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Brazil Labor

NEWS
March 15, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest country in Latin America completes a long transition to democracy today with the inauguration of Fernando Collor de Mello, 40, as the first popularly elected Brazilian president since a 1964 military coup. The event has drawn a host of foreign dignitaries to this 30-year-old inland capital, including President Fidel Castro of Cuba and Vice President Dan Quayle.
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NEWS
March 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Strikes by bus and train workers over wages slowed millions of commuters in Rio de Janeiro on Tuesday. Nearly all 25,000 union workers were on strike, said Luis Martins, president of the Bus Workers Union. A spokesman for employers said almost half the 6,200 buses were operating. The union wants a six-hour day and a 30% pay increase, Martins said. Drivers earn about $150 per month, and employers have offered an 18% increase, he said.
NEWS
June 1, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
The eight-week strike at the Ford and Volkswagen plants near Sao Paulo has developed into a major test of strength between the 200,000-member metalworkers' union and the foreign-owned companies that have made Brazil the largest producer of autos in Latin America. It has also frustrated the new civilian government's effort to reduce the labor tension that has plagued its first two months in office.
NEWS
May 21, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
A wave of labor militancy, born of inflation-slashed earning power and thriving on the freedom provided by the return of democratic government, is costing Brazil's debt-ridden economy millions of dollars and generating political tensions that have divided the Cabinet of President Jose Sarney. After years of authoritarian military rule, which repressed union demands and forced down workers' wages, there is an explosive demand from labor for better pay and working conditions.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2007 | Stan Lehman, From the Associated Press
batatais, brazil -- As dawn cracks over seemingly endless fields of sugar cane, a ragged army of men and women sharpen their machetes to harvest the raw material for Brazil's "white gold." With machine-like precision, the cane cutters gather five 8-foot-tall stalks in the crook of one arm, bend over and cut them down with three swift machete whacks -- a process they will repeat over and over again for as long as 12 hours a day.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
The assembly lines at some of Brazil's biggest auto plants came to a halt Monday as thousands of workers walked off their jobs demanding higher wages. Union leaders said at least 60,000 workers at Ford, Volkswagen, General Motors, Mercedes Benz, Toyota, Honda and Scania went on strike in Sao Paulo state, bringing to a halt the production of 4,000 vehicles a day.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | TODD LEWAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marta dos Anjos Rocha, 8, lost her lungs in the charcoal ovens. She was 5 when she became a slave at this camp, packing eucalyptus logs into kilns of brick and mud that "cook" the charcoal powering most of the steel mills in Brazil. Marta never had anything to protect her bare feet and hands from the hot coals, no goggles for the swirling ash, no mask--not even a rag--to keep her lips and lungs free of the smoke. And she couldn't quit, either.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | From Washington Post
At Brazilian restaurants in Rio de Janeiro and Washington on Wednesday night, MCI Communications Corp. executives celebrated a World Cup-size telecommunications victory: their $2.3-billion winning bid for Embratel, Brazil's only long-distance carrier, which will give MCI total control over long-haul voice and data communications in Latin America's biggest market. The acquisition will also help it better serve U.S.
NEWS
September 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Thousands of demonstrators booed scandal-plagued President Fernando Collor de Mello at a military parade Monday and called for his resignation as Independence Day protests erupted around the country. Opposition leaders said the protests were spontaneous. They said that plans for huge anti-government rallies were dropped to avoid antagonizing military leaders, who have discreetly endorsed a campaign to remove the president.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Alfeo Prandel was out in his Volkswagen, driving sandy rural roads, looking for slaves. He stopped near a battery of charcoal ovens, like big beehives, where four young men were taking a break from work. They said they had been brought a long distance, in a truck, to the western state of Mato Grosso do Sul from the state of Minas Gerais two months ago to make charcoal from eucalyptus trees that grow in plantations covering a million acres here. It is hard, hot work, dawn to dusk.
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