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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
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SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Leave it to science to find a way to harsh the mellow of marijuana. A French research team has discovered a natural chemical brake that can tamp down the effects of THC, the main intoxicant in marijuana. They believe it could lead to ways to protect against memory loss, torpor and other side-effects better known as being stoned. “We have this built-in negative feedback mechanism, a brake” on cannabis intoxication, said University of Bordeaux neurobiologist Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza, principal author of a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The family of Jahi McMath this week has continued to clash with hospital officials over what to do with the brain-dead 13-year-old girl. The family has been trying to find a facility that will take Jahi in while at the same time fighting in court to keep her on a ventilator at Children's Hospital Oakland, where she was declared  brain dead  on Dec. 12 -- three days after a tonsillectomy surgery. Sam Singer, a public relations consultant retained by the hospital, said the family must find an outside physician willing to insert breathing and feeding tubes, a way to transport Jahi and a nursing care facility that is willing to accept "a deceased person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Lee Romney
OAKLAND - A court order was extended late Monday that will keep a 13-year-old girl deemed brain-dead on a ventilator for another week, while the facility pledged to work with the family to transfer Jahi McMath elsewhere if certain conditions could be met. Sam Singer, a public relations consultant retained by the hospital, said the family must find an outside physician willing to insert breathing and feeding tubes, a way to transport Jahi and a...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Jason Wells
With the clock winding down on a court order keeping 13-year-old Jahi McMath on a ventilator, medical ethicists say the public drama over the brain-dead girl has fueled a misconception that her condition is somehow treatable. Multiple doctors, including a Stanford neurologist, have concluded that Jahi is brain-dead -- the result of complications from having her tonsils removed at Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland early this month. But her parents have fought to keep her on a ventilator, telling reporters they believe "there's still life there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old girl declared brain-dead after a tonsillectomy, may be moved to a facility in Southern California. Children's Hospital Oakland agreed to transfer Jahi on Friday, and family members have said they'd like to move her to a medical facility in Southern California. They did not name the facility. Doctors at the hospital want to disconnect the girl's ventilator, but her family is fighting to keep her on life support. A judge has ruled that she be kept on life support until 5 p.m. Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Jason Wells
A 13-year-old Oakland girl declared brain-dead due to complications from a tonsillectomy earlier this month remained on life support Wednesday. An Alameda County judge on Tuesday declared Jahi McMath brain-dead but gave her family time to appeal the ruling. Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo told relatives of the girl that they can file an appeal to his decision. Soon after Jahi had her tonsils removed at  Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland on Dec. 9, the eighth-grader went into cardiac arrest and the flow of oxygen to her brain was cut off.  She was declared brain-dead after three tests showed there was no "cerebral activity," according to court records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | By Jason Wells
An Alameda County judge on Tuesday declared a 13-year-old Oakland girl brain-dead due to complications from a tonsillectomy earlier this month, but ordered her kept on life support until next Monday. Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo told relatives of Jahi McMath that until then, they can file an appeal to his decision. Soon after Jahi had tonsils removed at  Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland on Dec. 9, the eighth-grader went into cardiac arrest and the flow of oxygen to her brain was cut off.   She was declared brain-dead after three tests showed there was no "cerebral activity," according to court records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | By Jason Wells
An independent neurologist appointed by a n Alameda County judge  has affirmed that a 13-year-old Oakland girl is brain-dead after a  tonsillectomy on Dec. 9, paving the way for her to be removed from life support. The opinion by Paul Graham Fisher, a pediatric neuro-oncologist at Stanford School of Medicine, backs the assessments of two doctors at Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland after  Jahi McMath had her tonsils removed, went into  cardiac arrest and  the flow of oxygen to her brain was cut off. She was declared brain-dead after three tests showed there was no "cerebral activity," according to court records.
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