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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2002
What astonished me in Michael Sragow's effusive tribute to Marlon Brando ("Contender? More Like a Champion," Feb. 9) was his failure to even mention the obvious parallel to Orson Welles. Both Brando and Welles started out great but soon lost interest and wound up as 300-pound grotesqueries, devoting the last 30 or 40 years of their lives to overpriced cameo appearances in lousy movies, working with mediocre directors in projects they openly despised. In the end, natural talent is not nearly enough; character is finally what matters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 17, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Junior shortstop Dallas Tessar of West Hills Chaminade has committed to Washington. Tessar is also a receiver for the football team. His brother, Brando, was a former Chaminade standout who plays for Oregon.  Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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SPORTS
October 17, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Junior shortstop Dallas Tessar of West Hills Chaminade has committed to Washington. Tessar is also a receiver for the football team. His brother, Brando, was a former Chaminade standout who plays for Oregon.  Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
What actor-crooner gave Marlon Brando the nickname Mr. Mumbles? Frank Sinatra
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1987 | BARBARA MILLER
Every dog--like Mike, Benji, Spuds, Lassie and Rinnie--supposedly has its day. But Brando, the loyal German Shepherd in "Police Academy 4," may beg to differ. It was bad enough that four of Brando's five scenes ended up on the cutting-room floor. Worse, Brando--who plays Clarence (sidekick of co-star Bubba Smith)--went unmentioned in the film's credits! A Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989
Travolta's "fever" never really broke; it just temporarily cooled down. He is an actor who was overpublicized and was incapable of living up to unrealistic expectations. He was portrayed as a macho Brando type when in reality he was more of a Robert Duvall. Though he may never again be a superstar, he is nonetheless a talented actor who is willing to take responsibility for and to learn from his mistakes. With an attitude like this he can do nothing but improve as an actor. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
MAGAZINE
September 23, 1990
Thank you very much for the treat of the Two Jacks--Mathews and Nicholson ("Jack, Laid-Back," by Jack Mathews, Aug. 5). I've been enjoying Mathews since he was with the Detroit Free Press and Nicholson before that, I suppose. Jack Nicholson can put a friendly face on evil better than any American actor, including Brando. That's why I had to laugh when he said: "The rogue male is a character the audience just won't buy." Hey, Jack! This is Fred you're talking to. If that were true, you wouldn't have a career.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996
Stop the (recycled) presses! Your story about Heath McLaughlin in Hollywood ("Making His Own Big Break," by Robert W. Welkos, Nov. 3) was provocative, earth-shattering journalism. My God, think of it--an independent filmmaker raises some money, then produces (and finishes) a low-budget independent film . . . and in Los Angeles, no less. I can't wait for your next feature story on "Assistant Cameraman Loads Magazine, Then Attaches It to Camera." I was also intrigued when I learned that the production attracted Sherilyn Fenn to actually take the role.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999
While I decry the obscene violence in "The Bone Collector," Angelina Jolie proves there that she is everything many of us thought she could be ("A Proverbial Adventurer," by Anne Bergman, Nov. 7). Jolie is an actress who always seems to be playing two emotions: one there on the surface, the other smoldering underneath and fighting to get out. It's the same quality that the young Marlon Brando and James Dean had, a mysterious undercurrent that made them the most intriguing players of their generation.
