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Brain Research

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NEWS
May 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Space shuttle Columbia and its crew returned to Earth on Sunday, ending two weeks of lab work that advanced brain research despite unexpected animal casualties. And the experiments were far from over. Within an hour, the crew was hustled off to medical tests that were expected to go on for days. Six of the seven astronauts left on stretchers; doctors wanted them reclining to preserve elements of their weightless state.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
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NEWS
October 5, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that signals San Diego's maturation as a heavyweight in scientific circles, a prestigious New York City brain research center announced Friday that it will relocate here. The Neurosciences Institute, an independent center based at Rockefeller University, will move to the Scripps Research Institute, where a building will be constructed to house the team. Dr. Gerald Edelman, director of NSI, won the Nobel Prize in 1972 for his research on the chemical structure of antibody molecules.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
With homespun recipes from “Mitt's meatloaf cakes” to "banana trash pudding," Ann Romney's new cookbook, "The Romney Family Table," has been a brisk seller since its recent debut, topping Amazon's list as the bestselling hardcover cookbook. That is good news for the Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and the center's co-director, Dr. Howard L. Weiner, who has treated Romney since she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1998. After writing the cookbook this year, Romney announced that she would donate the proceeds to the center's research into the causes and treatment of neurological diseases -- including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
HEALTH
September 1, 2008 | Rosemary Clandos, Special to The Times
Raised IN poverty, Dr. Shauna Blake Collins fought fear during nearly 14 years of education. A dropout from a South-Central Los Angeles high school, she earned a GED diploma at 22, became a licensed vocational nurse, a registered nurse, and finally, at 41, a physician. Confidence came only during the last two years of medical school. "Every step of the way, I was petrified," says the Winnetka mother of two toddlers, who recently graduated from UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine.
BOOKS
April 13, 1986 | Jackson Beatty, Beatty is a professor of physiological psychology at UCLA and a member of its Brain Research Institute. His next book, "The Biological Basis of Behavior," will be published this summer by the Dorsey Press
Books about the brain are written for many purposes. Some are texts--often technical and foreboding--that educate new generations of students in the science of brain research. Others are intended for a more general audience, individuals who are simply interested in the workings of this most mysterious organ that gives each of us the essence of our humanness. Judith Hooper and Dick Teresi's "The Three-Pound Universe" and Michael Hutchinson's "Megabrain" are new books intended for the general reader; each is concerned with the relation between mind and brain, but in very different ways.
SCIENCE
April 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
President Obama's brain-mapping initiative, for which he has proposed $110 million in federal funding for 2014, will focus how on how the brain is affected by conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and autism; how it produces memories and programs human behavior; and what treatments could lead to cures for post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer's disease and other neuropsychiatric afflictions. The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative is modeled after the Human Genome Project of the 1990s and early 2000s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
The UCI College of Medicine tonight is holding a free public symposium on brain research, addressing topics from human intelligence to Alzheimer's disease. A dozen researchers who use imaging technology to peer into the brain at work will each give talks of about 10 minutes. Aimed at a nonscientist audience, the lectures are part of national Brain Awareness Week. A reception with the scientists, at which soft drinks will be served, follows the symposium. It is set for 7 to 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1991
For the last 10 years, Rep. Silvio Conte (obituary, Feb. 10) was a vigorous supporter of increased federal funding on neurological and mental disorders. These disorders devastate the lives of millions of Americans and cost the U.S. more than $3 billion a year. In his leadership position, Conte, year in and year out, led the efforts in Congress to increase our understanding of the brain and to cure devastating disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY
UC Irvine has received $3.7 million in grants and donations for research on oral cancer and brain research equipment, a university spokesman said. A five-year grant for $2.7 million from the National Cancer Institute will go to the Chao Family Clinical Cancer Research Center for a clinical trial to evaluate a new treatment for the prevention of oral cancer.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Scientists have figured out how to grow human stem cells into "cerebral organoids" - blobs of tissue that mimic the anatomy of the developing brain. The advance, reported online Wednesday by the journal Nature, won't allow scientists to grow disembodied brains in laboratory vats, said study leader Juergen Knoblich, a stem cell researcher at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Science in Vienna. But it does offer researchers an unprecedented view of human brain anatomy, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a major case of academic poaching involving crosstown rivals, USC has lured away two prominent neuroscientists from UCLA with a promise to expand their internationally renowned lab that uses brain imaging techniques to study Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism and other disorders. Arthur Toga and Paul Thompson will move to the USC Keck School of Medicine campus next fall, along with scores of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and staffers who now work at UCLA's Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, known as LONI.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2013 | By David Horsey
President Obama wants to invest an initial $110 million in a study of the human brain that could have benefits as great as those achieved by the Human Genome Project. Maybe the first study should be done on the one-track minds of tea party Republicans, who will undoubtedly oppose funding for the study because their brains are fixated on the single idea that government can do nothing right. After that, researchers could move on to figuring out Sarah Palin's brain. Perhaps they could answer this question: How can a person with so little knowledge and so little interest in acquiring knowledge imagine that she has what it takes to be president of the United States?
