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Breast Feeding

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NEWS
March 25, 1993 | DIANNE KLEIN
This is how I envision it. Start with a bold guerrilla action, a call to arms. (Or another female body part). The idea would be to wake society up (some segments more so than others) and spur action to free women from yet another form of bondage. I figure a photo op could be declared to ensure maximum exposure. And I personally guarantee that many of my colleagues would show up. Of course, you've got to bill the thing right.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Emily Foxhall
Lindsay Jaynes never intended to become an overnight social media sensation when the 30-year-old mother asked Delta Airlines about its policy for in-flight breast-feeding. The new mother planned to buy a ticket from John Wayne Airport to Florida with her now 6-week-old son in March, and wanted to be prepared for her baby's first trip. To Jaynes' surprise, the response from a Delta representative transformed the Newport Beach resident into an advocate for breast-feeding mothers, her story reaching far beyond Orange County.
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NEWS
December 20, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breast-feeding infants for at least six months appears to give kids' an advantage in school, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics . Many other studies have also found a small effect on school performance from breast-feeding. This study, however, was unique in that boys appeared to benefit the most. The researchers, from the University of Western Australia in Perth, have followed 2,868 children since the early '90s. The study showed that, at age 10, boys who were breast-fed for six months or longer scored higher in math, reading and spelling compared with boys who were breast-fed for less than six months.
SCIENCE
September 23, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Two new studies, both released Monday, offer additional evidence -- if any were really needed -- that breast-feeding can be really, really difficult for mothers. In one analysis , published in the journal Pediatrics , researchers interviewed first-time mothers at the UC Davis Medical Center to assess their breast-feeding practices, concerns and problems before they gave birth and on several occasions over the first two months of their babies' lives.  They found that 92% of mothers reported breast-feeding concerns at the peak time of difficulty (their child's third day of life)
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Breast-feeding is often encouraged for women with multiple sclerosis. It's not only good nutrition for the baby, studies have suggested it may protect the mother against a relapse of the disease. A study published Wednesday casts doubt on that assertion, however. Researchers followed 298 women with multiple sclerosis for one year after delivery. About one-third of the women breast-fed their babies for at least two months and the remaining did not breast-feed or only did so for a very short time.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Time magazine fanned the flame around the "attachment parenting" debate Thursday with its provocative cover of a young mom breast-feeding her almost 4-year-old-son. Imagine the controversy the cover would have sparked if she were feeding him vegan breast milk? Oy . The New York Times broached this topic on Room For Debate last month, pitting former child actress and attachment parenting advocate Mayim Bialik against, well, working women. In Motherhood vs. Feminism , the moderator asked: “Has women's obsession with being the perfect mother destroyed feminism?
HEALTH
January 25, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein
The health benefits of breast-feeding for mothers and babies are widely known. Studies have shown it may improve cognitive development among children and could reduce a woman's risk of getting breast cancer or cardiovascular disease. But new research suggests that some very obese woman may not breast-feed as much or for as long as their normal-weight counterparts. The study, released in the January issue of the journal Obesity, looked at information about 3,517 white women and 2,846 black women from 2000 to 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1997
Re "State OK for Breast-Feeding in Public Nears," April 4: It really disappoints me that women are still being subjected to unspoken rules dictating what we can and cannot do with our bodies. The reluctance on the part of Gov. Pete Wilson to sign a bill protecting mothers from being discriminated against while breast-feeding in public signifies the tragic demise of common sense. As Dr. Bruce Smith said, breasts were designed for the express purpose of nurturing a child. Why are Assemblywomen Marilyn Brewer (R-Newport Beach)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1989
I am appalled at Judge Richard Wells' decision in favor of Cafe Rodeo's policy against allowing women to breast-feed their infants at their tables ("Judge Rules for Cafe in Suit Over Breast-Feeding," Metro, June 30). There is something fundamentally wrong with a society which allows smoking in public, which medical experts agree can only be harmful to everyone involved (the smoker and all those nearby), but does not allow breast-feeding in public, which medical experts agree can only be beneficial to everyone involved (the mother and child)
SCIENCE
May 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
One of the first warnings new mothers hear is that offering babies formula soon after birth can lead to problems with breast-feeding.  Sating infants' hunger with formula can prevent them from nursing vigorously, interfering with milk production; letting them use a bottle and nipple can interfere with their ability to latch properly at the breast.  Some research has shown that mothers who offer formula in the hospital stop breast-feeding sooner than...
