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Breakaway

ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009 | Art Winslow, Winslow is a former literary and executive editor of the Nation.
Blood and Politics The History of the White Nationalist Movement From the Margins to the Mainstream Leonard Zeskind Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 622 pp., $35 -- This April, when the Department of Homeland Security issued a report titled "Rightwing Extremism: Current Economic and Political Climate Fueling Resurgence in Radicalization and Recruitment," the media world was briefly ablaze debating whether it was true.
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WORLD
May 17, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
When it came time to register voters for a presidential election in Somaliland, this dirt-poor breakaway republic picked the most expensive fingerprint-identification technology available to prevent fraud. Then it seemed everyone did their best to undermine it. With many people using different fingers on a biometric scanning pad or other ways to fool the device, nearly twice as many as the 700,000 to 800,000 estimated eligible voters received voter cards.
SPORTS
March 12, 2009 | HELENE ELLIOTT
As bad as things have gotten for the Ducks this season -- and they nearly got very bad before Scott Niedermayer's overtime breakaway lifted them to a 4-3 victory over the Vancouver Canucks at the Honda Center -- General Manager Bob Murray said he had never considered firing Coach Randy Carlyle. Murray chose instead to fire some of his players, pulling off a series of trades aimed at now and the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Paul Pringle
Late into the night, the last of the holdouts stood pressed against the locked glass door, peering into the murky streets of downtown Oakland, waiting to be routed from their building by fellow unionists. A long standoff between the giant Service Employees International Union and its second-largest California local was nearing an end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2009 | Joanna Lin and Ari B. Bloomekatz
At St. James Anglican Church in Newport Beach, the Rev. Richard Crocker told parishioners Sunday to await the "good news of a God who's with us," an upbeat message despite a recent legal ruling that could strip the congregation of its property because of its break with the Episcopal Church. At St. John's Cathedral near downtown Los Angeles, whose congregation has remained within the Episcopal fold, the Very Rev. Canon Mark R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2009 | Maura Dolan and Duke Helfand
Rebellious congregations that part ways with their denominations may lose their church buildings and property as a result, the California Supreme Court said Monday in a unanimous ruling. The state high court decision came in a case involving the Episcopal Church, but lawyers said it would apply to other denominations as well. Several Protestant denominations, including United Methodists and Presbyterians, have faced upheaval over gay rights issues.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Nearly a dozen conservative congregations have won a state lawsuit in which they sought to split from the U.S. Episcopal Church in a dispute over theology and homosexuality. The rulings came from a Fairfax County judge who said the departing congregations are allowed to keep church buildings and other property as they realign under the authority of conservative Anglican bishops from Africa. Eleven Virginia congregations were involved in the lawsuit. Since then, entire dioceses have voted to leave.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Helfand is a Times staff writer.
Hundreds of conservative Episcopal congregations in North America, rejecting liberal biblical views of others in the denomination, formed a breakaway church Wednesday that threatened to further divide a global Anglican body already torn by the ordination of an openly gay bishop.
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Tim Judah, Tim Judah covers the Balkans for the Economist. He is the author of "The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia" and the forthcoming "Kosovo: What Everyone Needs to Know."
Afew months ago, I traveled to Sukhumi, a balmy, war-wrecked seaside resort that is the capital of Abkhazia. Abkhazia and South Ossetia, as anyone who has followed the news of the last week cannot fail to know, are the two breakaway regions of Georgia. In pelting rain, I crossed the Inguri River from Georgia proper into Abkhazia and noticed that the Georgians had erected a giant sculpture on their side. It was of a pistol pointing at Abkhazia, but the barrel of the gun had been tied in a knot.
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