OPINION
June 4, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Bookshelves real and virtual are stocked with volumes about Los Angeles and Southern California written by people who parachute into a Westside guest house for a few weeks, hit the hot spots and high spots, then write with voice-of-God authority for audiences who wouldn't know the Grapevine from grape juice. But there is authentic writing to be found about Los Angeles. Brando Skyhorse's debut novel, "The Madonnas of Echo Park," won this year's PEN/Hemingway Award for highlighting that neighborhood on the literary map of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If as widely predicted, Woody Allen wins his fourth Academy Award on Sunday, this time for original screenplay for the romantic comedy "Midnight in Paris," an even safer bet will be that Allen won't be there to accept the Oscar. The academy has a long love affair with Allen — a record 23 Oscar nominations, including wins for writing and directing the 1977 best picture winner "Annie Hall" and for his screenplay of 1986's "Hannah and Her Sisters"; 22 of the nominations were for screenplay and directing and one was for lead actor, for "Annie Hall.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A home in Sherman Oaks owned by legendary actor Marlon Brando near the end of his life is on the market at $1,625,000. The nearly three-quarters of an acre property features a diving house that he built for his children, a detached guesthouse, a tennis court and a swimming pool. There are five bedrooms, three bathrooms and 3,027 square feet of living space. Brando, who died in 2004 at 80, is listed among the top male actors of all time by the American Film Institute. He won Oscars for his leading roles in "The Godfather" (1972)
OPINION
June 4, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Bookshelves real and virtual are stocked with volumes about Los Angeles and Southern California written by people who parachute into a Westside guest house for a few weeks, hit the hot spots and high spots, then write with voice-of-God authority for audiences who wouldn't know the Grapevine from grape juice. But there is authentic writing to be found about Los Angeles. Brando Skyhorse's debut novel, "The Madonnas of Echo Park," won this year's PEN/Hemingway Award for highlighting that neighborhood on the literary map of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Mary Murphy, a film and television actress best remembered for playing the wholesome small-town girl opposite Marlon Brando's rebellious motorcycle gang leader in "The Wild One," has died. She was 80. Murphy died of heart disease May 4 at her home in Beverly Hills, said her daughter, Stephanie Specht. In "The Wild One," the 1953 film about two rival biker gangs that menace the citizens of a tiny California town, Murphy played Kathie, the daughter of the ineffectual local cop, who captures the attention of Brando's tough guy, Johnny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Maria Schneider, the French actress who appeared opposite Marlon Brando in "Last Tango in Paris," the 1972 movie whose strong sexual content stirred international controversy, has died. She was 58. Schneider died in Paris on Thursday after a long illness, her family told Agence France Presse. She was a voluptuous, 19-year-old newcomer with long, curly brown hair framing a youthful face when she was cast in writer-director Bernardo Bertolucci's "Last Tango in Paris," in which she played a young engaged Parisian woman looking for an apartment to rent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Alex Espinoza, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Madonnas of Echo Park A Novel Brando Skyhorse Free Press: 204 pp., $23 The Madonnas of Echo Park, in Brando Skyhorse's debut novel of the same name, are a group of Chicanas who flock every Friday night to El Guanaco, "a mercado near Angelino Heights that [sells] rock-hard Twinkies, Colt 45s, and homemade tacos and burritos in the back." It's the same mercado prominently featured in Madonna's 1984 music video "Borderline," and Skyhorse uses the women as a metaphor to explore the growing pains of one Los Angeles community facing demographic, economic and cultural shifts.
REAL ESTATE
October 8, 1989 | RUTH RYON and Jack Smith, Times Staff Writer
His client was a movie director, realtor Jack Hupp said, and was adamant about living in Beverly Hills. The film maker had found a house he liked, Hupp said, but was so concerned that it have a Beverly Hills address that he made it a contingency in his offer. Hupp discovered to his alarm that the house was not within the city limits of Beverly Hills, but found with some quick checking that it was in the Beverly Hills Post Office area, which means that it has a Beverly Hills mailing address.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
What actor-crooner gave Marlon Brando the nickname Mr. Mumbles? Frank Sinatra
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Early moments of the documentary "Smash His Camera" feature a 1981 clip in which paparazzo Ron Galella stalks Katharine Hepburn on her way to a rehearsal. When his attempt to photograph her through a hedge proves unsuccessful, he jumps in his car and races to the theater where he manages to capture her, albeit mostly shielded by an umbrella, as she ducks in a back door. Narrated by David Frost, the clip has the dramatic pacing of a "Wild Kingdom" episode in which Galella is cheetah to Hepburn's gazelle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Cloris Leachman was convinced she was dead. "I felt the outlines of my body and nothing was in it," she recalls. "I had no brains, no guts, no heart, no bones. This was heaven and I was dead and I was standing there." Of course, she'd just been flung horizontally into the air -- gripped by a single arm and leg -- and twirled around by her dance partner, Corky Ballas, in an encore performance of their "Dancing With the Stars" routine on the talk show "The View."
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