when it comes to this particular piece of neural real estate, it's pretty clear that size matters. Chances are, that brawny bundle of white matter cleaving the Swiss physicist's brain from front to back is part of what made his mind so phenomenally creative. The corpus callosum carries electrical signals between the brain's right hemisphere and its left. Stretching nearly the full length of the brain from behind the forehead to the nape of the neck, the corpus callosum is the dense network of neural fibers that make brain regions with very different functions work together.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In the wake of a traumatic brain injury, a victim may have more to worry about than lingering headaches, dizziness or inability to concentrate: A new study finds that the risk of ischemic stroke -- in which blood flow to the brain is blocked or reduced -- rises in the years that follow. That finding, published this week in the journal Neurology, may help explain the incidence of stroke in patients under 65 and in patients without some of stroke's known risk factors, such as hypertension, Type 2 diabetes or atrial fibrillation.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
A screening test for concussion that can be performed quickly on the sidelines was able to detect mild traumatic brain injury in about 4 in 5 college athletes who had sustained a concussion, a forthcoming study has found. The King-Devick test capitalizes on a subtle but important symptom of brain injury: a disruption in the eyes' ability to travel smoothly across a page, and to shift direction upon the brain's command. In a new study conducted on male and female athletes at the University of Florida, most subjects who took the King-Devick test soon after suffering a concussion showed reductions in speed and accuracy that were marked enough to reveal mild traumatic brain injury.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research from Canada has found that roughly 1 in 5  adolescents has probably suffered a traumatic brain injury--a figure that suggests severe concussion among children and adolescents may be far more common than has been estimated. The new study also hints at a troubling link between a history of traumatic brain injury and poorer grades, underage drinking and use of illicit drugs. In Ontario, Canada, 62% of students in grades seven through 12  anonymously completed a computerized questionnaire administered during the school day, which gauged their drug and alcohol consumption patterns and a wide range of health-related behaviors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|