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Breast Cancer

ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Kathy Bates has beaten cancer yet again, she revealed Wednesday. "Hey All, sorry for the long silence," she said in a two-part Twitter message. "I was diagnosed with breast cancer 2 months ago & am recovering from a double mastectomy. ... I don't miss my breasts as much as I miss Harry's Law. ;-) Thanks for all the sweet tweets. Y'all kept me going. " The "Titanic" actress was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2003, an experience she discussed in the video above, for the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
HEALTH
January 26, 2009 | Marc Siegel, Siegel is an internist and an associate professor of medicine at New York University's School of Medicine.
"Nip/Tuck" FX, season premiere: Jan. 6 and 13, 10 p.m. The premise Plastic surgeon Dr. Christian Troy (Julian McMahon) takes his associate Dr. Liz Cruz (Roma Maffia) for a mammogram because he thinks he felt a lump in her breast. The test is negative but, while at the radiologist's office, Troy admits that he himself has felt a lump in his own chest.
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Could stress play a role in the development of breast cancer? Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago wondered about this. After all, the components of what experts call “psychosocial stress” - including fear, anxiety and isolation - could take a toll on the autonomic nervous system, which helps regulate heart rate, respiration and other important bodily functions. So they found 989 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the previous three months and asked them a lot of questions to assess their level of stress.
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
For many women, the fight against breast cancer is public, with support from friends and family and frequent discussions with healthcare professionals about side effects and treatment. But part of that fight is intensely private -- rarely more so than when it affects their sex life. Certain chemotherapy drugs send women into early menopause within a few months. That, coupled, with hair loss and disfiguring mastectomies, leave some breast cancer survivors struggling to be intimate again, a new study finds.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug pertuzumab when added to Herceptin improved the treatment of women with early-stage, HER-2 positive breast cancer, researchers reported Friday at the annual meeting of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . Pertuzumab is an experimental monoclonal antibody. In the study, 417 women received monoclonal antibody drug therapy before having surgery to remove the tumor. Some women also underwent chemotherapy. Adding pertuzumab to Herceptin -- which is also known by the generic name trastuzumab -- along with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel led to a tumor eradication rate of 46%. That is 50% better than the tumor eradication rate achieved with the standard therapy of docetaxel and Herceptin combined, said the authors of the paper, from the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Here's new evidence that the condition known as “chemo brain” is real: A study of breast cancer patients finds that women who had chemotherapy along with surgery to treat their disease had more trouble kicking their brains into high gear than women who were treated with surgery alone. They also performed much worse on tests of mental function than a group of healthy women who served as controls. The study , published Monday in Archives of Neurology, included 25 breast cancer survivors who had surgery and chemotherapy, 19 breast cancer survivors who had surgery but no chemotherapy, and 18 women with no history of breast cancer who were picked because their ages, level of education and menopausal status were similar to those of the women who had chemo.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | Pregnant breast cancer patients more likely to survive
There may be few pregnancy nightmares worse than finding a lump in one's breast, given the dueling fears that if it's cancer, treatment could harm the developing fetus, while delay and pregnancy hormones could fuel a tumor's growth. But a new study finds that pregnant women treated for breast cancer are more likely to survive their ordeal than breast cancer patients of the same age who were not pregnant when their cancer was diagnosed. Five years after their diagnosis, almost 74% of the women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy were still alive.
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