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Brains

SPORTS
April 27, 1991
It is just like Dodger fans to be more concerned with food service than play on the field. It takes great brains to stand in line five innings for a hot dog. MICHAEL McADAMS Upland
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1985
For years I've wondered why it's a dirty word to be a do-gooder, a bleeding heart or an intellectual. Is it better to be a do-badder? Wasn't Christ a bleeding heart? Doesn't intellectual imply brains? CORINNE C. WICKS Downey
SPORTS
March 13, 1993
So KMPC has brought back good old Bob Starr, who is even more sophomoric and redundant than the last time he was on Angel radio. Then, those pea brains team him with a guy (Billy Sample) who has absolutely no past connection with the club. Is it any wonder this team never wins? PETE GARDNER Sherman Oaks
NEWS
August 24, 1986
When Maria Shriver and Forrest Sawyer said goodby to "The CBS Morning News," I said goodby to CBS. How could the network fail to give these two fine anchors a chance when they were the best? It is not Maria and Forrest who should have left but rather the CBS "brains" who made the dumb decision. E. C. Knutsen, Desert Hot Springs
OPINION
May 5, 2002
Besides vampires and Hells Angels, rats may be the most public relations-challenged species of all time. Think about it. What are these pointy-nosed, pointy-tailed creatures good for? Chewing walls and wires, gnawing attic treasures, housing fleas and spreading the plague. So, how surprising to learn the other day that doctors in New York (not the surprising part) have wired rats to obey human commands. No, not to walk into rat traps. The doctors stuck three little wires into rat brains.
MAGAZINE
February 18, 1990
It is ironic to me that here in Pasadena a young lady with an IQ of 70 was recently sent to the slammer for tossing her newborn out the window, killing the child, while some bozo in L.A. can suck the brains out of a baby a few weeks younger, get paid up to $8,000 and then state that the abortion procedure is his "passion." There is a terrible sickness here somewhere. KATHY ANDREWS Pasadena
FOOD
February 12, 1997
Every society believes there are aphrodisiac foods. We think of oysters, champagne and chocolate, but a vast number of things have had a rep somewhere: anchovies, asparagus, brains, chiles and garlic, just for an alphabetic sample. Most are either stimulants or sources of protein, so a dinner of steak and coffee might qualify . . . though it just doesn't, you know, sound romantic.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Dr. Tomoko Kurokawa shares several passions: medicine, travel and food. She also writes compelling stories about her experiences and adventures on her blog, Tomostyle . The family practitioner who lives in Los Angeles and Tokyo brings a fresh perspective on travel to places most of us never go. Her medical missions have taken her to wartime Liberia and post- quake Haiti where food often was in short supply. And she has eaten things most of us would never try (more on that later)
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
There was good reason to be worried when the Lakers lost that second game of the NBA championship playoff series against Boston. The loss was at home. According to new animal research, winning at home appears to be important to the male species' ability to prepare for, and win, future conflicts. In a study with mice, researchers showed that experiencing a win caused changes in the brains that enhanced the ability to win in the future. Researchers also found that winning at home had a particular effect, causing more activity in male hormone receptors in brain regions thought to influence social aggression.
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