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NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
In a study suggesting that red wine might be the next big thing in breast cancer prevention, a study has found that women who drank just under two servings of red wine daily experienced hormonal changes that mimic the effects of a drug used to prevent malignant breast tumors from coming back. The study, published Friday in the Journal of Women's Health, found that consuming the same amount of white wine did not have the same effect in premenopausal women participating in the study.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The long-debunked idea that abortions can contribute to breast cancer is reappearing amid the outpouring of comments this week on Susan G. Komen for the Cure's decision to stop funding Planned Parenthood breast-health programs. Here's one comment on Komen's Facebook page: "Also! Breast cancer is linked to abortions!!! More and more studied are pointing to abortions for a huge risk factor for BC, why should SGK support something that raises the chances of what they wasn't destroyed?
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Could stress play a role in the development of breast cancer? Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago wondered about this. After all, the components of what experts call “psychosocial stress” - including fear, anxiety and isolation - could take a toll on the autonomic nervous system, which helps regulate heart rate, respiration and other important bodily functions. So they found 989 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the previous three months and asked them a lot of questions to assess their level of stress.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug pertuzumab when added to Herceptin improved the treatment of women with early-stage, HER-2 positive breast cancer, researchers reported Friday at the annual meeting of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . Pertuzumab is an experimental monoclonal antibody. In the study, 417 women received monoclonal antibody drug therapy before having surgery to remove the tumor. Some women also underwent chemotherapy. Adding pertuzumab to Herceptin -- which is also known by the generic name trastuzumab -- along with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel led to a tumor eradication rate of 46%. That is 50% better than the tumor eradication rate achieved with the standard therapy of docetaxel and Herceptin combined, said the authors of the paper, from the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Slogging through all the pink-themed products, promotions and publicity centered on breast cancer awareness month, it's been tough to find anything that stood out. But we did. We found this video from the Canadian-based organization Rethink Breast Cancer advertising an app that reminds you to do a breast self-exam. But this is no ordinary breast cancer video, and this is not your everyday app. The video begins with "Dr. " Rothaford Gray talking about how many women aren't checking regularly for breast cancer.
HEALTH
April 12, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Breast-cancer-screening isn't like looking for a needle in a haystack. It's harder. It's like looking for needles in a big field of haystacks, where some of the haystacks have needles, while most don't, but you don't know which are which, so you have to look in all of them. Mammography is the best technique available right now to look for breast cancers in women who don't have any symptoms. On average, screening mammograms correctly identify 80% to 85% of women who have cancer and about 90% of women who don't.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Women with early-stage breast cancer have plenty of procedures and treatments to deal with. So it may come as welcome news that a large clinical trial has found no reason for doctors to perform two tests that were thought to help predict patient survival. Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the researchers say that the test results are meaningless. The tests in question involve looking for micrometastasis - microscopic evidence of a breast tumor's spread - in sentinel lymph nodes and in bone marrow.
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