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Brain Injury

SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have used a simple training program to break through what was believed to be a fundamental limitation of the human brain - the ability to perceive two items when they are presented in rapid succession, less than half a second apart. The findings suggest new treatments for those with attentional deficits following a brain injury or during the progression of a neurodegenerative disease. They could also lead to a way for people with normal attention to perceive the world better.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Michael Butcher has applied for at least 25 jobs since injuries he suffered in Iraq forced him to leave the Army three years ago. "I was even turned down by McDonald's," said the 29-year-old San Diego native. The military is known for developing leadership, adaptability, loyalty and teamwork. But Butcher said when he tells employers he needs time off to see therapists for post-traumatic stress disorder and a brain injury, they don't call back. "They think you are mental," he said.
HEALTH
May 5, 2012 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Montel Williams is not your typical pot-smoking snowboarder. Best known as an Emmy-winning talk show host, the former Marine and decorated naval intelligence officer was also a champion boxer, bodybuilder and power-lifter. In 1999, Williams was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and it hit him hard. After a downward slide to rock bottom, Williams decided to get his life back. Were you active in your younger years? I was extremely active. I was a martial artist. I played every sport: track, football, basketball.
HEALTH
November 1, 1999 | FRANCES GRANDY TAYLOR, HARTFORD COURANT
Laura Gagliardi awoke from a coma on her 17th birthday, three months after she suffered traumatic brain injury in a car accident. It was an event her family and doctors had hoped for but did not expect. Gagliardi had arrived at the hospital unconscious and unresponsive. But rather than battling to keep the teenager out of a coma, Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When a movie calls itself "The Vow," you know it takes its love and its relationships seriously. And that's certainly the case with the new romantically and medically challenged weepie starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum. Despite the sweet story -- lovely couple, car wreck, brain injury, she forgets him, he loves her anyway -- and the beautiful scenery -- cool converted warehouse spaces, snowy Chicago streets, Lake Michigan in the moonlight, and of course Tatum and McAdams -- this is a movie that leaves you wanting more.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In the wake of a traumatic brain injury, a victim may have more to worry about than lingering headaches, dizziness or inability to concentrate: A new study finds that the risk of ischemic stroke -- in which blood flow to the brain is blocked or reduced -- rises in the years that follow. That finding, published this week in the journal Neurology, may help explain the incidence of stroke in patients under 65 and in patients without some of stroke's known risk factors, such as hypertension, Type 2 diabetes or atrial fibrillation.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A middle school in Port Washington, N.Y., has banned footballs, soccer balls, baseballs and lacrosse balls on its playgrounds. The students at Weber Middle School on Long Island also cannot roughhouse -- no jarring games of tag or cartwheels, unless supervised by a coach, reports the local CBS outlet. School officials said there'd been a rash of playground injuries. Nerf balls are OK. Woo-hoo. Those of us who grew up careening around without bike helmets, clambering over metal monkey bars with only concrete to break our falls and taking numerous dodgeballs to the kidneys may scoff.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research from Canada has found that roughly 1 in 5  adolescents has probably suffered a traumatic brain injury--a figure that suggests severe concussion among children and adolescents may be far more common than has been estimated. The new study also hints at a troubling link between a history of traumatic brain injury and poorer grades, underage drinking and use of illicit drugs. In Ontario, Canada, 62% of students in grades seven through 12  anonymously completed a computerized questionnaire administered during the school day, which gauged their drug and alcohol consumption patterns and a wide range of health-related behaviors.
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