SCIENCE
April 3, 2013 | Melissa Healy
Making good on a promise first hinted at during his State of the Union speech in February, President Obama on Tuesday unveiled the broad outlines of a scientific initiative aimed at mapping the human brain. The project's ambitious goals include understanding how the brain forms memories and controls behavior; how it becomes damaged by conditions such as Parkinson's disease and autism; and how it can be repaired when afflicted by Alzheimer's disease, post-traumatic stress disorder and other illnesses.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama is asking Congress to approve $110 million in new spending for research on the human brain, an investment he said would benefit not just science but the economy. “Ideas are what power our economy,” Obama said Tuesday in announcing the proposal. “When we invest in the best ideas before anybody else does, our businesses and our workers can make the best products and deliver the best services before anybody else.” The “BRAIN” initiative - for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies - would start with $110 million in the budget for fiscal year 2014 that Obama plans to unveil next week.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Cherry Gee
President Obama on Tuesday announced the "BRAIN Initiative" to map the human brain. "As humans we can identify galaxies light-years away, study particles smaller than an atom, but we still haven't unlocked the mystery of the 3 pounds of matter than sits between our ears," Obama said. Obama will propose $100 million in federal funding in his 2014 budget to kick-start the public-private project, whose formal title is "Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1992
In "Tuning Up Brains" (Jan. 20), I was incorrectly identified as one of Dr. (Gordon) Shaw's (brain research) group: " . . . said Shaw, who is working with fellow UCI scientists Norman Weinberger, a psychobiologist; Xiaodan Leng, a physicist, and musician Eric Wright of the Irvine Conservatory of Music." In so doing, you omitted the name of Dr. Leslie Brothers of the department of psychiatry at UCLA, who is a member of Dr. Shaw's group. My research is quite distinct from that of Dr. Shaw and his colleagues.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Cherry Gee
President Obama on Tuesday announced the "BRAIN Initiative" to map the human brain. "As humans we can identify galaxies light-years away, study particles smaller than an atom, but we still haven't unlocked the mystery of the 3 pounds of matter than sits between our ears," Obama said. Obama will propose $100 million in federal funding in his 2014 budget to kick-start the public-private project, whose formal title is "Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies.
SCIENCE
April 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
President Obama's brain-mapping initiative, for which he has proposed $110 million in federal funding for 2014, will focus how on how the brain is affected by conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and autism; how it produces memories and programs human behavior; and what treatments could lead to cures for post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer's disease and other neuropsychiatric afflictions. The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative is modeled after the Human Genome Project of the 1990s and early 2000s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011
Edward G. 'Ted' Jones Scientist studied brain anatomy, schizophrenia Dr. Edward G. "Ted" Jones, 72, a former UC Irvine neuroscientist who was an expert on brain anatomy and the causes of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, collapsed and died of a heart attack at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center on June 6 while attending a scientific conference. Jones retired in 2009 as director of the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience but remained a professor in the Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology.
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