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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Mike Garson obviously takes the piano very seriously, but he can chuckle over some of the contradictory paths that a versatile mastery of the keys has led him down. Maybe the unlikeliest of all is the one he's embarking on Saturday at Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, where he'll lead 44 instrumentalists, augmented by a 55-voice children's choir, in the premiere of his "Symphonic Suite for Healing. " Even an accomplished musician like Garson, who's best known as a key sideman during David Bowie's 1970s rise to superstardom but who usually plays jazz or a jazz-classical fusion when left to his own devices, can laughingly confess that what he's doing isn't brain surgery or as important as finding a cure for cancer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The mother of the 13-year-old girl who became a   cause celebre  after being declared brain-dead at an Oakland hospital last year defended her decision to keep her daughter on a ventilator, saying the case has brought worldwide attention to her plight. Citing alleged death threats, Jahi McMath's family has declined to say where they transferred the teen's body after she was released by Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland to the county coroner. Jahi was declared brain-dead Dec. 12 after surgery three days earlier  at the hospital  to remove her tonsils, adenoids and uvula.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The mother of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old Oakland girl who was declared brain-dead after a complicated surgery that involved removing her tonsils, insisted in a Facebook post this week that her daughter has improved physically, but that it continues to be an "unbelievably difficult time" for the family. Citing alleged death threats, the family has declined to say where they transferred Jahi's body after she was released by Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland to the county coroner.
SCIENCE
February 20, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
You think your dog can sit and stay? You might want to check out the pooches in Budapest, Hungary, that managed to be still for eight-minute stretches in a brain scanner without twitching their tails or moving their bodies more than three millimeters. The 11 border collies and golden retrievers, in fact, equaled or bested their 22 human cohorts in the first-ever comparison of functional magnetic resonance imagery between man and his best friend, said Attila Andics, a neuroscientist at Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest who led the research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014
Jahi McMath, a 13-year-old girl declared brain dead after having tonsil surgery at an Oakland hospital but whose parents refused to take her off a ventilator, is not suffering, her mother wrote Wednesday. The teen was at the center of a patient's rights struggle between her family and the Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland after her death. She has since been moved to an unnamed long-term care facility. "I can tell you that she is much better physically since she has left Children's Hospital and I see changes that give me hope," Nailah Winkfield wrote Wednesday in a Facebook message to KTVU-TV . She did not provide any details on Jahi's physical condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
With its informal setting and freewheeling vibe, the Spirit Awards is known for presenters who wing it and winners who ruffle feathers. This year, maybe literally. Comedian and actor Patton Oswalt, the anointed host of this year's Film Independent extravaganza, has an unorthodox idea for livening up the ceremony: Put some live birds in the mix. On Wednesday, the "Ratatouille" and "Young Adult" star announced that he intends to replace the usual avian-themed trophies with a live bird for each award winner at the March 1 event, a daytime luncheon in a tent on the beach in Santa Monica.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
For Valentine's Day, let's forget love's mysteries and get down to the biological basics that fire some of our fiercest emotions. Jane Austen once wrote: “You pierce my soul. I am half agony and half hope.” Here's why, Jane. Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist, has done extensive research on the topic. In an interview Tuesday with the L.A. Times, the author and Rutgers visiting professor described some of her findings -- culled from longtime married couples still “madly” in love, as well as from love's sad rejects.
SPORTS
February 6, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
They might not agree on doing business with one another and may compete over fight dates, but fight promoters Top Rank, Golden Boy and Ultimate Fighting Championship are acknowledging the effects of their sports. The companies, along with Bellator MMA and Glory kickboxing, combined to give $600,000 to continue the Cleveland Clinic's brain health study that is in its third year of operation in Las Vegas. “We're all contributing to it, fighters want it and senators are supporting it,” Top Rank Chairman Bob Arum said.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A generic blood pressure drug could prevent hyperactive brain cell firing associated with early stages of autism spectrum disorder, according to a new study. Injecting pregnant mice with Bumetanide, a diuretic, appears to correct a developmental switch flipped during childbirth that reverses the firing characteristics of neurons in newborns, according to a study published online Thursday in the journal Science. Bumetanide mimics the effects of oxytocin, a hormone released during labor that helps protect newborns from the stresses and complications of birth, the study found.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
The human hand is a wonder of strength, sensitivity and discrimination - not only because of those four fingers and the opposable thumb, but also because of the human brain that controls it. No wonder, then, that for those who design hand prostheses, re-creating the natural dexterity of the brain-powered hand is a daunting challenge. But a new study demonstrates that, with the aid of some artificial sensors and electrodes sunk into a user's arm, a prosthetic hand can be made to detect the need for a firm grasp or a light touch, to make fine distinctions between an object's texture, weight and size, and to respond accordingly with no detectable delay.
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