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Good news for babies: The number of mothers breast-feeding is rising across America. So says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a new report released Thursday. From 2000 to 2008, the proportion of mothers who breast-fed their infants rose from 70.3% to 74.6%. Even better, the proportion of mothers who were still breastfeeding after six months jumped from 34.5% to 44.4% during the same period. Why is this good? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breast-feeding for a baby's first six months of life and continued breast-feeding for the second six months, along with solid foods.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
While the recent conversation springing from Time magazine's cover was about nursing into toddlerhood and beyond, studies have shown that most mothers in the United States do not breast-feed their babies for the six months that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends. But the question remained: What did new moms plan? So researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked women their intentions about breast-feeding and then surveyed them each month for a year.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Time magazine fanned the flame around the "attachment parenting" debate Thursday with its provocative cover of a young mom breast-feeding her almost 4-year-old-son. Imagine the controversy the cover would have sparked if she were feeding him vegan breast milk? Oy . The New York Times broached this topic on Room For Debate last month, pitting former child actress and attachment parenting advocate Mayim Bialik against, well, working women. In Motherhood vs. Feminism , the moderator asked: “Has women's obsession with being the perfect mother destroyed feminism?
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Karin Klein
As a mother of three, I have a theory about parenting theories: The number of children a person has is inversely proportionate to that person's probable level of belief in parenting theories. Feed babies by the clock independent of their hunger? A few people are still believers in that, but not many. Tiger moms? Let's not even go there. No, these days the hot topic is "attachment parenting," where the philosophy runs more like: Breast-feed on demand, and seemingly forever. Have the baby in a sling hanging from you as much as possible.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
If early humans had been vegans we might all still be living in caves, Swedish researchers suggested in an article Thursday. When a mother eats meat, her breast-fed child's brain grows faster and she is able to wean the child at an earlier age, allowing her to have more children faster, the article explains. That provided a distinct competitive advantage for early humans when limited resources and a small population made it difficult for them to thrive. "Eating meat enabled the breast-feeding periods and thereby the time between births to be shortened," said psychologist Elia Psouni of Lund University in Sweden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | Irene Lacher
A TV actress with a PhD in neuroscience, Mayim Bialik, 36, takes on a third career as author with Tuesday's publication of "Beyond the Sling: A Real-Life Guide to Raising Confident, Loving Children the Attachment Parenting Way" (Touchstone). Bialik, who starred in the '90s sitcom "Blossom," is a regular on CBS' Caltech comedy, "The Big Bang Theory," where she plays a nerdy neuroscientist. Bialik, who earned her degrees at UCLA, is married to her college sweetie, Michael Stone; they have two sons -- Miles, 6 1/2, and Frederick, 3 1/2. -- What is attachment parenting and why did you write the book?
HEALTH
December 26, 2011
Shari Roan's profile of Louisiana State University fitness and nutrition expert Melinda Sothern was excellent ["The Birth of Obesity," Dec. 19]. Sothern postulates that the obesity epidemic may have roots in the 1950s because "a generation of young women … smoked, spurned breast-feeding, and restricted their weight during numerous, closely spaced pregnancies. " We know that there is great work being done around the nation to combat this "obesity trinity. " Sothern believes we can reverse the epidemic and so do I. As a breast-feeding advocate, I support the surgeon general's call to reduce the barriers to breast-feeding.
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