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Brain Research

HEALTH
May 14, 2007 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
PROFESSIONAL boxing can be brutal on the brain. Repeated blows to the head can result in severe speech problems, tremors and loss of motor control, and has had devastating effects on boxers such as Muhammad Ali and Jerry Quarry. Amateur boxers are believed to be at considerably lower risk from dementia pugilistica, or punch-drunk syndrome, because they wear protective headgear, shock-absorbing gloves, and go fewer rounds.
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MAGAZINE
May 2, 2004 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael D'Antonio last wrote for the magazine about an Oregon town that honored a man who as a child had been warehoused in school for the retarded and was a subject in a government experiment.
What humans possess, jokes economist Colin Camerer, "is basically a monkey brain with a good publicist." That's his conclusion from observing the results of experiments by scientists at Caltech and elsewhere, who are peering into the human brain to see how we think--and finding they can predict the decisions their subjects will make. Scans made at an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) lab would typically be used to map an injury or diagnose disease.
SCIENCE
February 20, 2004 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Pain, like beauty, is in the mind's eye. It is altered by empathy and tempered by faith, three new brain-imaging studies suggest. The bewitching effect of belief can alter directly how strongly people feel pain, causing measurable changes in brain cells and synapses whether the torment is theirs or a loved one's.
HEALTH
July 14, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Despite fears to the contrary, recreational marijuana use apparently has little lasting effect on the brain. UC San Diego researchers came to this conclusion after analyzing the results of 15 studies comparing brain function in cannabis users and nonusers. The study included data on nearly 2,000 people, 704 of whom ranged from heavy users to those who smoked two to three times a week for a few years.
HEALTH
June 16, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When cancer spreads to the brain from its original site, such as the lung or breast, it becomes extremely difficult to treat. The organ's natural barriers tend to block chemotherapy from entering, so that cancer cells survive in the brain even as they are killed off elsewhere. A possible weapon against this form of the disease, known as metastatic brain cancer, is a therapy currently used for primary brain cancer (in which the tumor originates in the brain).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national research and advocacy group will launch the first in-depth study into the possible link between brain injuries and thrill rides in response to increasing concerns over roller-coaster safety since recent deaths at two California amusement parks. The Brain Injury Assn.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like a loose ball in a kids' game, argument over the safety of heading in soccer has parents, coaches and scientists scrambling all over. Some youth soccer leagues, reacting to research that indicated players could get concussions, are setting rules to restrict striking the ball with the head. Doctors who authored a new review of research respond that the technique is safe. But another expert stands by his contention that heading is too risky for the young.
HEALTH
April 2, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
In honor of National Medical History Awareness Week, this column is devoted to tales from labs of yesteryear. OK, OK, so there is no Medical History Awareness Week (that we know of). The column is devoted to medical history because I happened to drive to UCLA last week to learn about old experiments with brains. Louise H.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Confirming what many women have long suspected, new brain research released Tuesday shows that men give only half a mind to what they hear, listening with just one side of their brains while women use both. This latest insight into the oldest of humanity's differences--gender--doesn't say who is a better listener.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000
Did you know that the brain is not fully equipped at age 2, as previously believed, but continues to grow and develop throughout life? Scientists study the brain not only to understand how we learn and remember but also to provide clues to help doctors treat disease.
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