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September 8, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 15-year-old boy, Carlos Diegues had an epiphany while watching a play. He sat intently in the darkened theater viewing a handsome black Brazilian named Orfeu fall into a doomed love affair with a beautiful and poor young black woman named Eurydice. They were surrounded by as much poverty and destitution as their joy and passion. "Orfeu de Conceicao," written by beloved poet and diplomat Vinicius de Moraes, was groundbreaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
A novelist writes of a Brazilian mega-city where the rich soar in helicopters above the traffic and the squalor. A movie depicts rogue Rio de Janeiro cops who kill and extort money from terrified slum-dwellers. A hip-hopper in the peripheral neighborhoods of Sao Paulo raps about daily life in the periferia set to the funky rhythms of samba and U.S. soul. Although the popular outrage that has spilled across Brazil this month has taken some by surprise, the cultural warning signals have been visible for a while.
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NEWS
November 24, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten people have killed themselves since the beginning of the year in this rural community of 3,200 Guarani Indians. The youngest suicide was Fortunata Escobar, 10. Fortunata's father had been away for more than a month, working for a distillery. Her mother had died earlier in the year. Eight brothers and sisters were staying by themselves in the family's rustic hut, with thatched roof and dirt floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
For the Brazilian musical idol Gilberto Gil, the cultural always is the political -- and vice versa. It has been that way since the 1960s, when Gil and several artistic comrades were imprisoned and driven into London exile by Brazil's ruling military junta. Ostensibly, Gil and his colleagues, including Caetano Veloso , were guilty of stirring up the populace with a genre-shattering, socially alert, Afro-rock hybrid called tropicalismo . It was indeed a radical act in a country that takes music (and soccer)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When you're in love, that's the Rio you see," breathes Amy Irving of the Technicolor setting of her latest film, "Bossa Nova," which is directed by her significant other, Bruno Barreto. And when the two are making a film together, they say, they fall in love with each other all over again, so they spent the 10 weeks of rehearsing and shooting the film in Brazil in a state of advanced bliss.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mestre Didi, the leader of an Afro-Brazilian cult of the dead, is a 6th-generation descendant of African slaves. He has traced his ancestors back across the South Atlantic, visited their West African homelands and learned the archaic Yoruba language they spoke. Like Mestre Didi, more than half of Brazil's 145 million people have African ancestors.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
In "Pedro Mico," a raunchy Brazilian movie that you may not really want to see, Pele plays the title role with considerably less finesse than he once displayed playing soccer. Still, Pele's Pedro Mico comes across as a recognizable example of the Brazilian species. Mico is sensuous, open-minded, resourceful and flexible. He wears his only suit, a double-breasted white one, with panache. He lives carefree in a cliff-top shack with a breathtaking view of Rio.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Open the phone book and embark on an expedition into the wondrous world of Brazilian names. A quick search unearths gems: Welfare Almeida, Nostradamus Coelho, Waterloo da Silva, Ben Hur Euzebio and Flavio Cavalcanti Rei da Televisao (King of Television) Nogueira. Let's call one of these people and find out what the heck is going on with these names. "My grandfather's name was Moacir, which in the Tupi Guarani indigenous language means Bad Omen," explains Welfare Almeida, an anesthesiologist.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The doorman intercepted Geusa Maria Cardoso, 21, as she returned to her apartment building one day in March. Use the service entrance, he ordered. Cardoso is mulata, as a woman of mixed-race is called in Brazil. Her complexion reflects her African ancestry, and it caught the doorman's eye that day. He explained later that he thought she was a servant. "She is not a servant," protested Celia Luz, Cardoso's white foster mother, "and even if she were, this discrimination is unacceptable."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
On the stage a six-piece Brazilian band played a series of melodically intricate songs bordering pleasantly on jazz. But the Saturday night crowd's response was muted to this show, a celebration of Brazilian music and culture at the weekly Samba E Saudade nightclub held at the spacious Cover Girl club in Culver City.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2001 | STEPHEN BUCKLEY, WASHINGTON POST
Guests at the gleaming, $300-a-night Copacabana Palace Hotel in the heart of Rio's tourist district used to be offered Caribbean-style pina coladas and daiquiris on arrival. Now they get caipirinhas, a Brazilian specialty made with lime, crushed ice, sugar and a powerful sugar-cane liquor known as cachaca. Years ago, the caipirinha was the poor man's libation and few upper-class Brazilians risked being seen drinking it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting folklore on stage is always a risky, compromising business. It's usually a lot more fun to do a folk dance, for instance, than to see one. It doesn't take a lot of technique--there's a reason it's a folk dance after all--and it often goes on and on until musicians grow weary or people give out. Still, there's a line that can be crossed in trimming and dressing up folklore for theater presentation. Critics argued whether that line was crossed made its first U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 15-year-old boy, Carlos Diegues had an epiphany while watching a play. He sat intently in the darkened theater viewing a handsome black Brazilian named Orfeu fall into a doomed love affair with a beautiful and poor young black woman named Eurydice. They were surrounded by as much poverty and destitution as their joy and passion. "Orfeu de Conceicao," written by beloved poet and diplomat Vinicius de Moraes, was groundbreaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When you're in love, that's the Rio you see," breathes Amy Irving of the Technicolor setting of her latest film, "Bossa Nova," which is directed by her significant other, Bruno Barreto. And when the two are making a film together, they say, they fall in love with each other all over again, so they spent the 10 weeks of rehearsing and shooting the film in Brazil in a state of advanced bliss.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Gilberto Gil brings his kinetic band on stage at the Hollywood Bowl on Sept. 12, world music fans will have the opportunity to experience one of Brazil's most charismatic performers in action. A visual and aural whirlwind, he will be singing, dancing and playing the guitar in front of a high-voltage ensemble, very similar to the one that brought him a world music Grammy for "Quanta Live" earlier this year.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Open the phone book and embark on an expedition into the wondrous world of Brazilian names. A quick search unearths gems: Welfare Almeida, Nostradamus Coelho, Waterloo da Silva, Ben Hur Euzebio and Flavio Cavalcanti Rei da Televisao (King of Television) Nogueira. Let's call one of these people and find out what the heck is going on with these names. "My grandfather's name was Moacir, which in the Tupi Guarani indigenous language means Bad Omen," explains Welfare Almeida, an anesthesiologist.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a sizzling Sunday afternoon, and an old panhandler known as Nilson is hanging out on a busy corner in the beachside neighborhood of Leblon. His shirt is open at the chest, his cheeks bristle with white stubble, and he is wearing a funny-looking pair of rose-colored glasses slightly askew on his nose. Approaching a parked car where a man waits impatiently for someone, Nilson says: "Look at this."
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando Collor de Mello, 41, likes to drive fast cars and motorcycles. He has even taken the controls of a supersonic jet fighter on one of his much publicized weekend outings. And during the week in his Planalto Palace office, Collor is also a man in a hurry. He has ordered a bold series of measures during his first six months in office that are rapidly changing the government and economy of this country.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hard times have returned to Jardin Jacqueline, whose 5,000 inhabitants again are worried about food, jobs and other basics of survival. It seems difficult to believe now, but just a few years ago people in the favela, or slum, breathed easier. They could even afford an exotic luxury: bricks. The neighborhood's low-slung skyline is a monument to the relative boom of consumption that poor Brazilians enjoyed after the end of hyperinflation in 1994.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a magic word that Brazilians use to describe their talent for artful compromise. The word jeito translates roughly as a knack for solving problems, whether bureaucratic entanglements or social conflicts. It applies to the melding of religions that allows tens of millions of Brazilians to call themselves Roman Catholics while practicing rites of African origin.
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