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WORLD
August 28, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Keep it short and to the point. And above all, don't embarrass the boss. That's the message of a series of official Saudi directives restricting the activities of clerics who issue bizarre fatwas or deliver long-winded sermons, including some who have been accused of simply ripping off sermons from the Internet and reading them aloud. The kingdom's top cleric this week ordered one preacher to shut up after he issued a fatwa , or religious edict, calling on the faithful to boycott a chain of supermarkets because it employs women as cashiers, according to an article posted Friday on the website of the pro-government Arab News.
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NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Four out of 10 mothers surveyed began feeding their infants solid food when they were only 4 months old and their still-developing bodies weren't able to process it -- and more than half the moms said they had been advised to do so by a medical professional.  Those are the findings of a survey released Monday by the journal Pediatrics. Considering that the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology all recommend that parents wait to introduce solid food until their babies are about 6 months old, the results suggest that many parents -- along with the doctors and nurses they rely on -- are woefully out of step with the latest medical advice.  Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent questionnaires to thousands of pregnant women and invited them to take part in the Infant Feeding Practices Study II . Then they checked in with them when their babies were 2, 3 and 4 months old. The responses included in the Pediatrics study were from 1,334 mothers.  Overall, 539 of those mothers -- or 40.4% -- said they started feeding their babies solid food before they turned 4 months old. Those foods included yogurt, tofu, infant cereal, fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, eggs, fish, chicken, meat and even French fries.  Mothers who had been feeding their babies formula were especially likely to introduce solid foods before the four-month mark,...
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Julie Wernau
Blogging moms and nutritionists are criticizing a new formula for toddlers that comes in chocolate and vanilla flavors as an early start to obesity. "Is it really a good idea to get our kids hooked on all things chocolate at the same time they're learning to walk?" one blogger posted on Momlogic.com. "What's next, genetically modifying moms to produce chocolate breast milk?" wrote another. Introduced by Mead Johnson Nutrition Co. in February as a beverage for toddlers who are transitioning from infant formula or breast milk, Enfagrow Premium's toddler chocolate and vanilla formulas are milk-based but contain 19 grams of sugar per 7-ounce serving.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breastfeeding is universally recommended as the superior method for feeding infants because it's linked to long-term prevention of various illnesses including asthma, diabetes and obesity. A study released Monday puts more emphasis on breastfeeding by showing it may have a lasting impact on metabolism. French researchers analyzed three years of data following 234 children and how they were fed after birth. One group of children received only breast milk for the first four months of life.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Laura Desfor Edles
I was disturbed but not surprised to read that central to retiring California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed's " new Master Plan ," as he wrote in his Times Op-Ed article last Tuesday, is a push for "year-round, online" education. As a full-time professor at Cal State Northridge, I am getting a bit worn out by this push (or should I say "shove"). What bothers me most about Reed's promotion of online education as part of the state's Master Plan for Higher Education is his absolute lack of candor.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Time magazine fanned the flame around the "attachment parenting" debate Thursday with its provocative cover of a young mom breast-feeding her almost 4-year-old-son. Imagine the controversy the cover would have sparked if she were feeding him vegan breast milk? Oy . The New York Times broached this topic on Room For Debate last month, pitting former child actress and attachment parenting advocate Mayim Bialik against, well, working women. In Motherhood vs. Feminism , the moderator asked: “Has women's obsession with being the perfect mother destroyed feminism?
NEWS
January 15, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
What could be healthier for a baby than feeding him nothing but breast milk for the first six months of his life? Not relying exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life, according to a small group of experts on pediatric health from the United Kingdom. Writing online this week in the British Medical Journal, they question whether it makes sense for parents in developed countries to follow the World Health Organization’s advice to provide six months of exclusive breast feeding.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The vegan lifestyle isn't mainstream yet, but it's surely on its way thanks to the whole food movement inspired by the likes of "Forks Over Knives" and "Food Inc. " Trendy vegan cookbooks, blogs and personalities continue to multiply as we all get " vegucated ," as do the vegan options served at restaurants. I don't remember the last time I was in a restaurant that didn't serve kale or some sort of braised greens. Then again, this is L.A. But is pushing veganism onto children taking things too far?
SCIENCE
May 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
One of the first warnings new mothers hear is that offering babies formula soon after birth can lead to problems with breast-feeding.  Sating infants' hunger with formula can prevent them from nursing vigorously, interfering with milk production; letting them use a bottle and nipple can interfere with their ability to latch properly at the breast.  Some research has shown that mothers who offer formula in the hospital stop breast-feeding sooner than...
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