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Breast Cancer

SCIENCE
June 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The U.S. Supreme Court decision that Myriad Genetics cannot patent two genes linked to ovarian and breast cancer came as welcome relief to researchers whose work on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes had been thwarted by legal challenges from the company. But while researchers and clinicians no longer will receive cease-and-desist orders from Myriad, they will have to labor for years to catch up with the data and analysis the Utah-based company has been able to accumulate during the 17 years it held a U.S. monopoly on analyzing the genes, said Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Janet Kinosian
Monica Potter, who plays Kristina Braverman on NBC's sleeper hit "Parenthood" (just renewed for a fifth season), had an emotional story about breast cancer this past season that had multitudes of fans clinging to boxes of Kleenex. And while it's not new territory for television (Kim Catrall on "Sex and the City" and Candice Bergen in "Murphy Brown" came before), it was nonetheless a journey of discovery for Kristina - and Potter herself. "I now know so much better what so many other women have the courage to go through," Potter says.
SCIENCE
June 13, 2013 | By Amina Khan
When Dr. Wayne Grody heard that the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Myriad Genetics could not patent two genes linked to breast cancer, the UCLA medical geneticist was minutes from giving a well-worn speech on the years-old case to a room full of University of Oregon medical school students. "I improvised when I got to the very end," Grody said. The court's 9-0 decision in the case involving the Utah-based Myriad Genetics was welcome news to Grody as well as other doctors and genetic counselors concerned about future research and genetic counselors who said they've had their hands tied by the company's high prices and tough patent enforcement.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
After producing documentaries about the history of baseball, the Civil War, jazz and a variety of other topics, Ken Burns is turning his attention to cancer. Burns will be teaming up with Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. " The series, to air on PBS stations in the spring of 2015, will be directed by Barak Goodman of the New York-based documentary film production company Ark Media. In awarding "The Emperor of All Maladies" its 2011 prize for general nonfiction, the Pulitzer judges called the book "an elegant inquiry, at once clinical and personal, into the long history of an insidious disease that, despite treatment breakthroughs, still bedevils medical science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
An aunt of Angelina Jolie who carried a same gene mutation linked to breast cancer as the actress has died of the disease at an Escondido hospital, according to an interview with her husband. Debbie Martin, 61, passed away early Sunday, only a few weeks after Jolie announced that she had undergone surgery to remove both of her healthy breasts as a preventive measure because she carried the defective BRCA1 gene. Jolie wrote about her decision in a May 14 op-ed in the New York Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a neurological disease robbed Barbara Brenner of her voice, the fiercely outspoken activist still managed to be heard. She corralled technology, speaking through a text-to-voice application on her iPad and blogging about the concerns - including her own - of the seriously ill with frankness and wit. She called her blog Healthy Barbs. Her journey from lawyer to full-time advocate began 20 years ago after she was diagnosed with breast cancer and wrote an impassioned letter to the editor of the San Francisco Chronicle about the need for breast cancer research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
Four days after her April 27 breast reconstruction, the third and final surgery aimed at sparing her an early death from breast cancer, Angelina Jolie was in good spirits at home. Upon paying a house call, her surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk of the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Beverly Hills, found two walls of the actress' home covered with "freshly assembled story boards" for her next directorial project. "All the while she spoke," the doctor later wrote on her blog, "six drains dangled from her chest, three on each side, fastened to an elastic belt around her waist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
In the wake of Angelina Jolie 's announcement that she had a double mastectomy because of a rare gene, the American Cancer Society is warning that the radical surgery should not be taken lightly. Experts said that while the surgery is totally appropriate in certain cases, Jolie's path is not for everyone. "This does not mean every woman needs a blood test to determine their genetic risk for breast and/or ovarian cancer ,” said Dr. Otis W. Brawley, the American Cancer Society 's chief medical officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
After undergoing a cancer-preventive double mastectomy and breast reconstruction, Angelina Jolie will follow up with surgery to remove her ovaries, according to a report in People magazine. Jolie's mother, Marcheline Bertrand, died of ovarian cancer at age 56 after fighting the disease for a decade, and doctors said Jolie had a 50% chance of developing the same, the actress revealed in an op-ed this week in the New York Times. The 37-year-old mother of six said she and her children have often discussed "Mommy's mommy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Only moments after Angelina Jolie's revealing op-ed was published late Monday, the actress' name was trending on Twitter. From celebrities to cancer survivors, tens of thousands voiced their support for Jolie's decision to undergo a preventive double mastectomy. "I commend Angelina Jolie for her courage and thoughtfulness in sharing her story today regarding her mastectomy. So brave!" wrote Sheryl Crow, a breast cancer survivor herself. "Brave, honest strong," said Oscar winner Marlee Matlin. "Proud of her for using her incredible platform to educate women," added E!
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