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SCIENCE
September 10, 2007 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Exploring the neurobiology of politics, scientists have found that liberals tolerate ambiguity and conflict better than conservatives because of how their brains work. In a simple experiment reported todayin the journal Nature Neuroscience, scientists at New York University and UCLA show that political orientation is related to differences in how the brain processes information. Previous psychological studies have found that conservatives tend to be more structured and persistent in their judgments whereas liberals are more open to new experiences.
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NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Irritable bowel syndrome has been a tough disorder to understand. Studies have failed to show any structural problems in the gut that would account for the symptoms of pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation. However, the disorder is real, affecting as many as 15% of Americans. A new study has found a possible connection between IBS and the brain. Researchers at McGill University and UCLA used MRI scans to reveal changes in the brains of women with the disorder. The researchers took MRI scans of 55 IBS patients and 48 healthy women for comparison.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered the fossilized brain of an animal that lived 520 million years ago. It is the oldest mostly intact nervous system to have ever been found. The incredible ancient brain and nervous system, described in the journal Nature, belongs to an Alacomenaeus , a member of the mega-claw family. These animals earned the name "mega-claw" ( megacheiran ), because they have two large scissor-like appendages that protrude from the top of their heads. Megacheirans lived in the early Cambrian-era ocean, swimming and scuttling around with nearly one dozen little legs, or swimmerettes.
HEALTH
February 16, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
Suppose you're under a lot of pressure. Does it feel like a huge flood is swirling around in your brain, tossing your thoughts every which way? Well, Ashley Merryman and Po Bronson say, maybe that's because your brain really is flooded - with dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that the brain needs to run at full capacity, but as with so many good things, it's possible to have too much of it. So, as your brain keeps producing fresh dopamine, it has to keep getting rid of the old. In the prefrontal cortex, special enzymes called COMT - for catechol-O-methyltransferase - carry out these mop-up operations.
OPINION
June 19, 2009 | Richard Farrell, Richard Farrell produced and directed the HBO documentary "High on Crack Street: Lost Lives in Lowell" and is the author of a forthcoming memoir, "What's Left of Us."
I killed my dad. I didn't blow him away with a gun. Instead, I let him die. I pulled a kitchen chair up next to him and watched him struggle to breathe on the floor. The skin on his face turned a reddish-purple. His neck took on a bluish tint. Both his hands clutched tightly at his chest. And suddenly, the white in his eyes became spider-web etched, in blood-red lines. Why did I do it? It's complicated. I loved the son of a bitch more than anything on the planet.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Leave it to science to find a way to harsh the mellow of marijuana. A French research team has discovered a natural chemical brake that can tamp down the effects of THC, the main intoxicant in marijuana. They believe it could lead to ways to protect against memory loss, torpor and other side-effects better known as being stoned. “We have this built-in negative feedback mechanism, a brake” on cannabis intoxication, said University of Bordeaux neurobiologist Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza, principal author of a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Let's get a couple of things straight first about estrogen, the so-called "female hormone. " First, it influences a lot more than just what's going on "down there": it's produced by the brain, of course, and brain scientists are increasingly studying estrogen as a "neuromodulator," a chemical with powerful effects on the brain as well as the reproductive system. Second, it's not just females who have estrogen, need it and suffer with its loss. Males do too, as a recent study involving the humble songbird makes clear.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Florida teen whose brain was impaled by a fishing spear survived because the spear, which entered his skull above the right eye and exited the back of his skull, missed the main blood vessels in his brain, news reports said Tuesday . Though one might not imagine the brain could take such abuse and survive - and the extent of recovery of 16-year-old Yasser Lopez is still to be determined - there are remarkable stories of those who...
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
For those whose arms as well as legs are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, no skill is more broadly useful to regain than the ability to grasp and move objects. Researchers reporting in Nature magazine this week say they have devised a new way to get a patient's hand to grasp a greater range of objects:  by playing recorded brain commands directly to muscle. For the paralyzed, the technique could provide brain signals a way around the broken spinal cord and allow hand movements more finely tuned to different tasks.
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