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SCIENCE
February 18, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A team of researchers from the City of Hope in Duarte has developed a speedy way to identify drugs and chemicals that can disrupt the balance of sex hormones in human beings and influence the development and progress of diseases such as breast cancer. In a trial screening of 446 drugs in wide circulation, the new assay singled out the popular antidepressant paroxetine (better known by its commercial name, Paxil) as having a weak estrogenic effect that could promote the development and growth of breast tumors in women.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
For many women, the fight against breast cancer is public, with support from friends and family and frequent discussions with healthcare professionals about side effects and treatment. But part of that fight is intensely private -- rarely more so than when it affects their sex life. Certain chemotherapy drugs send women into early menopause within a few months. That, coupled, with hair loss and disfiguring mastectomies, leave some breast cancer survivors struggling to be intimate again, a new study finds.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug pertuzumab when added to Herceptin improved the treatment of women with early-stage, HER-2 positive breast cancer, researchers reported Friday at the annual meeting of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . Pertuzumab is an experimental monoclonal antibody. In the study, 417 women received monoclonal antibody drug therapy before having surgery to remove the tumor. Some women also underwent chemotherapy. Adding pertuzumab to Herceptin -- which is also known by the generic name trastuzumab -- along with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel led to a tumor eradication rate of 46%. That is 50% better than the tumor eradication rate achieved with the standard therapy of docetaxel and Herceptin combined, said the authors of the paper, from the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | Pregnant breast cancer patients more likely to survive
There may be few pregnancy nightmares worse than finding a lump in one's breast, given the dueling fears that if it's cancer, treatment could harm the developing fetus, while delay and pregnancy hormones could fuel a tumor's growth. But a new study finds that pregnant women treated for breast cancer are more likely to survive their ordeal than breast cancer patients of the same age who were not pregnant when their cancer was diagnosed. Five years after their diagnosis, almost 74% of the women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy were still alive.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
A new genetic test may help determine whether a small tumor in the breast is likely to turn in to full-blown breast cancer, according to a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The small tumor, called a ductal carcinoma in-situ, or DCIS, resides in the milk ducts and is generally considered pre-cancerous. But according to the study, DCIS lesions left untreated will eventually progress to breast cancer in about 50% of patients. The lesions, which tend to be small and only detectable via mammogram, have become increasingly common as mammography has become more widespread.
HEALTH
January 26, 2009 | Marc Siegel, Siegel is an internist and an associate professor of medicine at New York University's School of Medicine.
"Nip/Tuck" FX, season premiere: Jan. 6 and 13, 10 p.m. The premise Plastic surgeon Dr. Christian Troy (Julian McMahon) takes his associate Dr. Liz Cruz (Roma Maffia) for a mammogram because he thinks he felt a lump in her breast. The test is negative but, while at the radiologist's office, Troy admits that he himself has felt a lump in his own chest.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details. Another reason to avoid the carbs: Researchers reported Thursday that increased carbohydrate intake was associated with a higher rate of breast cancer recurrence in survivors of the disease. Starch intake seemed to be particularly influential, they said, accounting for 48% of changes in the women's carbohydrate intake. "Women who increased their starch intake over one year were at a much likelier risk for recurring," team leader Jennifer Emond, a doctoral student in public health at UC San Diego, said in a statement.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Here's new evidence that the condition known as “chemo brain” is real: A study of breast cancer patients finds that women who had chemotherapy along with surgery to treat their disease had more trouble kicking their brains into high gear than women who were treated with surgery alone. They also performed much worse on tests of mental function than a group of healthy women who served as controls. The study , published Monday in Archives of Neurology, included 25 breast cancer survivors who had surgery and chemotherapy, 19 breast cancer survivors who had surgery but no chemotherapy, and 18 women with no history of breast cancer who were picked because their ages, level of education and menopausal status were similar to those of the women who had chemo.
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